Close SMC friends named co-valedictorians

first_imgFrom kindergarten graduation to the College’s Commencement, Saint Mary’s seniors Audrey Marrah and Carly O’Connor have been through the ups and the downs together.“We went to the same school since kindergarten and we’ve been like best friends since eighth grade. We both separately decided to come to Saint Mary’s but we’ve still remained friends,” Marrah said.Marrah and O’Connor have a lot in common. They share the same hometown of Kokomo, Ind., and they graduated from Northwestern High School together. Marrah and O’Connor achieved the same 4.0 GPA throughout their time at the College, and now, they have been both been awarded the honor of co-valedictorian for Commencement this May.“I was really excited,” Marrah said. “We had been hoping we would be able to share the honor together. My main concern when I found out was ‘oh, did Carly get it too?’ because it’s more fun if we can both share it together.”Marrah said she and O’Connor learned the news via e-mail a few weeks before Spring Break.“[The e-mail] said I was co-valedictorian but it didn’t say who else it was going to be,” O’Connor said. “So I was really hoping it would be Audrey because I knew that it was likely that she was going to be the valedictorian.”Because of their friendship and history together, both Marrah and O’Connor said they were excited to share the title of co-valedictorian with each other.“I’m so excited,” O’Connor said. “Having known her for so long, and we were roommates for three semesters and being good friends with her — it’s such an honor to share that with her, to share in her hard work and who she is. We get to really share that honor together and I think it’s a really special gift that we’ve been given.”Though the girls have attended school together since kindergarten, they will part ways post graduation. Marrah, a biology major, said she plans to participate in some international service work after graduation on May 15.“There’s a program in Guyana, South America that I’m looking at,” Marrah said. “There’s another one through the Holy Cross Brothers over at Notre Dame, and that program’s in Uganda.”O’Connor majored in English Literature and plans to attend graduate school at the John Paul II Institute in Washington, D.C.“I’ll be getting a masters in theology focused on marriage and the family,” O’Connor said. “This summer I am working at my parish at home as an intern in Family Life Ministry.”Though they will have to say their goodbyes, both Marrah and O’Connor said they were grateful to share their valedictorian experiences together.“It’s been a wonderful gift and I’m very thankful for it,” O’Connor said. “I feel truly blessed.”last_img read more

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U.S. Southern Command Transitions Haiti Efforts

first_imgBy Dialogo June 02, 2010 Five months after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake devastated Haiti, the U.S. Southern Command’s (SOUTHCOM) Joint Task Force Haiti officially completed its mission marking the end of Operation Unified Response. Despite the completion of the humanitarian operation, SOUTHCOM’s commitment to Haiti will continue with engineering projects as part of New Horizons, a joint medical and infrastructure exercise, as well as visits by medical assistance teams. Additionally, the medical staff aboard the U.S. Navy amphibious ship Iwo Jima will provide medical care and perform surgeries during a visit to the Caribbean nation this summer. “These engineering projects and medical services were coordinated and approved by the Government of Haiti and USAID and demonstrate our continued support to the people of Haiti,” said Gen. Douglas Fraser, commander, U.S. Southern Command. “We also have a robust capability to rapidly respond to any future disaster situation in Haiti.” The New Horizons exercises, involving approximately 500 National Guard troops, will take place in various locations in Haiti outside the country’s capital, Port au Prince, from June to September and include the construction of schools, clinics, and community centers that can also serve as hurricane shelters. New Horizons missions began in the mid-1980s as an annual series of joint and combined humanitarian assistance exercises that SOUTHCOM conducts with Latin American and Caribbean nations. The exercises typically last several months, providing medical and infrastructure projects. These missions give deployed U.S. military forces invaluable training opportunities to work with partner nations. In addition to these activities, U.S. Southern Command will fund $13 million in disaster preparedness and humanitarian assistance projects designed to enhance the capacity of the Government of Haiti to provide essential services to its citizens. The projects include the construction of four emergency operations centers and four disaster response warehouses that will increase the Haitian government‘s response capability to future natural and man-made disasters. U.S. military forces delivered more than 2.6 million bottles of water, 2.2 million food rations, 17 million pounds of bulk food and 149,000 pounds of medical supplies to Haiti. Specialized units also improved and increased the capacity at the south pier at the Port au Prince’s main port facility. But perhaps the most renowned U.S. military contribution to Haiti’s recovery was the reopening and operation of Toussaint L’Ouverture International Airport in Port au Prince by the airmen of the 1st Special Operations Wing. Within 30 hours of the earthquake and less than 30 minutes after landing, they reopened airfield operations using hand-held radios to safely land and take-off hundreds of aircrafts which allowed for the abundant flow of international aid as well US and partner nation military humanitarian relief forces.last_img read more

