Cricket News Kapil Dev finally opens about reported ‘rift’ between Virat Kohli and Rohit Sharma

first_img Kolkata: Skipper Virat Kohli and his deputy Rohit Sharma can have “differences off the field” but it should not matter as long as their on-field commitment is up to the mark, former skipper Kapil Dev said on Thursday. There are reports of an alleged rift between Kohli and Sharma post India’s World Cup semifinal exit though the Indian captain rubbished them ahead of the team’s departure to the United States on Monday.”There can be off the field differences but it depends how you play on the field. Everyone should look into that,” Kapil said”Off the field, the way of thinking can be different, approach can be different. But when you’re playing there’s only one aim — how we can win a match. That is important. Differences of opinion does not mean you will be pulling somebody down,” Kapil, whose hot and cold relationship with Sunil Gavaskar used to be headlined during the early and mid-80’s.He also took a dig at the media urging them to be more responsible while reporting.”You have to do your job, right. Thoda bahut toh aap bhi help karte ho naa rumour banane mein. (You people also do your bit in spreading rumours),” he said.Meanwhile, the legendary Kapil Dev, head of the three-member Cricket Advisory Committee (CAC) that will appoint the next head coach agreed with his colleague Shantha Rangaswamy that skipper Virat Kohli’s opinion “needs to be respected”. The World Cup winning former skipper however assured that his panel will do their job to the best of their ability. highlights Kapil Dev heads three member CAC committee.India to play full bilateral series against West Indies.Virat Kohli to lead India in all-three formats.center_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

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Branford notches 11 goals as Pepsi Hikers rack up huge victory

first_imgTUESDAY evening’s matches of the 2019 Noble House Goals Galore Indoor Hockey Championships presented the first showing of the mighty PEPSI Hikers, who amassed the highest total of goals for a single match with 21 to signal a real threat to their opposition. Apart from Hikers; GCC and Saints also had productive evenings in both male and female competitions being played at Cliff Anderson Sports Hall.The PEPSI Hikers, boasting a plethora of senior national players, seemed to be in cruise control as they crafted goal after goal against the junior YMCA OFHC Champs. With the Champs beginning on a 12-goal handicap, Hikers pulled within two by the half and then continued their dominance in the second half en route to a victory of 21 goals to 12.Prolific striker Aroydy Branford was the standout of the match in terms of goals as his total of 11 in a single game is unmatched for the tournament so far.A fit and fast YMCA OFHC Top Form indeed seemed to be in top form, as they took on the seasoned Hikers Generals. With Top Form beginning on a 5-goal handicap to the Generals’ 9, they first needed to make up a four-goal deficit to draw even. Top Form earned in just the second minute of play a penalty corner, which was converted with much aplomb by marksman Omar Hopkinson in what seemed like the beginning of a long and difficult match for the Generals. The seasoned Generals, however, led by former national Devin Munroe, stemmed the tide and held Top Form scoreless for the rest of the half.  The second half of play seemed a carbon copy of the first, as Hopkinson slammed home a second penalty corner goal two minutes after resumption but was unable to produce any further goals for the match. The final outcome saw Generals stroll off with a 9-7 victory.GCC Vintage chalked up their second win of the competition by defeating the YMCA OFHC Pacesetters by 15-13.  While Vintage enjoyed a five-goal handicap, they still needed six goals just to draw even with Pacesetters who had a handicap of eleven goals.Veterans Dwayne Scott and Alan Fernandes led the charge for Vintage who made up the deficit before the end of the first half and cruised to victory in the second.The ladies’ competition saw two close matches. The unbeaten GBTI GCC Spice with zero handicap faced Bingo Spartans with a five-goal handicap. From the opening whistle, the Tigers applied pressure on their junior opponents and Dacia Woodroffe’s opening penalty corner goal in the fifth minute signalled their intention to win.Skilful striker Gabriella Xavier added a second for Tigers four minutes later, moving the score to 2-5 still in favour of the defensive Spartans.  A surprise overlapping run, however, from left back Makeda Harding saw her pounce on a rebound and score against the run of play for the Spartans.  Macaela Harding, opponent and sister of Makeda, not to be outdone, nudged the GBTI ladies one step further with her field goal two minutes before lemon-time.The second half saw some good counterattacks from Spartans but Tigers dominated the scoresheet with three more goals – a Xavier double and a single from Woodroffe. The highly contested match between the two undefeated sides saw their unbeaten records remain intact as the final score read 6-6.The Saints ladies, with a five-goal handicap, took to the court for the first time in the other female matchup of the evening against the YMCA OFHC Bellatrix with a nine-goal handicap.  Captain and national striker Tekeisha Deleon led from the front for Saints scoring a helmet-trick (four goals) for her side while young speedster Chrlia Webb added a single.The five unanswered goals, the last of which came in the final minute, saw Saints edge the Bellatrix by 10-9.last_img read more

