EBFA/RHTY&SC Female 5-A-Side: Pink Queens emerge champs, Lizzann Lavroux is MVP

first_imgTHE East Bank Football Association (EBFA) in association with the Rose Hall Town Youth and Sports Club last Sunday held a one-day Female 5-a-side football competition to encourage the development of the game in the association.Emerging as champs in the two best-of-three matches were Pink Queens who blew away Green Queens, two matches to nil. Led by hat-tricks from sisters Latifah and Lizzann Lavroux, the Green Queens hammered Pink Queens 8-3 in the first match at the Kuru Kururu ground.Also scoring for the winners were Candace Fraser and Ronetta Grant. Pink Team scorers were Aalliyah Thomas, Shaniya Edwards and Nikita Winter.The second match saw the Pink Team take first strike through a Nikita Winter goal but that advantage was eventually cancelled out in the second half through goals from Aaliyah David and Candace Fraser as the Green Team stormed to their second success to win the competition.MVP Lizzann Lavroux (left) receives her cycle from EBFA Assistant Secretary/Treasurer Abigale Scott.Both teams were presented with trophies while each participating player received a medal. Emerging as the Most Valuable Player-of-the-Day was Lizzann Lavroux who was presented with a brand new cycle, compliments of the day’s sponsor, Rose Hall Town Youth and Sports Club (RHTY&SC).The EBFA is expressing thanks to the RHTY&SC for its partnership in supporting the development of women’s football also to all the players who participated as well as the parents and coaches.last_img read more

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Syracuse excels in power play offense, defense

first_imgFreshman forward Jessica Sibley has scored nine goals this season for a share of the team lead.But it was her power play goal in the first period of Friday night’s game that extended the Orange’s division-leading mark to 24.For the Orange (12-9-2, 4-4-2 College Hockey America), the power play has been a usable tool to exploit its opponents’ weaknesses. When on the advantage, the foundation for SU’s power play success comes down to two things.“We’re best on the power play when we move the puck quickly and connect on tape-to-tape passes,” Sibley said.With Sibley’s goal, Syracuse has now converted on at least one power play opportunity in each of its last seven games.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIt has become a daily routine for the team to split up into two squads during practice, with each team alternating focus on defending and converting power plays.Head coach Paul Flanagan attributes his team’s success on the power play to its ability to move the puck around and produce quality shots while on the advantage.“[The power play] is the kind of play where we’re trying to get the goalie moving side-to-side and get the killers in transition,” Flanagan said. “Sometimes we’re very predictable in that strategy and it doesn’t always work out.”The occasional struggle for Syracuse on the power play could perhaps be attributed to being overambitious or energized, according to junior forward Allie LaCombe. In addition, she acknowledges the high intensity of each power play scenario.“One bad pass breaks down everything and you go back to the other end and start all over,” LaCombe said. “It’s all about controlling our energy and making good passes.”On paper, Syracuse has looked almost equally impressive defending as it has possessing the power play. SU has yielded 18 goals on the penalty kill, which is good enough for second best in the conference.Flanagan’s goal of a 90 percent penalty kill has been unobtainable for Syracuse so far this season. Despite allowing a power play goal Friday against Rochester Institute of Technology, Syracuse has maintained a respectable 84 percent kill rate on opponents’ power play opportunities.“On the penalty kill, it’s a lot of hard work on our side,” Flanagan said. “It’s all about staying in shooting lanes and making sure we’re determined in blocking shots.“The old adage goes that your goalie is the best penalty killer on the ice.”Indeed, SU keeper Jenesica Drinkwater has been a vital part of the counter attack, responsible for allowing only eight power play goals this season.As she’s quarterbacked the Orange’s defense, Drinkwater has helped the shorthanded SU squad whittle down the remaining seconds of each penalty kill.“Blocking shots is our number one goal,” Drinkwater said. “The more shots we block on defense, the easier it is on me in the goal.”Drinkwater faces a unique battle on the ice during each penalty kill. She reiterated the challenge of keeping her eyes on the puck at all times after yielding a power play goal on a shot she couldn’t get a glimpse at.The senior goalie is the last line of defense for a defensive unit that prides itself on debunking the opposition’s power play.Junior defenseman Kaillie Goodnough is one of several important killers for the Orange and had a scaled down interpretation of SU’s penalty kill.“We all just need to bear down,” Goodnough said. “Working harder never hurt anyone.” Comments Published on January 22, 2014 at 1:43 am Contact Connor: cgrossma@syr.edu | @connorgrossman Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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USC interns contribute to Los Angeles mayoral campaigns

