Fish vendor jailed for escaping Police custody

first_imgA fish vendor was on Wednesday sentenced to spend the next two years in prison when he appeared at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts before City Magistrate Judy Latchman.Randolph ThompsonRandolph Thompson was found guilty and jailed for escaping from lawful custody.He was on trial for the offence which stated that on February 15, 2016, at the Tactical Service Unit (TSU), he escaped.According to the prosecution’s case, the 34-year-old man was at the time tasked with cutting grass in the compound of the TSU. The father of two was arrested for simple larceny.In that matter, he had pleaded not guilty to the charged which stated that on June 12, at Mandela Avenue, Georgetown, he attempted to steal a BK International truck battery valued $70,000.On June 12, he was seen by a security guard attached to the company jumping over the fence of the company’s parking lot. An alarm was raised after he was seen attempting to remove the battery from the motor vehicle.He was arrested and taken to the Ruimveldt Police Station where he was later charged. In that matter, Magistrate Fabayo Azore had found him guilty.last_img read more

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Health Ministry fire accused freed

first_imgThe man accused of setting fire to the Public Health Ministry seven years ago was set free on Tuesday after Chief Magistrate Ann McLennan deemed the prosecution’s witnesses as “not credible.”Keith FerrierKeith Ferrier was charged in July 2009 along with two others, Clayton Westford, 19, of Lot 7 West La Penitence, an Office Assistant at the Finance Ministry, and 21-year-old Tedenna Bagot, a porkknocker, of Lot 32 Second Street, Alexander Village, for unlawfully and maliciously setting fire to the Health Ministry’s Building on Brickdam.In court on Tuesday, Magistrate McLennan declared that the prosecution’s witnesses were not credible, and as such, a prima facie case was not made out against the defendant.She then dismissed all charges to the delight of Ferrier’s family members who were present in court.The Public Health Ministry on Brickdam was completely destroyed in the fire.Upon investigations, wanted bulletins were issued for the three men. However, Ferrier escaped and was hiding in neighbouring Venezuela.In was only in March of this year that Ferrier was caught and charged.last_img read more

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Canada seeks to advance Guyana’s indigenous interests

first_imgOver 200 Toshaos from across Guyana last week benefited from a partnership between Canada’s provincial Government of Alberta and the Indigenous Peoples’ Affairs Ministry which sought to leverage developments in Canada’s aboriginal communities to advance Guyana’s indigenous interests.The partnership was organised by the High Commission of Canada in collaboration with the office of Valerie Garrido-Lowe, Minister within the Indigenous Peoples’ Affairs Ministry.The Canadian delegation comprised Directors of the Aboriginal Consultation Office in Alberta, Lawrence Aimoe and Robert Kopecky.Canada is world renowned for its progress in improving the social well-being and economic prosperity of its indigenous people, and has made several strides in securing their participation in shaping its political, social and economic development at community, provincial and national levels.The visiting delegation was present at the week-long Toshaos Conference which provided them with the opportunity to better understand the local context.Members of the delegation shared Canada’s aboriginal experience in managing natural resources for the advancement of such communities. The team also presented on legislative reforms that benefit aboriginal communities and associated consultation process with aboriginals.There was heightened interest over Canadian experiences in negotiating impact agreements with businesses seeking to invest in aboriginal jurisdictions.The presenters reflected on the role of subcontracting from industry to aboriginal businesses as an important mechanism to ensure benefits accrue to the community and to align the interests of all stakeholders.Such mechanisms help to secure a stable stream of benefits from businesses to the communities, while also allowing the active participation of communities in the environmental and social performance of the business ventures.The community-business partnership helps to build business acumen in aboriginal communities with little or no experience working with industries, and this allows for knowledge transfer from community to community.The Toshaos noted that they found the peer-to-peer knowledge exchange with the Canadian delegation to be an effective mechanism which would be instrumental in helping them to derive community-owned solutions for building viable businesses, environmental protection and sustainable livelihoods. They lauded the initiative as one that helped to bridge the traditional and contemporary aboriginal worlds.Canadian companies, such as Guyana Goldfields, which are working in the Guyanese market, have been working with indigenous communities on socio-economic initiatives through partnerships with community leaders and Government offices.last_img read more

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Press Statement by SRSG Karin Landgren upon Return from Security Council Meeting