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Argentine Air Force, Ready to Help and Cooperate

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/Diálogo August 13, 2018 Brigadier General Enrique Víctor Amrein, chief of the Argentine Air Force’s (FAA, in Spanish) General Staff, focuses on modernizing the fleet, developing new technologies, and establishing alliances to consolidate FAA as a force in line with the requirements of the future. Brig. Gen. Amrein attended the LVIII Conference of Chiefs of the American Air Forces (CONJEFAMER, in Spanish), held June 19-21, 2018, in Panama City, Panama. During the event, Brig. Gen. Amrein spoke with Diálogo about the process of modernizing the air fleet, international cooperation for disaster relief, humanitarian assistance, and other topics. Diálogo: What’s the importance of FAA’s participation in CONJEFAMER? Brigadier General Enrique Víctor Amrein, chief of the Argentine Air Force’s General Staff: CONJEFAMER has been very important to us since its inception. The second conference was held in our country. Air force commanders are pioneers in global integration. Diálogo: What is the significance of being part of the System of Cooperation Among the American Air Forces (SICOFAA)? Brig. Gen. Amrein: SICOFAA is very important to our country. And now, considering SICOFAA’s new direction, I think that we’ve made a qualitative leap in the importance of the system of cooperation between our air forces, especially in terms of humanitarian assistance for natural or man-made disasters. Diálogo: One of FAA’s main tasks is humanitarian assistance. What’s the importance of FAA’s combined and interagency work with other air forces to provide humanitarian relief? Brig. Gen. Amrein: Humanitarian assistance is a complementary mission for our air force, and it’s fundamental to our government. I’d like to stress that with SICOFAA’s new direction we can come to the aid of countries affected by natural disasters, and we can do it immediately, with our own means. Due to its characteristics, air travel is the fastest means to transport supplies and people and provide humanitarian assistance in general to countries in need. Diálogo: How does FAA prepare for future responses to natural disasters? Brig. Gen. Amrein: FAA adapted its planning and training, as well as enlisting procedures, to bring humanitarian assistance when necessary. Every two years, FAA conducts virtual exercises called Cooperation, in which we plan our forces’ participation in humanitarian relief. FAA also developed software to work on humanitarian response aspects. Likewise, we combined general staff courses for humanitarian assistance, which are taught in our country, and we plan to teach them in other locations through an agreement with the Inter-American Air Forces Academy. Diálogo: FAA is retrofitting and modernizing its air fleet. What improvements were made so far? Brig. Gen. Amrein: The new government [of President Mauricio Macri] granted us permission to start modernizing our fleet, which had been postponed. Based on priority, our initial investments were in pilot training; hence the acquisition of U.S. Texan II aircraft, which already started operating in our country, stands out. We are in the process of modernizing the C-130 aircraft by implementing innovations and removing obsolete features. Out of five aircraft, three were already upgraded in cooperation with the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) program of the U.S. [Department of Defense]. We also acquired four Bell 412 helicopters