first_imgDespite the end of the 2012 presidential election, many of USC’s more politically minded students have chosen to continue in their campaigning efforts, this time on a local scale in the 2013 Los Angeles mayoral race.Candidates in action · City Controller Wendy Greuel and city councilmembers Jan Perry and Eric Garcetti respond to questions from South L.A. union members and community residents Thursday night at Ward AME Church. The primary election will take place on March 5.– William Ehart | Daily TrojanWith five major candidates vying for the office currently held by outgoing mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, the campaigns have focused heavily on some of the biggest municipal issues, such as local job creation, the public education system and environmental regulation. But elections aren’t won with just words.The ability to mobilize supporters to vote is critical to the success of any campaign, which is exactly what several Trojans have committed to doing through internships with the various candidates.Many students who are passionate about politics, such as Kaya Masler, a junior majoring in English and political science, have found interning to be another outlet for their political interests.“I’ve always loved local politics,” said Masler, who interns for Greuel’s campaign. “[It’s] very exciting to be a part of it all.”According to Masler, the day-to-day work of the campaign involves everything from making phone calls to voters to organizing official endorsements. Greuel, currently serving as city controller, has gained tremendous momentum following endorsements from major figures such as U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer. Yet the most rewarding part of Masler’s experience has been getting to know the candidate personally.“I think that looking up to our leaders is something that is so lost to us these days,” Masler said. “But Wendy is one person who I can not only look up to, but who also looks at me like a friend.”Ashlyn Beierle, a junior majoring in political science currently interning for city councilmember Jan Perry’s campaign, felt the same way. Beierle found her internship through USC’s Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics.“I really appreciate Jan’s commitment to the private sector, which she addressed at the debate,” said Beierle, referring to the mayoral debate at UCLA’s Royce Hall on Monday.Beierle, who plans on pursuing a law degree, spends 10 to 15 hours a week communicating with constituents and walking precincts to help inform Angelenos of Perry’s platform points.For Omeed Anvar, a junior studying business administration and political science, there is never a boring day on the campaign trail. Anvar has spent his time working for city councilmember Eric Garcetti’s campaign, conducting policy research and sending out press clips through the campaign’s communications department.“I love that no two days are the same,” Anvar said. “I’m always doing new jobs for the campaign.”After working for Sen. Boxer’s office last spring, Anvar sought to become involved in Garcetti’s campaign, which he admires for its innovative use of technology in the political process. Garcetti recently participated in a Reddit “AMA,” answering questions posted directly by voters.Because the mayoral race is  so localized, Anvar said campus engagement can have a big impact on election results.“It is so important that USC students get out and vote in the election,” Anvar said. “We are such a large student body and can have a huge impact on who gets put in local office.”Though each backs different candidates, Masler, Beierle and Anvar all expressed a serious interest in remaining involved in political campaigns, and possibly even in seeking public office themselves one day.A citywide primary election will be held on Tuesday, March 5. Any candidate receiving a majority in the primary will automatically become the next mayor of Los Angeles. Otherwise, the top two vote-getters will advance to the general election held on Tuesday, May 21.Students can register to vote for the Los Angeles mayoral election online at sos.ca.gov/elections by Feb. 25 for the primary election and May 19 for the statewide direct primary.last_img read more

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UW overcomes slow starts to bury UND

first_imgThe Wisconsin women’s hockey team had its struggles in the weekend series, but was resilient and managed to win both games, keeping its unbeaten streak alive after a 3-2 victory over North Dakota Sunday.UND played great defense for the majority of the series. The Sioux held the Badgers to just three total goals in the first two periods of both games, and North Dakota was relentless with the pressure it put on Wisconsin’s offense.“They were pressuring us,” head coach Mark Johnson said. “That was probably the most difficult thing. Our kids were probably hanging on the puck a little bit too long.”“I think towards the end we were just trying to put everything on the net, and maybe in the first two periods we were being a little too fancy with the puck,” forward and captain Hilary Knight saidIt’s early in the season, and incoming freshmen are still adapting to a new team. UW also had five players return from Team Canada’s fall training camp to play in their first games with the Badgers this season. These circumstances didn’t help Wisconsin find an offensive rhythm, but it showed it has the talent to overcome tough situations.Despite slow starts, the Badgers showed great physical and mental toughness that ultimately won them the series.In Sunday’s game, they managed to stay within a point of UND and gave themselves an opportunity to tie the game on a power play. Assistant captain Brooke Ammerman took advantage of the situation with a rebound goal in front of the net with about a minute left in regulation. The score paved the way for Hilary Knight’s game-winning goal in overtime.Wisconsin’s toughness in crucial situations showed why they hold the No. 1 ranking in the nation.“I think it’s just our history of going through adversity and battling and never giving up,” Ammerman said. “I think coach (Johnson) does a great job of instilling in us that it’s never over. We’ve learned that. We’ve been on the bad side and the good side of that as well. They played us very tough, but we were able to get out of it with the win.”Although not as stressful as on Sunday, the Badgers faced a similar test in Saturday’s game. They were tied at one late into the second period, until forward Carolyne Pr?vost scored to shift the momentum back in Wisconsin’s favor for the remainder of the game. The Badgers scored three more goals in the third period to cruise to a 5-2 victory.In both games, UW faced moments where its offense stalled for a period of time, but it persevered and found a way to put enough points up to win. The wins against UND are important ones in a tough Western Collegiate Hockey Association conference.“You’ve got two points in your bank, and we all know in the second half of the season those are tough to come by,” Johnson said. “Certainly, the victory today is very meaningful and certainly will help us with our confidence, but more importantly, it gives us two points that they can’t take away from us.”Sunday’s win extends Wisconsin’s unbeaten streak to 31 games, which is just one shy of the NCAA record of 32 games set by the Badgers back in 2007.last_img read more