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Experience at Warner School prepares Hosoyamada for SU ice hockey

first_img Published on October 25, 2010 at 12:00 pm Contact Ryne: rjgery@syr.edu Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Mikko Makela remembers the first time he saw Akane Hosoyamada play hockey. The head coach of the Warner Hockey School noticed the diminutive girl’s skills and skating ability at a tryout for his team. He knew Hosoyamada — who is now a freshman defender for Syracuse — had the tools to become a Warner Warrior. The Warner School is a powerhouse that attracts elite talent and produces top college players. The hockey team has saved the small school in Alberta, Canada, from closing and the town from disappearing. There is a certain pride that comes with putting on the Warner sweater. Hosoyamada lived up to the proud tradition in her three years with the program. Makela, who played seven seasons in the NHL, only hopes to find more players like her to maintain the program’s success. ‘In this program here, we’re trying to find the players that have a good skill set and very good people,’ he said. ‘And then after that, we can build things around that, and that’s what Akane is: a completely perfect Warner girl, the type of a Warner girl and hockey player that we’re looking for.’ She has achieved her goal of playing Division I hockey. It was a goal that started with that tryout more than three years ago.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text It started with the Warner School. ‘They told me that they wanted me and how I could definitely play at Division I,’ Hosoyamada said. ‘That’s what got me thinking that I wanted to play at this level of hockey.’ Hosoyamada transferred from Banff Community High School to Warner to focus on hockey. She improved her game and lived away from home in a college-like atmosphere, an experience that prepared her for SU. By her second year with the team, Makela noticed the quiet girl started to break out from her shell. She was becoming a leader and was named a team captain. ‘Whenever Akane said something, everybody listened because she wasn’t talking just to be talking,’ the coach said. ‘Whenever Akane had something to say, it was something important and something meaningful.’ He said Hosoyamada was a no-nonsense type of player who led by example. She picked up that attitude from her coach. Makela constantly stressed the importance of one thing to his players: work ethic. It was the foundation of the Warner program. ‘He always focused on how, individually, we have to work hard in order for the team to succeed,’ Hosoyamada said. ‘He made me realize that work ethic is a big thing.’ That work ethic and attitude, along with her skating ability, caught SU head coach Paul Flanagan’s eye. Flanagan watched her play for Team Alberta at the National Women’s U-18 Championship against the top players in Canada, and he was sold. Her experience at Warner, coupled with her versatility, has Flanagan excited about her potential to make an immediate contribution. The head coach said she has good instincts and plays big on the ice. Hosoyamada played both ways in high school. She was voted the team’s best defender twice and was also an offensive threat on the wing. Flanagan plans to highlight that versatility this season. ‘We expect her to continue to grow with the team and develop into not only a solid defensive defenseman, but we think that she’ll be able to give us a little added punch up front because she likes to go with it and jump into the play,’ he said. Hosoyamada has played in all seven games for the Orange this season, logging key minutes on defense and picking her spots on offense. She recorded her first career point on an assist in SU’s 7-1 win over Connecticut. Makela said Hosoyamada worked hard to reach the Division I level. The journey began with that tryout, and it continues at SU. But she will always be a Warner girl. Though Makela didn’t play hockey at the collegiate level, he gave Hosoyamada some advice before she came to college. Said Makela: ‘Just be yourself and play hard like you have done in Warner, and it will take you places.’ rjgery@syr.edulast_img read more

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‘To My Players’: Full text of Marrone’s email to SU players