first_imgSRSG Karin Langren: Good morning.I returned to Monrovia last week from Security Council meeting on UNMIL, on 20 March.  This meeting came at the midpoint of UNMIL’s current term or mandate which began last September.The Council had before it a report from the SG dated 18 February, updating it on developments in Liberia and in UNMIL.  I would like to share with you briefly five important points that were discussed in the Council, also in my statement, on 20 March at the meeting of the Security Council.  And then I will take questions.(1)     Liberia’s security situation has remained generally stable, and the situation along Liberia’s borders has also remained relatively calm.  There have been positive developments within the country, across the border with Côte d’Ivoire (I refer to last October’s meeting of chiefs and elders, and many others, attended by Presidents Johnson-Sirleaf and Ouattara), and the development of a regional security strategy for the Mano River Union.  These are warmly welcomed by Liberia’s partners.  I have spoken to you before about the challenges of mob violence, which has gotten worse, and also SGBV.  There is also the periodic violence related to concessions, and the UN believes the Government can do more to have consultations and information-sharing with all affected communities.  I also reported to the Council on demonstrations and strikes the country has experienced. (2)  Many challenges remain on the path to good governance and to reforms that will help this country have a more inclusive character.  It is the view of the UN that these reforms need to be pursued with greater urgency.  Let me say a few words about governance and reforms.I was pleased to report to the Security Council on efforts to secure greater public accountability, including the work of LACC, the Liberia Anti-Corruption Commission;  the work of LEITI, the Liberia Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative and measures taken with regard to irregularities, such as the suspension of forestry Private Use Permits. Liberia cannot afford to have its population believing that corruption allegations go uninvestigated, or that investigations are not followed by consequences. It’s particularly important that these positive developments are reflected in the natural resources sector, including consultations with affected communities.In terms of major reforms that are mentioned in UNMIL’s mandate – namely, supporting constitutional reform, decentralization and national reconciliation – progress is very slow, and several initiatives are almost entirely dependent on donor funding.  National Reconciliation:  while the Palava Hut programme was launched by EJS six months ago, there is no concrete progress in implementation.  This was just one of the recommendations of the TRC, as you know, and is contained in the National Reconciliation Roadmap, adopted in Gbarnga in December 2012 and launched last year in June.  The National Reconciliation Road Map so far has been almost exclusively funded by the international community, with the PBF disbursing $11.2 million over 2 years. There needs to be more operational capacity and stronger political will by GoL, including the disbursement of the allocated budgetary funding [[it is only US$500,000, but hasn’t been accessed yet]] if there is to be progress in the next few years. This is also true of constitutional review. The timeline adopted by the Constitution Review Committee was to complete civic education and public consultations by the end of March, and to validate proposed amendments to the constitution at a national conference this month.  After that, proposals would be presented to the President, still this month, before being considered by the Legislature, and then, after 12 months, a national referendum.  Time is becoming very tight if Liberians want to see changes to the 1986 constitution within the current timeframe.  The UN strongly encourages the legislature, the executive, and all Liberians to reflect together on reform possibilities.  This is a unique window of opportunity.(3)  Let me turn to the Security Sector:  in particular, the Police.  As you know, some important steps were agreed at a security sector reform retreat last September.  Including:  to professionalize the police by appointing senior officials from within the ranks, and increasing transparency in tenure and promotion systems.  The LNP and BIN have been working to become more effective institutions.  So it has been frustrating to see the facilities vacated by UNMIL in Foya standing empty for over a year, waiting to become a BIN training center; and to see a new LNP training centre in Harper, inaugurated last September still standing idle.  Over the past few months, the Government has made significant commitments to strengthening the security sector: – The Minister of Finance has been personally involved in trying to make it easier for funds related to UNMIL security transition to be disbursed to the police, the immigration service and other agencies.  I am not sure this has had measurable success yet and we look forward to good news.  The police training academy has over a thousand recruits waiting to start training and over 250 people ready to graduate. – Second, the President herself has committed to activating more training resources and better use of facilities for training.– And third, the President has committed to having a better balance in the 2014-15 national budget between investments in infrastructure, and investments in national security.UNMIL will continue to offer support and to work with the many partners contributing to this sector.(4)  The first Justice and Security Hub is operational and the court house will be inaugurated soon, currently scheduled for 28 April. Services are starting to be rolled out in Hubs 2 and 3 in Harper and Zwedru.  The Governement of Liberia will maintain the functioning of these hubs and these are recurring costs that will need to be budgeted for.  There are other important actions awaited in the justice sector, also for the public to have confidence that courts work, and work impartially. While the courts develop, it is important to work on Alternative Dispute Resolution mechanisms.  