this year. Diálogo: What improvements were made with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) for the surveillance, control, and search and rescue operations FAA conducts? Brig. Gen. Amrein: In this field, our country decided to conduct its own projects through research and UAV development. FAA is a pioneer in this, but there are also improvements in this area with the Argentine Army and Navy. We made satisfactory progress in class I and II vehicles, which are currently in operation and in the final certification phase. Diálogo: What kind of international collaboration exists between FAA and the U.S. Air Force? Brig. Gen. Amrein: In addition to the relationship we have as SICOFAA members, the U.S. Air Force and FAA have a history of exchanges since their beginnings, when they were created as independent elements in the 1940s. Also, I’d like to mention the State Partnership Program (SPP) [of the U.S. National Guard/Department of Defense] with the Georgia Air National Guard, a program that was just signed last year [2017]. I think this partnership is very important for the cooperation and integration that we have with the U.S. Diálogo: FAA’s El Palomar First Air Brigade was recognized during CONJEFAMER. What was the reason for this honor? Brig. Gen. Amrein: Each year, we select air bases to be awarded in the areas of security and accident prevention within SICOFAA. The performance of the First Air Brigade, home to the C-130 aircraft, was excellent in 2017 and 2018, and it earned this recognition for two consecutive years. This brigade flew more than 3,000 hours with these aircraft in activities conducted in Antarctica, as well as other operational activities. The brigade has modernized aircraft that demonstrated our people’s full capacity to operate at the highest standards of security. Diálogo: What cooperation operations does FAA conduct with neighboring countries to curb transnational organized crime? Brig. Gen. Amrein: Our countries and forces count on binational norms to exchange information about illicit flights, our responsibility, for many years. We have them with Uruguay, Paraguay, and Brazil, and soon we will sign an agreement with Bolivia, as these are neighboring countries located in hot zones in terms of illegal flights or irregular aircraft. These binational norms enable information sharing about any irregular aircraft detected in a country that intends to cross the border toward another. According to the protocol, the information is then transferred immediately, so that it’s possible to anticipate and detect or intercept the aircraft if necessary. Diálogo: What are the outcomes of these international cooperation operations? Brig. Gen. Amrein: We had positive results. We generally carry out exercises every year, but in reality, this exchange of information comes up every day, especially with Brazil and Uruguay, as this is key to exercise airspace control. Diálogo: How is the joint and combined work among the Argentine Armed Forces? Brig. Gen. Amrein: One of our state policies involves integration and joint military action among our country’s three armed forces. Undoubtedly, the main challenges concern logistics support for the problems security forces face, including drug trafficking, human trafficking, and all the issues that are currently addressed. However, we have precise orders to move further with training and combined operations with our partner nations and allies’ armed forces, according to the strategic priorities set by their countries’ foreign policy.last_img read more

