Welcome Amazon for new prosperity

first_imgIt’s been quite some time since I submitted to this page. Having read the Sara Foss Oct. 22 column, “We don’t need Amazon,” on the remote possibilities of acquiring the much-sought-after Amazon Headquarters for the Capital Region, I felt it was time.It was enlightening to find out, there was indeed a new threat to be concerned about, other than the oft-dreaded Republicans. Should this headquarters come to pass, a new invasive species would arrive, the “middle class-youthful techie.” These creatures will drive up housing prices and bring phenomena not seen in these parts since the wistful days, when GE ruled the landscape: prosperity. More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidation Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinioncenter_img When I served on the Schenectady City Planning Commission, we were told we told we needed to attract these creatures. Yet, another myth exploded.The column further warns on the hazards of turning over the region to become a “one company” town. After all, it says The Gazette is not privy to the proposed obscene costs to the taxpayer. It’s as if the writer didn’t notice “marble palaces of taxation” dotting the landscape in Albany.These bastions of government have spit out one “non-working, feel good” program after another for decades, burying municipalities with unfunded mandates. Clearly this Amazon thing would be a competitor.Yuck. Prosperity, who needs it.Frederic LeeSaratogalast_img read more

Read More →

Landslide victims should sue owner

first_imgRegarding the Barney Street lawsuits: I find it interesting that the people trying to sue for damages caused by the landslide are all going after the city of Schenectady.I’m guessing that because the city has deeper pockets, more money, that is the reason for these actions.But why not go after the people who owned the property that was the cause of the landslide instead?If they had notified the city to shut off water to the property they walked away from, it seems like there may not have been an issue. The city may have known that there was a possibility of a landslide under certain conditions, but it had no clue that said property was abandoned.If the people who suffered losses and injuries could prove that the city was aware of the abandoned property and water not shut off, then maybe you’d have a legal leg to stand on. Sorry that people had to go through something as awful as they did, but I don’t think these lawsuits will really fly.If the city can’t find the owners, good luck. But I think you’re going after the wrong people with your lawsuits.Jeannette KenneallySchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Schenectady’s Lucas Rodriguez forging his own path in dance, theater, musicEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusSchenectady High School senior class leaders look to salvage sense of normalcyMotorcyclist injured in Thursday afternoon Schenectady crash Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Read More →

Mountains providing solid base

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Read More →

Noho offices: media crowd mixes with the fashionistas

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Read More →

Worcestershire: Without Longbridge, fewer enquiries

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Read More →

Expense is part of the service

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Read More →

Prudential JV eyes Reading scheme

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Read More →

In bid to slow coronavirus, Canada shuts borders to foreign nationals

first_imgAs the virus’ spread accelerates in Canada, Trudeau urged people to stay home and restrict contact with others.”Staying home is an important step to protect the community and each other. We all have to do it,” he said.Theresa Tam, Canada’s chief public health officer, said that the next two weeks were crucial in trying to stem the outbreak.The death toll in Canada rose to four on Monday from one on Sunday. The number of infected jumped to 407 from the 341 reported at 9 a.m. (1300 GMT) earlier in the day, medical officials said. Topics : The new deaths occurred in the same nursing home in the Pacific province of British Columbia, which is directly north of Washington, one of the worst-hit US states.Trade will not be affected by the border closing. Canada shares a long unguarded frontier with the United States, which takes 75% of Canadian goods exports.Asked why US citizens were exempt, Trudeau said the close bilateral integration meant the United States was in a different category from other nations. But he added that more measures could be announced soon.”Both countries rely on each other to provide essential goods … so it’s very important we do this with a degree of precision and in the spirit of a strong relationship,” Health Minister Patty Hajdu later told reporters.British Columbia said, however, it was concerned that US citizens would be allowed in.”Our strong message [is] that visitors from the United States not come to British Columbia,” said provincial Health Minister Adrian Dix.The border closure helped drive down Air Canada’s stock by as much as 38%.Canada will reroute all international flight arrivals to four airports – Toronto, Calgary, Montreal and Vancouver – and has imposed tougher screening.Weddings, baptisms on hold?The country’s main stock market index tumbled nearly 10% and the Canadian dollar hit a four-year low.Ontario, the most-populous province, and one that accounts for nearly half of confirmed cases, said it would delay a March 25 budget and instead deliver an economic and fiscal update.Toronto, Canada’s largest city, recommended that bars and restaurants stop in-person service and that theaters close.Quebec on Monday recommended the suspension of all religious functions, including baptisms, weddings and funerals. For any funerals that proceed, the number of mourners should be reduced, the province said, without specifying how many.”If it’s possible for you to express your caring to the family, do it by internet, or by phone,” Public Health Director Horatio Arruda said.Trudeau, who has promised to unveil a major stimulus package soon, said that “in the medium term and then into the long term, we will need to invest significant amounts to restore people’s confidence in the economy.”center_img Canada closed its borders to all foreign nationals except US citizens and permanent residents on Monday, with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau urging people to limit social contact to stem the spread of the new coronavirus.Several other countries have taken the same step. The 27-nation European Union proposed shutting its external borders for 30 days on Monday.”We will be denying entry into Canada to people who are not Canadian citizens or permanent residents … it is a significant step that we take in exceptional circumstances,” Trudeau told reporters outside his home, where he is under quarantine after his wife, Sophie, tested positive for the respiratory virus.last_img read more