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Big Tipperary interest in Navan card

first_imgThe first race goes to post at 1.55, but the Tipp involvement doesn’t begin until 2.55, when Aidan O Brien’s Ruby Tuesday will run against the Joseph Murphy trained Drop the Subject and Everlasting Spring, watched over by David Nagle. In all O Brien has 9 horses running today.The 3.25 run holds the most local interest, with 9 Premier County competitors. Aidan O’Brien will saddle up 3 runners in this one – Diamond Bangle, Easter and On A Pedastal. They will run alongside the David Wachman duo of Curvy and Gussy Goose and the David Marnane trained Ciel Etoile, while Charlie Swan has Rolanna. MJ Tynan’s Darkan completes Tipp involvement.In the 3.55, David Marnane’s Sheba will be competing with 3 more of Aidan O Brien’s charges, Jinsha Lake, King of Aragon and Giovanni Canaletto. O Brien will also have Bazaar in the 5 o clock. Denis Hogan’s Amazing Star goes up against TJ O Mara’s Castle Bar Sling in the Meath Handicap, which gets underway at half 4.Tipp involvement is completed in the final race of the day at half 5, which sees David Wachman’s Senior Counsel in competition with Aidan O’Brien’s ninth and last runner of the day, Felix Mendelssohn.last_img read more

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Winning Post: Crouch bows out with “alternative facts”