There are trained mediators and [others] in many counties to help people settle their disputes amicably.  I visited one of Liberia’s Land Coordination Centres recently, in Harper – there are six of these centres – and heard about long-standing disputes slowly being discussed and settled.  Also, this process is free.  The MoJ has begun nationwide consultations to develop a national ADR policy.(5) Finally, I reported that UNMIL’s drawdown has continued smoothly.  I expect to report to the Security Council on this in greater detail later this year.  Thank you very much and I think we will now open the floor to questions Mathew.Mathew Elavanathoduka (OIC-PIO): Thank you SRSG Karin Landgren. Now we can take some questions and please introduce yourself and your institution before asking questions thank you.Emmanuel Flahn (Microscope Newspaper): Good morning, my name is Emmanuel Flahn and I work for the Microscope Newspaper. I am concerned about the state of security in Liberia. In your report to the UN Security Council Madam SRSG, you said the security situation is stable. But on the hand people have said the security apparatus are doing nothing in the interest of the citizens. How you reconcile the two assertions made?Joseph Soko Konneh, Jr. (Voice FM 102.7): Good morning, my name is Joseph Soko Konneh, Jr. I am concerned about the challenges that you mentioned Madam SRSG relative to mob violence and sexual gender based violence. What is UNMIL doing about it to help curtail mob violence and SGBV in Liberia?Fabine Kwiah (Radio Veritas): Good morning Madam SRSG. My question focuses on the Justice and Security Hub that you have mentioned and you said the public needs to have confidence in the justice system. Is it that you are relating directly to Liberians who have been trained by UNMIL since its onset in the country because much has been pumped into the justice and security sector? So I think that needs to be further explained. Another one is that you mentioned about Liberia’s constitution saying that time is tight and that if Liberians want changes we need to go back to the 1986 constitution. Thank you.SRSG Landgren: Thanks very much for those questions. The first question is about the state of security. UNMIL works with the government to monitor what is happening around the country in terms of security, both in terms of incidence of violence, and I mentioned concessions, I mentioned demonstrations and issues like sexual and gender based violence, where we work to maintain statistics of cases that are reported. And on the one hand, when I say we welcome the news it is that since the last report to the Secretary General, security within the country is generally stable which is to say a lack of major outbreaks of violence. It is not to say that the situation is rosy in terms of these types of violence that I have mentioned. UNMIL is working particularly with different government ministries and also with communities which is very important around gender based violence and how to combat it within communities; and on mob violence, as you know recently there was a launch of a national campaign to stop mob violence. Now some Liberians call it mob justice, but we do not call it mob justice because that is not an acceptable form of justice where people are hunted down sometimes on the basis of rumors alone and hurt or killed by the communities. So as these things continue we are also working closely, and so as many other partners, with the security sector precisely to help build up their capacity and their presence around the country and confidence in them.I have visited the LNP and BIN all over the country and one of the challenges which UNMIL has raised many times is that you find a vast majority of the LNP in the capital. So there is still not a good spread of police covering the rest of the country. When I visit them in county capitals, I always find that they have inadequate logistics, their cars are mainly broken, they have difficulty getting fuel, they have no communications equipment, they don’t have stationeries and sometimes they don’t have furniture or uniforms and their numbers are usually far below the numbers that are officially suppose to have. And you hear about how little they earn and how difficult it is to be stationed out in some of these more remote locations. So we are advocating strongly for greater support LNP and to BIN. But for that to be effective, these security agencies also need well functioning internal systems. So UNMIL has been getting and sharing with them expertise in how do you manage budgets, how you manage people/human resources, how do you manager vehicles, how do you manager facilities so that they get maintained and do fall apart immediately? And these are some of the systems that need to be strengthened. Also other partners, I want to mention Ghana, has been supporting this by bringing groups of LNP officers for training at the Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration. So strengthening how these actors themselves manage the resources that they have is a big part in making them be more effective.SRSG Landgren: Regarding the Constitution, the 1986 Constitution is Liberia’s current Constitution. That is the Constitution that applies right now. But many Liberians have said that it is… have pointed out that it concentrates a lot of power, a lot of decision making in the hands of the Executive. Many Liberians also pointed out that the administration of this country is concentrated in Monrovia. In fact for some of the decentralization self-initiatives that have been discussed to be implemented including the Local Government Act, which is currently under review, there will need to be constitutional changes. So it’s really is a question right now for Liberians. Do you want to see these things changed? Because if you