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Roosevelt Man Charged With Attempted Murder of Wife

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A New York City corrections officer accused of shooting his wife in the face during an argument at their Roosevelt home last month has been indicted on upgraded charges, prosecutors said.Brian Martin pleaded not guilty at Nassau County court Tuesday to second-degree attempted murder, criminal obstruction of breathing and menacing. The 36-year-old was initially arrested on charges of assault and criminal use of a firearm.Authorities have said Martin shot his wife when an argument escalated at their house on William Street on Dec. 21. Both he and his wife reportedly work at Riker’s Island.Judge Helene Gugerty set bail for Martin at $350,000 bond or $150,000 cash. He is due back in court Feb. 27 and faces up to 30 years in prison, if convicted.last_img read more

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Assemblyman Harvey Weisenberg to Retire

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York New York State Assemb. Harvey Weisenberg (D-Long Beach) announced Monday that he is not seeking re-election, leaving newcomers to race this fall for the seat that he has held for 25 years.The outgoing 80-year-old lawmaker is widely known as an advocate for children with special needs, having passed Jonathan’s Law, which notifies families when reports of abuse are made at a mental hygiene facility where their children are receiving care, and legislation that expanded insurance coverage of autism spectrum disorders. He also helped open Angela’s House, Long Island’s first residential facility for medically fragile children.“I have much to accomplish between now and the end of my term,” Weisenberg said in a statement, vowing to add to the 300 bills he’s helped author and pass. “I will greatly miss my colleagues in Albany.”Weisenberg represents Assembly District 20, which includes Long Beach Island from Point Lookout to Atlantic Beach, as well as the Five Towns area of southwestern Nassau County, plus Oceanside and Island Park.Democrats have a nearly 20 percent edge in voter enrollment over Republicans—39,529 to 31,748—in the district, although there are more than 20,000 unaffiliated voters and over 4,000 minor-party members in the area.Unlike many of his colleagues in the state’s lower legislative chamber, Weisenberg regularly made headlines, although not always for his proposals. He recently made news when he alleged in a federal lawsuit that an AHRC Nassau worker abused his son, a group home resident with cerebral palsy. The suit was reported settled last fall for $120,000.Before he won a February 1989 special election for the Assembly in February 1989, Weisenberg had been a Long Beach city councilman, police officer, teacher, school administrator and lifeguard.He was named in 2003 as assistant speaker pro tempore, meaning he serves as a substitute for Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver (D-Manhattan).Weisenberg will retire when his 12th term ends on his 81st birthday on New Year’s Eve.last_img read more

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Mountains providing solid base

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Prudential JV eyes Reading scheme

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Brexit: Investors return to UK assets in Q2, survey finds

first_img“The survey reflects a period when optimism regarding Brexit (and sterling) was near its peak,” he said. “Investors were less optimistic as a whole, but less pessimistic on their UK asset holdings. The test now will be whether that holds as the practicalities, political and otherwise, of a softer Brexit are fleshed out.”   Institutional investors parked their fears over the UK’s prospective departure from the European Union in favour of increasing their exposure to UK assets in the second quarter of 2018, a new survey has found.According to State Street’s quarterly “Brexometer” study, optimism among the 102 institutions surveyed peaked during the period, with the number of investors looking to decrease their UK weighting dropping to an all-time low of 14% – 10 percentage points lower than recorded in the previous quarter.The number of investors actively seeking to increase their exposure rose a percentage point to 13% – the same as during the second quarter of 2017, the data showed.However, Michael Metcalfe, head of global macro strategy at State Street Global Markets, sounded a note of caution.  UK prime minister Theresa May leaves a European Council meeting on 23 March. The UK is scheduled to leave the EU on 29 March 2019.Concerns remain over the potential impact of the UK leaving the EU in March next year, however. A further poll, conducted by PTL, an independent trustee and governance services provider, revealed that Brexit investment implications ranked second among trustees’ worries about defined benefit risks.Employer covenant risk was the main concern (27.6%), with Brexit and the possibility of new deficit funding rules – which many expect to be introduced by the Pensions Regulator later this year – vying for second and third place with 13.8% and 13.2% respectively. In September last year, Brexit worries were highlighted by just under 11% of trustees – with longevity increases voted the second most worrying factor (12.9%) after covenant risks (24.8%).“The risk score for the investment impact of Brexit has once again increased, perhaps as we near the end of the negotiation period without any real clarity around what will happen to the markets, or those who raise capital through them,” said Richard Butcher, managing director at PTL.“Employer covenant risk remains the highest-rated risk and is up by a sizeable margin for the second consecutive quarter, indicating continued uncertainty about the UK economy and employers’ ability to meet their funding needs.”PTL’s survey also highlighted trustees’ concerns over cyber-security Both surveys emphasised ongoing worries over various macro-economic factors, such as global growth and inflation.last_img read more