first_img Share Winning Post: Swedish regulator pushes back on ‘Storebror’ approach to deposit limits August 24, 2020 StumbleUpon Share Regulus Partners, the strategic consultancy focused on international gambling and related industries, takes a look at some key developments for the gambling industry in its ‘Winning Post’ column.UK: Politics – Crouch bows out with “alternative facts”Last week’s resignation of Tracey Crouch as UK minister for sport (and gambling) marked a new low in the recent history of Britain’s gaming and betting industry. Whether one views Crouch’s decision as a noble stand on a matter of conscience or as a futile act of petulance, it is hard to identify any good that will come from it. Her resignation seems to contain so many of the problems that have bedevilled attempts at sane policy in this sector for so long – myopic lobbying (on all sides), political dithering, bullying and unpleasantness and the triumph of emotion over reason.Whether one agrees with Crouch’s views on gambling regulation, she has undeniably been the most engaged gambling minister that we have had for at least a decade. In contrast to most of her predecessors in the role, she appeared to care and she did her best to make a good job of a thankless brief (as well as being a tireless and effective champion of sport). Her departure seems likely to set back the industry’s relationship with the Government, has caused further damage to its public image and – possibly most seriously in practical terms – may well deter her successor from investing much in the way of personal political capital in this fraught area of politics.It is difficult to fathom what precisely caused the Member for Chatham and Aylesford to resign. As a backbencher, she had expressed concern about machines in betting shops (a concern that even the ABB seems to have now accepted was justified – whether or not it agrees with the £2 stake solution). Once she was put in a position to do something about it, she pursued the matter with vigour (in contrast to many of her peers who find that with great power comes great amnesia) despite the shifting sands of Cabinet reshuffles that saw her serve three Culture Secretaries in as many years (including her maternity leave).Given the length of time it took to achieve the goal of stake reduction (15 years on from the old Gaming Board’s first attempt to rein in FOBTs), it seems somewhat perverse that Crouch should step down over the question of whether the coup de grace should be delivered in April or October next year. It is difficult to avoid the conclusion that the six month ‘delay’ was simply the final straw – the point of divergence with ministerial colleagues that sapped the last reserves of her patience.What happens next is anyone’s guess – the entire FOBT saga has had more twists and turns than Chubby Checker on the Cresta Run. No sooner had we thought that the matter had been put to bed than it has leapt back out again. It seems hard to believe that the Government will change the timing of FOBT stake reduction but if Crouch’s stand galvanises the support of enough disaffected Tories (Boris Johnson, Iain Duncan Smith and Sarah Wollaston have been among the more high-profile Conservatives to speak out on the subject this week) then Labour may scent (another) chance to embarrass the Government on gambling policy. However, a further ironical twist could be that a stand against the timetable could push out the timetable further – a calculation the government (and perhaps GVC) is possibly banking on to see legislation passed in a timely manner.The question of who will replace Crouch as sports minister has wider implications for the industry – and the balance of risk is on the downside here. The episode has damaged the reputation of the new Culture Secretary, Jeremy Wright (indeed, it is not inconceivable that he might be moved on) and is almost certain to accentuate his allergy to gambling matters. It is critical that operators start to find positive ways to engage with Government (for example, how they might contribute to a more vibrant post-Brexit Britain) in order to eradicate the stain of years of whining, discord and controversy.Tracey Crouch’s resignation letter provided another warning of a deeper and darker threat to gambling in Britain (and elsewhere). In explaining her decision to step down, she stated that “two people will tragically take their lives every day due to gambling-related problems”. This seems to be an entirely bogus claim, yet it is now being repeated with such unquestioning conviction and regularity that it is fast becoming accepted as a fact. We will return to this subject in more detail at a later time. For now, we simply observe that it is disappointing that in her final act as minister she should perpetuate such palpable nonsense (the claim seems to be based entirely upon the deaths of 17 people in Hong Kong more than a decade ago).Our aim here is not to trivialise the subject of gambling-related suicide – it is an extremely serious and tragic issue – but to point out that simply because we don’t know how many people take their own lives in relation to gambling problems does not justify making things up, just as it does not permit the industry to downplay the issue. Those in positions of regulatory-political authority have an ethical duty to deal in facts rather than peddle hysteria.For operators globally, the challenge is clearly to do a much better job of understanding and addressing harms – both in relation to those experienced by customers; and the damage to their own long-term interests when societal concerns are allowed to become headline news. For now, the damage still appears to be mounting faster than the attempts at repair.UK: in Parliament – Play School Politics Pans FOBT FiascoTracey Crouch’s final week at the DCMS was a certainly busy one. In his Budget Statement on Monday, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Philip Hammond set the rate of Remote Gaming Duty at 21% (slightly higher than expected; somewhat lower than feared) with the change due to take effect from October next year (to coincide with stake reduction on FOBTs).The gambling concern lobby had made it clear that they would oppose any later date than April 2019 for action on FOBTs; and had set their traps accordingly. Anticipating disappointment, Lord Griffiths of Burryport (Lab) had already scheduled a debate for Tuesday on the timing of stake in reduction. Concerns were expressed about both FOBTs and TV advertising but the debate was rather tame by comparison with what was to come.In the Commons that day, the chair of the Health Select Committee (and former GP), Sarah Wollaston (Cons, Totnes), the Shadow Health Minister, Jonathan Ashworth (Lab, Leicester South) and Paul Blomfield (Lab, Sheffield Central) used a debate on income tax to deliver strongly worded criticisms of the Government’s decision to wait another year (Iain Duncan Smith used a further debate on income tax two days later to the same effect).Thursday brought DCMS oral Parliamentary Questions. The Labour and SNP Shadow Ministers for DCMS, Kevin Brennan (Lab, Cardiff West) and Hannah Bardell (SNP, Livingston) put the Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright on the spot in relation to the perceived delay on stake reduction. Wright insisted that there had been no delay and that the date for implementation of the new regulations had actually been brought forward from April 2020.However, Wright was not to escape that easily. Later in the day, Labour’s Deputy Leader cornered the Culture Secretary with an Urgent Question on the timing of stake reduction, precipitating a prolonged debate, involving MPs from all major parties. Perhaps significantly, around half of the 20 MPs who criticised the Government during the debate were from its own party.In addition to a range of questions on FOBTS, Watson repeatedly asked Wright whether or not his sports minister, Tracey Crouch had resigned (as press reports had suggested). As he bobbed and weaved in response to questioning, Wright extolled the “outstanding job” that Crouch was doing as sports minister and denied that the commercial interests of the betting shop sector had any influence on the timing of stake reduction. It is likely to have been a source of some embarrassment to Wright that within hours of the debate, his “outstanding” minister had indeed tendered her resignation to the Prime Minister and claimed that her personal commitment to the role was incompatible with “commitments made by others to those with registered interests”.The situation in the House of Lords was also proving rather dicey for the Government. Labour’s Lord Stevenson of Balmacara and the Liberal Democrat Lord Clement-Jones branded the decision to wait until October 2019 before implementing the £2 stake maximum “a disgrace”. This was followed by a rather longer debate on gambling addiction (led by the Bishop of Portsmouth, standing in for the bookie-bashing Bishop of St Albans). Impassioned testimony on the harms of excessive gambling was drawn from a large number of peers. The ensuing discussion roamed free across the wide range of controversies that currently dog the industry, including TV advertising, sports sponsorship, funding for research, education and treatment and even little old bingo which Lord Stevenson described as “that used to be a social game for grannies, but it now seems to be a way into the wider world of gambling because of the