Read More →

Olympic saga reveals Japanese sports world’s lack of influence

first_imgTopics : A JOC official commenting about his organization’s omission from the critical decision-making process, said, “We’ve been left out of the loop.”In 1980, Japan joined the U.S.-led boycott of the Moscow Olympics to protest the Soviet Union’s invasion of Afghanistan. As a result of that political decision about sports, the JOC was made independent.Since that time, when he was judoka aiming to compete in Moscow, Yamashita has been a leader within Japan’s Olympic movement, but this time he said, “We have no say at all in this decision.”Cry though they might, there was no indication Japanese athletes’ concerns would be heard at the political level. The unprecedented decision to postpone the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics by one year amid the spread of the coronavirus has highlighted the impotence of Japan’s sports community.Although the decision was finalized at a lofty political level, it only happened after individual athletes forced the hand of sports federations and national Olympic committees abroad. And while that was happening, the voice of the host country’s sports world was all but mute.On March 24, the night the official decision to postpone was made, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Olympic organizing committee President Yoshiro Mori, and Tokyo Gov. Yuriko Koike spoke by telephone with International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach. Japanese Olympic Committee President Yasuhiro Yamashita was conspicuously absent from the discussion.center_img Overseas, however, it was a different story. Athletes expressed their opinions, demanding a postponement over social media. Their outrage influenced national Olympic committees as well as domestic and international sports federations, eventually forcing the IOC to seek the postponement it had once rejected.But that kind of athlete activism barely occurred in Japan, where there is a strong culture of pressuring individuals to conform. When JOC director Kaori Yamaguchi spoke out on March 19, calling for a postponement for the sake of the athletes, Yamashita slammed her for talking out of turn, calling it “extremely disappointing.”While overseas athletes were questioning the wisdom of holding qualifiers and training because of the dangers posed by the coronavirus, men’s pole vaulter Daichi Sawano, the chair of the JOC athletes’ commission, said that would not have happened in his homeland.Even though qualifying events were being postponed one after the other for safety’s sake, Sawano said Japanese athletes would have gone if they could, despite growing sentiment that the games could not be held.”If someone said a qualifying event is being held, athletes would do their best to get there,” he said. “I’m sure the majority of athletes would worry, but continue to train anyway, not knowing whether they’re allowed to voice their opinions.”The Olympics, powered by huge broadcasting fees and sponsorships, are an extremely complex affair that Bach recently referred to as a “beautiful jigsaw puzzle.” In that context, it seems the initiative in decision-making has shifted from the sports world to the political and business world.The sporting world, which includes the JOC, is becoming more and more dependent on national subsidies, placing it in a position where self-assertion is difficult.One executive of a sports federation said it is an unfortunate reality that “can’t be helped.”A JOC executive said, “It’s already become harder to decide things based on what’s best for sports.”last_img read more

Read More →

COVID-19: Women farmers make masks to protect villagers in South Sumatra

first_imgPrior to the outbreak, the women used the sewing machines to make handicrafts from purun (Chinese water chestnuts), which are commonly found in peatland.Read also: Communities more effective than bans to restore peatlandsBRG’s education deputy for campaigns, participation and partnership Myrna A. Safitri said the mask was more than just protection against the virus. “It’s also a symbol for the women’s movement in villages, which have an important role in protecting and restoring peatland.”The agency, she said, had been working with female farmers in educating them about the importance of not burning peatland, as doing so could prevent forest and land fires.“They have to be taught how to cultivate their land without burning it because they would also be affected by the big fires,” Myrna said during an online discussion on ecofeminism in peatland restoration on Tuesday. (vny)Topics : Women farmers in Menang Raya village in Ogan Komering Ilir regency, South Sumatra, have shifted their focus from weaving plant fibers to producing facemasks to help protect villagers from the fast-spreading COVID-19.Village head Suparedi said the initiative came from the farmers themselves, who made the facemasks to be distributed for free to other villagers.“They use sewing machines provided by the Peatland Restorative Agency [BRG] in 2018, as well as sewing materials to produce the masks,” Suparedi said on Tuesday.last_img read more

Read More →