do than the constitution will need to be changed to make that possible. Why is it important right now? Well, right now Liberia has a president who has named this Constitutional Review Committee and is opened to the possibility of reforming the Constitution, reviewing the Constitution. For this to happen, many things have to come together – the president, the legislature, the public in the form of a referendum – get to agree or reject the proposals that are made. So it’s very important in this fairly limited time because these are complex processes. That there will be more of an open debate about do you want changes in your constitution? This is the chance if you do and what kind of changes do you want to see. So that is why we emphasized this moment as a real window of opportunity to make these changes if Liberians want to see them. Thank you.Mathew Elavanalthoduka: Some more questionsArthur Douglas (ELBC): Good morning, my name is Arthur Douglas and I report for the state radio, ELBC. My attention is drawn to your comment on the national reconciliation strategy. And you said there is not much done, no credible or tangible program in place for the implementation despite the president’s commitment to the process. What exactly do you mean? You also talked about corruption, calling for more robust approach to corruption. You cited the issue about the Private Used Permits with the Forestry Development Authority. I have understood from your presentation that the UN has been following the issue of corruption. But is the UN also considering or let me just say, what is your assessment of government’s own response to clamping down on corruption considering the president’s assertion on corruption? My final question has to do with your frustration about the idleness of some facilities you turned over to government. In Harper, I was there when donors turned over the police barrack. You also talked about the one in Foya. Have you engaged government to find out why are these facilities still idle? Thank you.Joseph Soko Konneh, Jr. (Voice FM 102.7): Again I am Joseph Soko Konneh Jr., Voice FM. You talked about the limited number of police officers in Liberia in the midst of UNMIL’s drawdown. How is the security system going to be like, especially UNMIL is leaving Liberia gradually and Liberia and  what do you think is going to be UNMIL’s next move in strengthening the security sector? And from my end finally, the issue about – despite it wasn’t mentioned – Ebola, it got some security implications. Liberians are saying government should close its border with Guinea and what is UNMIL doing about it? Thank you.SRSG Landgren: Thanks very much. You asked about the lack of progress around some reformed initiatives especially around reconciliation and I think what I said was no concrete progress since the last time UNMIL reported on this to the Council. What is happening is that –I’ll mentioned three things that are – have been set in motion. But in all of these three things, we see very slow progress. The first is the palava hut initiative. As I mentioned, this was launched last October in Zwedru. But it is not yet being rolled out. There are some studies being undertaken of how different communities in Liberia themselves manage palavas – palava hut type processes and we would indeed like to see that speedy up. It’s a very long time now since the Truth and Reconciliation Commission reported it will be five years I believe this year. And again it is in the hands of Liberians how long do you want to wait for some of these processes to get underway. But to the UN these appear to be important processes to continue the discussion about what happened in the past and how to make sure that this doesn’t befall this country again.SRSG  Landgren: A second initiative is the national symbols project. If you recalled in July 2012 the national orator of that year, Dr. Elwood Dunn spoke about Liberia’s national symbols and was asked to head a small process to review these symbols. This is not the first time in Liberia’s history that the symbols have been looked at. So, that is moving forward again and we are coming up to two years since that fantastic speech in July 2012. I don’t believe we have seen real progress or recommendations with regards to Liberia’s national symbols.The third initiative is Liberia’s history project and looking at writing a share history of Liberia to have all of Liberia’s people agreeing on one version of what happened and how this country developed. Now I know that there had been some plans put in place for the writing of that history, but my understanding is, that has been stalled right now for lack of funding. So that is the more complete background to the lack of concrete progress in the past six months.In terms of clamping down on corruption, there had been significant public commitments made to do this and I mentioned some positive examples. Now the country has a new head of LACC and the country will have a new head of LEITI, these are important institutions to support and audit reports of national institutions remain extremely important. And it is my view that there is interest in being transparent as possible, as public as possible about both investigations into allegations of corruption and the measures taken against people who are accused. So we strongly urged that this continue and strengthened.There was another mention of the idleness of the facilities in Foya and Harper as I mentioned the president has recently committed to fast-tracking training facilities and so we are hopeful that these institutions would not stand idle much longer and would be used in full to speed up the training of the BIN and the LNP.  