opt-in payments and the ability to get on to it” (no, we’re not sure what this means, either).The Liberal Democrat Shadow Attorney General, Lord Thomas of Gresford left the House gave full vent to his antipathy towards the industry, depicting operators in distinctly Transylvanian tones. “These gambling companies constantly look for new blood to suck”, he said. His party colleague – and former children’s TV presenter, Baroness Benjamin drew attention to issues of gambling participation and problem gambling among children and gambling-related debt for university students. It is perhaps a sign of the low pass that the industry has reached that Humpty’s, Jemima’s and Big Ted’s best mate is now on gambling’s case.UK: horseracing – one each end and steady as we go…Betfred and Alizeti have now secured the original Tote’s long-term future on British racecourses, in a now predictable denoument to the Britbet saga in the form of a seven-year £50m deal. The latest plot twist therefore ends us back at the beginning of a story even Moliere would find too contrived and farcical to be believed. First the Tote was sidelined in favour of a new pool operated by the courses (Britbet) to have been launched on removal of the Tote’s monopoly status in July 2018, in turn causing Fred to remove all his non-contractual support for racing. The first ripple against (most of) GB racecourses’ plan occurred when Ascot confirmed it would not be joining Britbet; following which Britbet secured a temporary deal with the existing Tote from July 2018. An unexpected curve ball then arrived in the form of a 25% stake purchase by Alizeti Capital, and now finally the Fred-Alizeti Tote has secured its historical (and liquidity critical) on-course position with increased financial firepower and strategic drive (or at least hope of such).The Alizeti-backed Tote has promised a “double Levy” as well as planning to reducing deductions (increasing the payout ratio). These are noble sentiments, but so far significantly increased prize money in GB has not led to a better betting product (more runners, more competitive racing), so there is a clear danger of low productivity spending, in our view (however popular with some stakeholders). Equally, increasing prizes is a good way to stimulate gambling if targeted to recycling participants who are happy to be net losers, though this is not how the pool is typically played anymore: increased prizes which end up in the pockets of lucky punters playing at long-odds and rebaters are unlikely to stimulate sustainable demand. Plans to revitalise the Tote are welcome and much needed – but none of the levers are simple or all that well connected after years of poor management and significantly increased competition, in our view (with much of the reported ‘GB’ Tote revenue increases in GC stats being international rebaters, we believe) – a bold vision needs much more than throwing good money after bad, or the only winner will be the wily bookmaker from Warrington…Australia: online regulation – effective disruption?The ACMA has released its first annual report on enforcement progress of the amended Internet Gaming Act 2001, which became effective in September 2017 and strengthened the ban on in-play and gaming, as well as providing a legal framework for anti-offshore measures (prohibition enforcement, including for services and advertising; deterrent and disruption tools; consumer awareness). The ACMA’s Task Force (IGT) has spent the first twelve months contacting overseas regulators (POC and POS), operators and suppliers (platform, content, payments, affiliates, etc), principally flagging the ‘reinforced’ illegality of offshore supply, in-play and gaming, as well as the determination to enforce. Combined with this broad approach, 62 specific investigations were conducted, with 38 breaches identified and a 68% compliance track record on identified breaches so far – with the remainder escalated to Federal authorities (border protection, courts). Thirty-thee software providers and 10 PSPs were also notified, both of the legal change and potential liability under the Act. The reported impact of this activity has been 33 of Australia’s ‘most popular’ offshore sites ceasing to accept Australian customers of 56 site exits measured (of a 138 site sample). These are clearly material interventions, even in a potential market of c. 700 betting operators (albeit some with shared ownership) and at least double the number of gaming operators.So can the ACMA claim victory? Certainly in part. Some big brands have exited the market and the fact that many but not all exited on the passage of the Act demonstrates that the enforcement threat has been an important component. Further, broader media awareness and restricted payment options will undoubtedly make mass market penetration difficult. Consequently, the IGT has almost certainly reduced mass market participation in offshore gambling and is likely to arrest the adoption curve going forward. However, we doubt that many harder gamblers have been disrupted, making the revenue impact perhaps less than the ACMA believes. Enforcement pressure is also likely to mount with growing channel shift and diminishing consumer choice caused by the fiscal-regulatory framework. In the short/medium-term, however, the big winner is horseracing, which does not face domestic competition from either in-play or gaming; distorting the market even for racing-mad Australians.Herein lies a key question for regulators and enforcement tools. If the job is to be measured in participation rates, then Australia’s actions can be seen as at least partly successful, though the march of channel shift on a AU$17.7m landbased gaming market can only be slowed, not halted, in our view (tellingly the Australian betting market is only 22% the size of this and already 65% online for domestically regulated supply). If the job is measured in revenue (awkwardly invisible for offshore supply), then Australia’s actions are unlikely to have dented activity much beyond poker (which requires large business participation to deliver the required liquidity), in our view. There is of course a logic for regulators to focus on influencing the largest populations – but it is in harder gambling cohorts that many of the social problems and most of the potential taxes are likely to be found…US: DFS regulation – the Big Apple takes a toothless bite out of DFSA New York State Judge has ruled that DFS games violate the state constitution, challenging the 2016 Fantasy Sports Law (which stated DFS was not gambling and provided an oversite and tax framework). While the ruling has inevitably caused some concern given NY’s importance to the DFS market, we suspect there will be little practical effect at this stage. First, the state is likely to appeal, which would (or should) provide a stay while this takes place. Second, the judge recognised the elements of the 2016 DFS law that exempted the product from the definition of gambling under state penal law – which gives operators cover to continue. The (not very) worst case scenario therefore appears to be status quo during either an appeal process or a constitutional amendment. However, this process might all be made moot if New York legislates for sports betting in the meantime, which is likely to both deal with the constitutional issues of gambling in state and make DFS a far less relevant product.A perhaps more relevant if less reported court ruling occurred in Indiana last week, which found that DFS providers were not violating sports players IP through use of data, since it constituted “material that has newsworthy value”. While dangerous to extrapolate (across states or product groups), this would seem close to the critical difference between data and database rights in Europe – which might explain why US sports leagues are so keen to get some form of specific statutory value transfer rather than relying on IP. Nevertheless, while such an interpretation might make the free use of a lot of sports data possible, in-play data is likely to require the cooperation of the leagues, and this is increasingly where digital value is likely to sit as states regulate sportsbetting (where allowed).Ireland: TV sports rights – time to phone a friend…Former rivals, Sky and BT Sport have further strengthened the content sharing deal agreed last December, by extending it to Ireland. The agreement adds BT Sport to the Sky platform of channels allowing subscribers the ability to view all Premiership and Championship Football in one place. This additional arrangement, follows a similar content sharing between Sky and Channel 4 for Formula 1 arranged in September this year.The changing viewing habits from TV to streaming and OTT platforms, combined with record rights figures for sports in particular, is forcing mainstream TV and cable channels to fight for market share – forcing even long-term rivals to consider collaborations and mergers (Disney – Fox). Collaboration is a logical response to declining viewing figures in traditional channels, though it does not yet create the corollary of proving the OTT economic model (especially if rights inflation continues): the future remains dynamic and highly uncertain for all stakeholders, but broadcasters in particular, in our view. Related Articles Submit Winning Post: Third time’s the charm for England’s casinos August 17, 2020 UKGC launches fourth National Lottery licence competition August 28, 2020last_img read more