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UK appoints new work and pensions secretary amid reshuffle

first_imgRudd also had a brief spell as minister for women and equalities at the start of this year. Former UK home secretary Amber Rudd has been appointed minister for work and pensions following the resignation of Esther McVey yesterday.Her appointment, announced by prime minister Theresa May this afternoon, makes Rudd the third minister to lead the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) this year and the fourth since May took office in 2016.Rudd was home secretary for less than two years before resigning in April this year, after she admitted misleading a parliamentary committee investigating her department’s handling of an immigration scandal.She was elected to parliament in 2010, and joined the UK’s Department of Energy and Climate Change in 2014, becoming the head of the department a year later. Amber RuddMcVey quit the cabinet yesterday morning in protest at the draft agreement between the UK and EU regarding the UK’s exit from the bloc.Brexit minister Dominic Raab also resigned yesterday, and has been replaced Stephen Barclay, who previously led the health department.Guy Opperman remains as minister for pensions and financial inclusion.Short-termism? The work and pensions revolving doorIain Duncan Smith led the DWP from 2010 until 2016, spanning the whole five-year coalition government of the Conservative and Liberal Democrat parties.He was replaced by Stephen Crabb, who lasted just four months before being removed in the wake of the 2016 EU membership referendum.Damian Green then led the department for 11 months before being transferred to the Cabinet Office in June 2017.David Gauke lasted seven months in the role before being replaced by McVey in January.last_img read more

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Why shouldn’t three people get married?

first_imgThe Guardian (UK) 30 August 2012Jean Hannah EdelsteinThree Brazilians in love have their nation up in arms over whether their relationship, now enshrined in a three-way marriage, is legal. The public notary who conducted their marriage says there’s no reason the threesome – or “thruple”, as the internet has charmingly labelled it – shouldn’t enjoy the same kinds of rights imparted upon two people who get hitched. But traditionalists are not impressed: lawyer Regina Beatriz Tavares da Silva, of the Commission for the Rights of the Family, has it “absurd and totally illegal”.Speaking of absurd, shall we take a moment to consider traditional marriage? We do adore it: in the UK, just under half the population has chosen to pledge to love another person as long as they both shall live, or as long as they don’t get divorced. And yet as we shoehorn ourselves into two-by-two formation, we’re not that good at keeping our promises: as Helen Croydon has pointed out, breaking the boundaries of monogamy is far from unusual. Plenty of marriages have three people in them. They’re just not legal ones.A good old-fashioned monogamous marriage works beautifully for some. But even the most successful marriages are special and unique and incredibly weird. For much as we have a sweet collective imagining of what a happy union entails, the reality is that they all deviate from the fantasy norm, pretty much from the time that the certificate is signed, the chicken is noshed and the bouquet is chucked. The government can dictate that two people should be in a marriage, but it can’t legislate what will make them feel happy or stable or emotionally complete together. And if we accept that, as we do every time we allow anyone the freedom to make a decision about who they’ll marry, and furthermore allow them the freedom to call each other by execrable pet names in public, then does it not begin to seem strange, just a bit, that we do allow the government to dictate how many people are allowed to pledge to be together forever? Perhaps even as strange as it is for government to dictate who can do it based on their gender?This is not about the advocacy of patriarchal polygamy that regards wives as unequal to, or property of, their husbands. But if three, or four, or 17 people want to marry each other simultaneously and equally, why should they not be granted the same status as two people who want to become a legal family? Without reverting to religious arguments, or logistical ones (does Ikea manufacture a big enough bed to accommodate this union?), it begins to feel a bit illiberal.Is it possible that if we allowed more people to marry simultaneously that more marriages might be successful? Fewer breakups over infidelity might occur, for example, if those who found themselves in love with more than one person didn’t have to choose or conceal their feelings. And relaxing the expectation that one partner should fulfil all of one’s needs – good sex, complementary taste in television and shared preference for dogs over cats may just be too much to ask for – might mean that people who opt for a portfolio of other halves (or thirds) could outdo the rest of us in happiness.Legalisation wouldn’t send stampedes of people to the registry office in five-aside squads; for many of us, monogamy does feel the most comfortable option, whether it’s because our brains aren’t wired to love more than one person or because the prospect of making multiple people happy is too complex. But three’s not a crowd for everyone. And as long as everyone is entering a marriage equally, as long as everyone is really going to make an effort to be open and honest to everyone else, it’s probably not the government’s job to tell them how many of them there should be.http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/aug/30/three-people-get-married-thruplelast_img read more

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