Now, more need to be done clearly with the police. Many people have observed that outside the capital, almost the further away you go the harder it is to find police presence in the number that they are suppose to be and effectively equipped with the facility they need in order to work.UNMIL remains extremely engaged on it, the police need to lift their game, they are committed to doing so and what is important right now is that funding has been allocated in the current budget specifically for UNMIL transition in order words specifically to fill gaps created by UNMIL’s gradual draw down and that is in addition to the regular funding in the budget for the security sector. So the Ministry of Finance has made this commitment to make it easier for the security agencies to get access to those transition funds. And that is USD6 million dollars budget which include some money for hubs two and three as well. So we are waiting to see the results of whether the money in that pipe line is indeed flowing to the LNP in particular.Let me say few words about Ebola. And the first thing I want to say is that this action to combat the spread of Ebola in Liberia is being headed by the government by Ministry of Health and Social Welfare under Health Minister Dr. Walter Gwenigale. So I am not taking the place of Dr. Gwenigale when I share this information with you. The government has drawn a national response plan, they have launched a national task force and they are taking this epidemic very, very seriously. The latest news we have is that there has been a total of eight suspected or confirmed cases of Ebola infection reported in Liberia. But I want to emphasize suspected or confirmed, there is not confirmed cases it is suspected or confirmed that includes four deaths of the eight, two were confirmed Ebola infection, one of whom died in Lofa County, the other of whom as Dr. Gwenigale who has reported who has been isolated in Margibi County who travelled from Foya. There are two probable and two suspected cases located in Foya.Yesterday, UNMIL Chief Medical officer accompanied the World Health Organization Country Representative and the government’s chief medical officer on a visit to Foya to access prevention and containment measures that are being taken by the authorities and by partners. The WHO doctor has remained in Foya and is still in Foya to look at those measures and of course the international community is eager to give all possible support to the government of Liberia as it combats the spread of this epidemic. Thank you.Mathew Elavanathoduka OIC-PIO: Thank SRSG. Any more questions?Fabine Kwiah (Radio Veritas): Hello again. I have two questions on security. You always mentioned that the security situation is generally stable and calm along the borders. Nonetheless, a year ago, I remember vividly, there was this incidence down the 12th Street in Sinkor where UNMIL personnel from Uganda allegedly murdered a Liberian girl. The incident was reported in the newspapers and on the radio. Now, during a press conference in this same room sometimes last year, I remember Aleem Siddique was here and I asked him about the fate of the case. I wanted to know the outcome of the investigation.  It took him time to answer the question and promised the press that he would return with the investigation outcome. Since then nothing has been said about it.My next question is that you have mentioned that governance and reform are being challenged, and therefore the need for renewed efforts to address the challenges. You named some institutions like LACC and LEITI. How do you explain that?Haji Massaley (SKY FM): Good morning. Madam SRSG you mentioned that the security system is stable and calm. You also said that the country has witnessed mob violence and demonstrations as well as strikes under the period in review. How can you be more explicit in reconciling that statement?SRSG Landgren: Thank you very much. That is a very good question. I want to be absolutely cleared with this group what we mean when we say generally stable overall. I have reported to the Council on the types of incidents or the types of violence that continue to occur; and they continue to occur as you pointed out. There have been strikes and demonstrations as well as continuing mob violence and sexual-based violence. And, there is no one saying that there is no crime in Liberia. But, you also know that UNMIL is not going to stay until there is the day when there is no crime in Liberia. What we are mainly looking at are incidents of the types that could challenge the overall stability of the country. So, when we look at the past six months, that is why we say generally, stable. We are not saying no crime, no violence. Similarly, when we look at the border with Cote d’Ivoire we are saying there is no confirmed cross-border attacks during this period. When I look back to 2012 and the situation prevailing then, we had many suspected or confirmed cross-border attacks across that border. So, this is a real change, and of course the fact that countries in this region have gotten together and committed themselves to regional security mechanisms. It is immensely important when one considers Liberia’s history, how the problems begun, and how problems were instigated across this borders in the past, this is a fantastic state of affairs. These are commitments from all the countries in the Mano River Union. So, that is the context in which we saying that the overall security is generally stable and remains stable.In terms of more details about accountability, first of all, I will encourage you to speak directly to LEITI and to LACC and get them to tell you the different measures they have taken or planning to take. The head of LACC was confirmed in his new post and, I think, at his confirmation talked about measures he foresaw LACC taking and planning to take. In the case of LACC, they have worked on financial disclosures of officials and have made the information public. In the case of LEITI, there is a post-contract audit process they have been involved in and also they are looking at incomes from the extractive industries. So, these are very important initiatives and I want to encourage these institutions and their progress.On the specific case you have mentioned, we would like to come back to you. I would only have an update on that case. Thank you. Thank you all very much.Mathew Elavanathoduka OIC-PIO: Thank you and with this we have come to the end of this press conference. Thank you all for coming and thank you to all the UNMIL Radio listeners. Please note that there are copies of the 27th Progress Report of the Secretary-General to the UN Security Council available for your pick up. Also there is a leaflet on the Ebola-virus which describes the prevention methods and symptoms.   