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Balotelli: Racists pick on me for being black and rebellious

first_imgItaly striker Mario Balotelli believes the presence of overt racism in his homeland means he is the target for more criticism and abuse because of his skin colour.The 23-year-old former Manchester City forward said if he was white he would be treated more sympathetically by his compatriots.Balotelli, whose name was never far from the headlines during his stay in England, was racially abused by fans at a national team training camp last week.Last year he was targeted by Roma fans while playing for AC Milan and said afterwards he would walk off the pitch if he encountered it again.”They aren’t used to seeing people who are different, not white, who act not as rebels but normally,” he told the July edition of GQ magazine.”I think what the ignorant people don’t like is that people who are different are allowed to act that way.”These stupid people, they get angry with me, they say horrible things, but I haven’t done anything different from other people. “I have made mistakes, like everyone does, and I have always paid for my mistakes.”I think that if I was white maybe some people would still find me irritating or annoying but it wouldn’t be the same. Absolutely not.”Jealousy is a horrible thing, but when this jealousy is towards people who are different from the majority, and who maybe also have more than you, then it becomes anger, it becomes rage, and that’s the overt racism.”Balotelli said while racism was not restricted just to Italy and Spain, he accepted it was more publicly prevalent.Asked whether he had experienced overt racism while playing for City he added: “Not open, no. At City, just after I joined, we were on a plane going on tour somewhere and I looked around and I realised there were more black players than white players on the team. “That was a big difference. That was kind of amazing. In Italy I was often the only one.”Racism is everywhere. Maybe it is more open here, or in Spain. There are racists in England but I think they hide it more.”Balotelli felt much more could be done in the battle against racism but did not want to be the one seen to be leading the fight on his own without the formation of a sustainable campaign.”I know people are fighting this thing, and it’s important, but in the media every time I have talked about this subject people talk about it for three or four days but then everything goes back to normal,” he said.”So, either there is something really strong for all of us to do, some real movement or real action, and in that case I will be the first guy to participate, but if it’s just talk, I’d rather not. “We can talk about it as much as we want but things don’t change that way.”When there will be something real and strong to really help people and society, and really help people who have less than me, then I will help.”Were Balotelli’s goals to fire Italy to victory at the World Cup this summer he would become a national hero, but the striker thinks that would miss the point.”It’s really sad to think that we can change Italy only by winning the World Cup. I hope we can change things even if we don’t win it,” he added.last_img read more

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Clippers guard Austin Rivers out at least 2 more weeks with ankle impingement

first_imgLOS ANGELES — Upon further examination, shooting guard Austin Rivers has a right posterior ankle impingement and will be sidelined for at least two more weeks, the Clippers announced before Thursday’s game against the Oklahoma City Thunder at Staples Center.In layman’s terms, he has soreness in his heel and Achilles tendon area. Rest is the best treatment.Rivers sat out for the third consecutive game after he was injured in the third quarter of the Clippers’ Dec. 29 victory over the Lakers. He could miss seven more games. The Clippers initially diagnosed the injury as a sore right Achilles tendon.“It’s not the best news, obviously,” Clippers coach Doc Rivers said. “He’ll be evaluated in two weeks, which doesn’t sound great right now. So, I think we’ll find out a lot more in a couple of weeks. Listen, this is what we’ve been doing all year. Someone else will step up for us. “This year has just been crazy,” Doc Rivers said. “We’ve had one guy out (in past seasons), but I don’t think I’ve ever seen anything quite like this, not only where there’s injuries, but they’re to all the scorers and the playmakers. It’s just been one of those years.“I love this team. They understand we’ve had all these injuries. It’s a great group to coach. They just play hard. We have never had more game plans in my career, where one night we want to run and one night we want to (do something else). It’s just been fun to coach, in that way, I guess.”The Clippers’ six injured players have been sidelined for a combined 98 games.BEVERLEY UPDATEThe Clippers expect Beverley to rejoin the team next week and continue his rehabilitation work in Los Angeles. Beverley said in a series of recent tweets that he tossed away his crutches, started walking under his own power and began his rehab work in his hometown of Houston.Doc Rivers said he looked forward to Beverley’s return.“He can instigate the opponents from the bench during the games,” Doc Rivers said, laughing. “I have a feeling he’ll be doing a lot of that. I’ve never seen a guy who engages more people from the bench. … Pat has a way about him. He’s great for our team even if he’s not playing.“He’s one of those guys where his toughness rubs off on everyone around him, his mental toughness does. So, I think he’ll be good for us.” “Because they have to. That’s what we’ve been doing and that’s what we’ll do.”C.J. Williams started in place of Austin Rivers on Thursday for the second consecutive game. Williams, a 27-year-old rookie on a two-way contract, scored a career-high 18 points in the Clippers’ victory over the Memphis Grizzlies on Tuesday, their fourth consecutive win.Rivers went to the sideline as power forward Blake Griffin returned from a 14-game layoff because of a sprained left knee. Meanwhile, small forward Danilo Gallinari continues to be sidelined by a torn left gluteus maximus muscle. There is no timetable for his return to the lineup.Doc Rivers has had his full lineup healthy and available to play for only 1½ games. Point guard Milos Teodosic suffered a plantar fascia injury in his left foot in the first half of their second game of the season, an Oct. 21 victory over the Phoenix Suns.In addition to Gallinari, Griffin, Rivers and Teodosic, the Clippers also were without Wesley Johnson for five games because of a sore left foot. Plus, shooting guard Patrick Beverley underwent season-ending right knee surgery Nov. 22.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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NHL Rumor Roundup: Jason Zucker’s days with Wild numbered after near-trade to Flames

first_imgShortly after the deadline, however, TSN’s Darren Dreger reported the Flames came close to acquiring Minnesota Wild winger Jason Zucker. The Athletic’s Michael Russo said the deal would’ve sent winger Michael Frolik and a draft pick to the Wild in return for Zucker. Frolik has a partial no-trade clause but the Wild were not on his “no” list.Russo speculated Zucker’s contract may have been difficult for the Flames to absorb. He’s signed through 2022-23 with an annual cap hit of $5.5 million. For whatever reason, no trade call was made and nothing was sent to the league’s central registry before the deadline.That Zucker was close to going to Calgary raises questions about his future in Minnesota. Since mid-January, Wild general manager Paul Fenton has shaken up his core forwards, shipping Nino Niederreiter to Carolina for Victor Rask, Charlie Coyle to Boston for Ryan Donato and Mikael Granlund to Nashville for Kevin Fiala.Fenton re-signed Zucker last summer to his current contract but the 27-year-old is performing well below last season’s 33 goals and 64 points. With the Wild struggling through the first half of the season, the GM felt his roster revamp was in order.Since his recent moves, the Wild has won five of their last six games entering Tuesday’s tilt with the Nashville Predators and still cling to a wild card spot in the Western Conference. Should they remain hot down the stretch and clinch a playoff berth, perhaps Fenton will decide against further roster tinkering this summer. Then again, missing the postseason, or another opening-round exit, could convince Fenton to keep shaking things up — maybe revisiting the Flames interest in Zucker once the playoffs are overs.If Fenton wants to trade Zucker this summer, he’ll have a limited window for unfettered movement. The winger’s modified no-trade clause kicks in July 1, limiting potential trade destinations.Larsson to Toronto?On June 26, 2016, the Edmonton Oilers shocked the hockey world by shipping left wing Taylor Hall to the New Jersey Devils straight up for defenseman Adam Larsson. Following last week’s trade deadline, the Edmonton Journal’s David Staples noted a report out of Boston claiming the Oilers discussed a deal that would’ve sent Larsson to the Toronto Maple Leafs.The rumor had the Oilers and Leafs considering a larger deal that would’ve sent Larsson to Toronto with right wing Connor Brown heading to Edmonton. However, there were a lot of moving pieces and nothing came of it.Staples, however, cited Oilers insider Bob Stauffer’s claim that Larsson’s name never came up in any of the club’s trade discussions.  Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman reports the Oilers and Leafs discussed a swap of Brown for defenseman Matt Benning but that fell through. He also confirms sources saying Larsson’s name never came up.NHL trade deadline winners, losers: Flames go home empty-handedIf the Oilers were to move Larsson they’ll certainly want more than a depth forward like Brown in return. Given their limited depth in skilled blueliners, it’ll take considerably more (perhaps a first-line right wing) to tempt them into moving him.Kings Set High Asking Price for ToffoliThe Los Angeles Kings were among the notable sellers leading up to this year’s trade deadline. Over the course of the season, they sent Tanner Pearson to Pittsburgh for Carl Hagelin, peddled Hagelin to Washington and dealt Jake Muzzin to Toronto, Nate Thompson to Montreal and Oscar Fantenberg to Calgary.Right wing Tyler Toffoli was thought to be another Kings trade candidate. A versatile two-way forward with three 40-plus point seasons on his resume, the 26-year-old was rumored to be drawing interest around the league. Can’t get enough NHL rumors? Lyle Richardson’s Rumor Roundup column serves as a one-stop guide to the latest rumblings around the league.Zucker Next Out Of Minnesota?The Calgary Flames raised some eyebrows with limited activity at last week’s NHL trade deadline. Rumored to be in the market for a top-six right wing, the Flames instead acquired depth defenseman Oscar Fantenberg from the Los Angeles Kings. Toffoli passed the deadline without being moved, probably because of the Kings’ high asking price. Friedman reports they sought a first-round pick and a good prospect “at least”.Friedman also said the Kings retained Toffoli in hopes he’ll regain his 30-goal form. He’s under contract through 2019-20 and due to become an unrestricted free agent next summer. That could still make him a tempting trade target this summer if someone is willing to meet the Kings’ price.last_img read more