Thank you SRSG.SRSG Landgren: Thank you.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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WAEC May/June 2014 Results Record Another Mass Failure

first_imgThe WAEC May/June 2014 examination results have just been released, the Monrovia Head Office of the West African Examination Council has said.So too, the latest information reaching our Education Desk reveals that the WAEC has released its May/June 2014 West African Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE) results.Unfortunately, the results show that students failed Mathematics and English Language portions of the exams “massively”.Head of the WAEC National Office in Monrovia, Charles Eguridu, who announced the results on Monday at the WAEC office, said “a total of 529,425 candidates, representing 31.28% of those who took the exams, obtained credits in five (5) subjects and above, including English Language and Mathematics.”He noted that when compared to the 2012 and 2013 May/June WASSCE diets, there was marginal decline in the performance of candidates as 38.81 per cent was recorded in 2012 and 36.57 per cent in 2013.Mr. Eguridu told newsmen that the results of 145,795 candidates, representing 8.61%, are being withheld in connection with various types of examination malpractice.“The cases are being investigated and the findings will be presented in November to the Nigeria Examinations Committee (NEC).”John Y. Gayvolor of the Monrovia Head of Office,  when contacted by the Daily Observer yesterday, reserved comment until further notice. He did not elaborate.However, candidates are of the opinion that they will pass the WAEC component of the exam as compared to the WASSCE, “because the WASSCE was just a pilot project for in Liberia,” some the candidates claimed.The WAEC, a non-profit  organization headquartered in Accra, Ghana, was established in 1952 after the Governments of Ghana (then Gold Coast), Nigeria, Sierra Leone and The Gambia, enacted the West African Examinations Council Ordinances in 1951.Liberia, however, became the fifth member of the Council in 1974.The enactment of the Ordinances was based on the Jeffrey Report, which strongly supported the proposal for the setting up of a regional examining board to harmonize and standardize pre-university assessment procedures in the then British West Africa.The main objectives are to conduct examinations in the public interest; and to award certificates, provided that the certificates did not represent lower standards of attainment than equivalent certificates of examining authorities in the United Kingdom.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Coach Manning Urges Red Lions, BYC to Utilize Midfield Attacks

first_imgVeteran Old Timers soccer coach Boniface Manning has called on the technical teams of two of Liberia’s representatives in CAF tournaments to design effective midfield tactics to ensure success.Coach Manning, who holds a CAF License B Certificate, told the Daily Observer yesterday that effective use of a team’s midfield is a sure way of handling the match in effectively.“It depends on the score sheet,” Coach Manning said, “when you are in the lead, use the midfield to hold on to the ball and frustrate your opponent.”He said, “Since your opponent is trailing, you can deny him the ball and frustrate him and make his job more difficult.”He said many teams are defeated when they fail to understand the midfield concept and noted that with the achievement of Barrack Young Controllers, and the campaign of Red Lions, technical coaches should ensure an effective design.“Poor handling of the midfield brings enormous pressure to bear on the defense and this can cause an own goal,” he said.In a demonstration, Coach Manning said there are many ways a team can build its attacks.“You can build from the midfield but you have to make sure that you have tireless wingers who will draw in, when the four midfielders advance,” he said.He further explained that when players are fit, with abundant energy, providing support to team-mates becomes a matter of course.“Consider counter attacks,” Coach Manning said, “in a counter attack a team using the modern 4-4-2 formation, must have players with strong abundant skills.”“Such players must be able to singlehandedly take their opponents’ defense on, and be willing to release the ball when the goalkeeper is not expecting a shot,” Coach Manning said.He said the two teams representing Liberia must go in for the goals before their opponents settle to play their own game.He explained excitedly about a compact midfield to ease the pressure on the goalkeeper, and said that coaching knowledge and its application is essential for success on the field.He urged players of Red Lions and Barrack Young Controllers not to relent because “the whole soccer community is behind you in your determination to change Liberian soccer history.”Coach Manning played for the national soccer team in the 70s but was injured in a friendly match against Sierra Leones’ Leone Stars.Reports from that period said he was a darling on the ball, who did what he wanted with the ball which endeared him to many soccer fans. He coached the former sensational club, La Modelle International (along with Coach Frank Jericho Nagbe) and is presently coaching Veterans Oldtimers soccer team that is presently leading the LONA league table.He has helped to develop many Liberian soccer players into national prominence.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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MCSS Discloses More Student Enrollment in 2014