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Danny Garcia still ‘in the mix’ for big bouts after Errol Spence Jr. fight was dashed

first_imgJoin DAZN and watch more than 100 fight nights a yearBy now, boxing fans are well aware that the two-division world champion was supposed to be fighting Errol Spence Jr. But Spence suffered a horrific one-car crash in October and although he miraculously survived, any thoughts of the bout happening during the first quarter of 2020 were shelved indefinitely.Garcia had to move on.“It was a tragic accident, so it wasn’t bad (for me) mentally,” Garcia tells Sporting News. “It wasn’t like I did eight weeks of training camp and he broke his hand like a week before or like, he got an illness or something and couldn’t fight. Then, I would have probably been upset.“But I didn’t even start training yet, so it wasn’t that hard to just adapt,” he continues. “I just knew that mentally, I wanted to fight on Jan. 25.”And that’s precisely what Garcia is doing, but instead of vying for Spence’s unified IBF/WBC world welterweight crown, he’s fighting Redkach in a WBC title eliminator. A win and he’ll be right back to knocking on Spence’s doorstep. And the 31-year-old Garcia (35-2, 21 KOs) is OK with that.Prior to his accident, Spence was evoking Garcia’s name on Instagram and in interviews alike. Chances are he’ll go back to doing the same with a Garcia victory this weekend.There also continues to be back-and-forth exchanges between WBO welterweight champion Terence Crawford, his camp and Garcia.To that, Garcia throws caution to “Bud” and Top Rank.“After that last performance, I don’t know if they want to risk fighting me,” Garcia warns, referring to Crawford overcoming an arguable knockdown before eventually securing a ninth-round TKO of Egidijus Kavaliauskas in December. “No, I wasn’t (impressed).”Garcia’s name also continues to hover as a possible next opponent for WBA welterweight titleholder Manny Pacquiao.So, as he flashes a smile, “Swift” is right where he wants to be … still in the mix with his name attached to every champion at 147 pounds.“Everyone’s always mentioning my name,” he says.“I’m always in the mix because realistically I have a better resume and I’ve been in bigger fights than all those guys,” he continues, especially referring to Spence, Crawford and fellow former welterweight champs Keith Thurman and Shawn Porter.The latter two boxers are responsible for Garcia’s only two pro losses, although Garcia still maintains that he defeated Porter in their September 2018 bout, which was ruled a unanimous decision in “Showtime’s” favor.“I want that rematch and the Thurman rematch,” Garcia asserts. “I feel like I beat Porter easy. He couldn’t even touch me. I landed almost 50 percent of my (power) punches.”In hindsight, his losses to Thurman and Porter — both decided on the cards — did teach him a valuable lesson: To up his volume and be busier during fights.“I just have to be a little bit more dominant,” he offers. “Like my last fight (a seventh-round KO of Adrian Granados in April), I was dominant, I hit him hard, but I was throwing more combinations — I was throwing twos and threes. I was backing him up, I used my jab more.“And I think when I’m not in the mix, just throw something, use my jab a little bit, get some points,” he adds. “And when I touch him to the body, just might put two more upstairs. Just be a little bit more dominant.”While Garcia is eyeing a rematch with both Thurman and Porter, “Swift” is giving a second fight against “One Time” more priority.“I feel like the biggest fights for me will be the Spence, Pacquiao or Thurman fight,” he continues. “Those are the fights that I feel are the biggest fights for me and those are the fights that I want — especially the Thurman fight because I want to avenge that fight.”Garcia’s goal is to win one more title at welterweight before moving up to junior middleweight. In order to see any of this to fruition, Garcia will likely need to stop Redkach convincingly Saturday night.“He’s hungry,” Garcia says of the Ukrainian, “so I got to be on my ‘A’ game and do what I got to do to dominate him.”Redkach (23-4-1, 18 KOs) isn’t necessarily buying it. He believes the former welterweight world champ is guilty of peeking ahead to some of the aforementioned fights a little too much. And he intends to make Garcia pay for it.”The biggest weakness I see in Danny is that he’s not taking this seriously,” Redkach said Wednesday while speaking to a pool of reporters at Gleason’s boxing gym in Brooklyn. “He’s counting on this as a tune-up fight, and that’s a big mistake. This is not going to be a tune-up fight for him.”Danny is already looking ahead to a fight with Errol Spence Jr. or Manny Pacquiao, but before he gets to them, he picked me,” he says as a reminder.” I know it’s because I’m a southpaw (like Spence). But he’s going to get a rude wake up on fight night.”Having been a pro since 19-years-old, Garcia has heard it all — from champions and contenders alike. He remains unfazed and poised, as he attempts to etch the next chapters of his fighting legacy. NEW YORK — Danny Garcia saunters into a boardroom of Sporting News’ offices and takes in a pristine view of Manhattan’s skyline on this unforgivingly frigid winter day.Roughly four miles away his mug illuminates Barclays Center in Brooklyn across from Ivan Redkach, his opponent Saturday night. As Garcia sinks into a chair, he knows this isn’t the fight that was supposed to be. But he’s making the best of it with a smile on his face. “It really doesn’t matter,” Garcia says of the talk.“I’m going to be here in the long run.”Still “in the mix,” that is.last_img read more

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