first_imgThe Superintendent of the Monrovia Consolidated School System (MCSS), Benjamin A. Jacobs, has disclosed an increase in student enrollment for academic year 2014-2015, despite the outbreak of the deadly virus disease in the country.Jacobs told journalists Wednesday at the Ministry of Information daily press briefing that enrollment at MCSS schools increased to over 25,111 students, compared to 22,000 the previous academic year.“This is because of the movement of people from the rural parts of the country to Monrovia in search of what I call quality education as well as higher studies. And we are doing everything possible to ensure that Ebola preventive measures are also observed at MCSS various schools,” Mr. Jacobs said.At the same time, Superintendent Jacobs disclosed the provision of libraries, science laboratories and other facilities at high schools to prepare students for national and international examinations.“While the N. V. Massaquoi School in West Point has registered 1,080 students, it remains closed following the looting of the facility, but renovation work is nearing completion and the school will open in May,” Jacobs said.He assured the general public that all topics prescribed by the curriculum through the Ministry of Education would be taught before the end of school year in December.The MCSS Superintendent, however, lamented the lack of water supply on MCSS campuses, describing it as a major challenge that often leads to the abrupt suspension of classes. Jacobs appealed to government, local and international partners to help remedy the situation to ensure maximum use of instructional time to prepare the future generation.Meanwhile, the MCSS Superintendent and family have lamented the loss of 10 employees to the Ebola Virus Disease, and consoled families of the deceased for the irreversible loss.The MCSS is a government-run institution with oversight responsibility for all public schools in Monrovia.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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RIA’s Rehab Funding Set

first_imgMinistry of Finance and Development Planning (MFDP) Minister Amara M. Konneh has signed on behalf of the Liberian Government, a US$20 million loan agreement with the Saudi Fund for Development. The loan is to assist with the rehabilitation of the Roberts International Airport (RIA) runway.According to the Communications Unit of MFDP, the signing comes following a series of prolonged discussions and negotiations.The ceremony took place on the sidelines of the annual IMF-World Bank Spring Meeting held in Washington DC.Minister Konneh, who commended the Saudis for accepting the Government’s appeal, assured the Vice Chairman and Managing Director of the Saudi Fund for Development, Yousef Al-Bassam, who signed on behalf of his organization, that all necessary modalities will be put in place as soon as possible for the smooth implementation of the project.Mr. Al-Bassam expressed his institution’s willingness and readiness to provide assistance to the Liberian government to improve or replace damage infrastructures at the RIA.According to a dispatch from Washington, the Saudi Fund is part of a pool fund of US$57 million for the rehabilitation works. Already, the Liberian Government has concluded arrangements with the European Investment Bank (EIB) and the Arab Bank for Economic Development to assist with bridging the funds.Prior to the signing, the MFDP had earlier signed similar agreements with the European Investment Bank to provide US$27 million and the Arab Bank for Economic Development (BADE) an additional US$10 million to complete the financing target.The Finance Ministry said the Liberian Government is expected to contribute US$3million to complete the required financing for the project.The dispatched further noted that the rehabilitation exercise will focus on upgrading the RIA runway and the total rehabilitation of Taxiways A and B as well as widening of the Taxiway fillets. Consistent with the concessional nature of this facility, the loan will be repaid within a 20 to 40-year period with an interest rate of two percent.In another development, Minister Konneh has formally requested for financing for the pavement of the Gbarnga-Mendikorma highway to the Saudi Fund and other Middle Eastern development lenders including the Kuwait Fund, Abu Dhabi Fund, the Arab Bank for Development in Africa, among others.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Healthpage Liberia Sends SOS to Imams, Others

first_imgThe Executive Director of Healthpage Liberia, a local NGO, is pleading with well-meaning Liberians, especially those of the Muslim community to help post the bill of 5-year-old Abbas Morris Sagno, whose father is a ‘staunch’ Muslim. According to Mrs. Charlestta N. Williams, founder and executive director of Healthpage Liberia, she had made an open appeal to the Imams and other well-meaning Liberians last December on a local radio talk show but the parents of the little boy are yet to receive any response for their son, whose hospital bill needs to be settled before they can leave the facility. She said the boy’s hospital bill stands at US$5,500 and anyone willing to help can reach the boy’s mother on this Ghanaian number 00233244125687.Ms. Williams told our Health Correspondent via social media that her donors had initially posted the bill of US$4,750 for the first known condition for little Abbas until it was realized that he needed to undergo a series of surgeries. Doctors at the Cardiothoracic Unit of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital Children’s Ward in Accra, Ghana, had initially performed Caustic Ingestion Colon Bypass Surgery on him. They later noticed that more surgeries were needed to be done on him in order to keep him alive as he had come up with multiple complications. She said after the rounds of the latest surgeries, his bill now stands at US$5,500, which needs to be paid.She thanked Kenya Airways Ghana for the kindness shown them; adding, “We arrived here on April 24, 2015 and he was admitted along with Kubah, Nancy and Jestina on July 23, 2015 and went into surgery on July 27, 2015, and has been here since, undergoing various surgeries with his mother by his side. His bill for Caustic Ingestion Colon Bypass Surgery was paid in full by my Donor, Healing The Children, FL-GA as always in the amount of US$4,750. His series of other surgeries has come to that amount. His ticket is only for Sunday or he will be stuck here also,” she told the Daily Observer, sadly. “When we boarded the flight to return the other kids to Liberia on August 24, 2015, I had no idea that he was going to pull through it all. He could not speak a word at all, Blood Transfusion was the order of the day and I returned and he was buzzing me. I am amazed and blessing God for this Miracle,” Ms. Williams says of little Abbas. Ms. Williams also extended thanks and appreciation to Dr. Josiah George of the Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL) for the special care and attention and kindness that got Abbas and his mother to Ghana. She also thanked one Dr. Ian Pabs, who cared for the 5-year-old all the years and little Abbas is returning home for more care until he can start to eat enough to have his tube removed. She said they need the money to be paid so she, Abbas, and his mother can return to Liberia. Mrs. Williams’ Healthpage has airlifted many Liberian children in need of specialized medical treatment to various countries in the world for the past 10 years.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Nimba Utd, BYC II Crowned Champions

first_imgNimba United was crowned “Football Champions” on Sunday when she defeated LISCR FC on penalties to win the 2014/2015 Championship after 120 minutes of action produced no goals.Nimba United, formerly Adorence FC – won the top league title for the first time in five years as they edged LISCR FC 3-2 on lottery shot following a goalless draw after extra time in the finals at the Antoinette Tubman Stadium in Monrovia.When the match tied 1-1, Nimba United’s goalkeeper Emmanuel Deanneh blocked a penalty attempt which psychologically scared LISCR players as they kicked two kicks away – causing their defeat.It took a total of nine kicks to settle the outcome on Sunday after Nimba United had missed their first two attempts.Victory for Nimba United also handed Coach Kollie Corvy, alias Coach Mission-the distinction of lifting his first championship title, unlike LISCR Coach Cooper Sarnor, who has never lifted the “Cup” at either at the County Meet or the national football league.LISCR played excellently but failed to display their winning tactics as Nimba United controlled most of the match. The Mountaineers’ skipper Titus Cooper was the star of the game, delivering a fine performance that had fans chanting his name throughout the 90 minutes.Referee Jerry Yekeh disallowed a goal from Nimba United in the 26th minute after claiming that striker Adetu fouled a LISCR defender before shooting the ball into the back of the net. The “Mountaineers” – as Nimba United is known – continued their dominance in the match. However, their lack of capitalization on goal chances saw them head into penalty kicks before becoming victorious.Nimba United’s triumph earned them the amount of L$1.2 million (US$13,636) as the cash price. They will represent Liberia in the 2016 Confederation of African Football Champions League.Fans of the un-favor champions described the “win” against LISCR FC as sweet victory, having struggled narrowly to top Group A with 19 points, putting Watanga FC behind with 18 points.Flattened LISCR FC was the favorite team; having topped Group B with 25 points.Sunday’s 4-3-3 plot was not only workable for Nimba United which caused the team satisfaction at the end of the encounter.Their scheme lineup included goalie Emmanuel Deanneh; defenders Edward Dean, Anthony Buogbor, Joseph Dennis and Kermue Kamara. Others were Wilton Ninneh, Sunnyboy Dolo and Barbue Kollie, Adetu Evanononye, Titus Cooper and Patrick Sengbeh.Earlier, in the first game, Mighty Dragons clinched the 2nd division champions on a 3-2 aggregate against ELWA United, in spite of their 2-1 defeat. In the first leg, Mighty Dragons whipped ELWA United 2-0.On Saturday, Barrolle escaped relegation with a 2-0 win over Joy Conquerors and BYC II was crowned champions of the Knockout (LFA Cup) after pinning Club Breweries, 2-1 in a lottery shot, after a goalless match.This is the second time for BYC II to win the knockout title. In the 2012/2013 league, the Blue Boys whipped Watanga FC 2-1 to clinch the title.In the 2013/2014 league season, BYC II grabbed the 2nd division championship.Already, Aries FC, Jubilee and Club Monrovia Breweries have been sent down (relegated) to the 2nd division; while Nimba FC, Sesay FC and Joy Conquerors have been sent back to the 3rd division.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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