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Related Stories In email to Syracuse players, Marrone thanks team, says he will always support SU Published on January 8, 2013 at 4:01 pmcenter_img Here is the text of the email sent to Syracuse players on behalf of former head coach Doug Marrone Monday after he was introduced as the Buffalo Bills’ head coach:To My Players,I am very sorry that I haven’t had an opportunity to speak to you in person regarding my move to the Buffalo Bills. It happened very quickly when I was not in Syracuse, and when most of you were not in Syracuse. I will explain everything in depth when I meet with you in-person this weekend.For now, please know that accepting the job with the Bills was a very difficult decision for me. When I took this job four and a half years ago, I explained that being the Head Coach at Syracuse University had always been my dream job, and that was the truth. Attending Syracuse University changed my life, and from the time I left this campus in 1985, I dreamed about returning one day as the head football coach. I was finally given the opportunity, and it has been the most DIFFICULT and the most REWARDING professional experience of my life. I have learned so much from each of you. I do not have the words to express the satisfaction and the joy that coaching you has given me.You are my guys. You will always be my guys. Syracuse University will always be my school. I have never considered leaving Syracuse for another university. But the fact is, when the Buffalo Bills called and offered to make me their head coach, I said yes because I am excited by the challenge.I feel good about the progress the Syracuse Football Program has made under my leadership. I believe that I am leaving the program in much better condition than I found it. I will do everything in my power to ensure that your next head coach will continue on the path toward making Syracuse University a national football powerhouse. I will always support Syracuse University Football. I will always support each of you. If there is any way that I can help you with football and with your lives after football, reach out to me. Reach out to me even when you need nothing, I want to hear how my guys are doing.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThank you for fulfilling a dream that I’ve had since I was 22 years old. Thank you for the privilege of being your coach. My thoughts and my heart will be with you on every down of every game.Work hard every day. Never take a short-cut. Never quit.Love,Coach Marrone Commentslast_img read more

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Tumolo to undergo surgery for torn ACL, miss remainder of season

first_imgSyracuse attack Michelle Tumolo suffered a torn left ACL and requires surgery, SU Athletics announced Thursday.No timetable has been determined for the surgery, head coach Gary Gait said. Gait added that he has yet to look into appealing for a medical redshirt for Tumolo, but said he plans to.“As a coach, you feel bad for the athlete that goes down hurt, anytime that happens,” Gait said. “But I think as a coach, we all understand that you got to be ready for these situations. … We played all year to be prepared to be deep and have some players that can play if one did go down.“We’ll just move forward and hopefully the team will come tighter and kind of rally around Michelle and we’ll see.”The senior went down at the 18:38 mark in the first half of the No. 5 Orange’s 16-4 win over Cornell on Tuesday afternoon. Tumolo twisted her left knee as she hustled toward midfield on a ride, trying to prevent a Big Red clear.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textShe lay on the Carrier Dome turf for several minutes near the Syracuse sideline and needed assistance getting to her feet. Tumolo walked off under her own power, but was visibly emotional as she sat on the Syracuse bench.In Tumolo’s absence on Tuesday, freshman attack Kayla Treanor assumed the senior’s offensive role in playing behind the cage, a location Treanor said after the game she’s comfortable playing from.Tumolo’s experience and production will be difficult for the Orange to replace. She leads the Orange with 24 assists this season and is third with 22 goals. One of the most celebrated players in program history, Tumolo ranks No. 3 in SU history with 278 points. She is second on the all-time assists list with 137 and fifth in career goals with 141.“It’s real upsetting, you never want to see someone go down but it’s part of the game,” junior attack Alyssa Murray said. “It’s difficult to deal with but she wants us to keep playing because she would do anything to get back on the field, so just got to win it for her.” Comments Published on April 18, 2013 at 12:12 pm Contact Phil: pmdabbra@syr.edu | @PhilDAbb Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Syracuse runs out of steam against No. 6 Georgia Tech in 4-3 loss

first_img Published on March 26, 2017 at 5:41 pm Contact Andrew: aegraham@syr.edu | @A_E_Graham Facebook Twitter Google+ As the dark grey sweat stains on Anna Shkudun’s shirt grew, so did her third-set deficit. After 19 hard games against Georgia Tech’s power hitting Johnnise Renaud, Shkudun was visibly drained.Her breath dogged. The graduate student hustled back and forth down the baseline at Renaud’s whim, with barely enough energy to fire back her lofty, weak returns. As fatigue set in for Shkudun, Renaud saw her opening and made the third set the most decisive.“The other girl (Renaud) just stepped it up a notch and started being more aggressive,” SU head coach Younes Limam said.After splitting the first two sets with Renaud, 3-6, 6-4, Shkudun dropped the third set 6-0.The Orange started the morning down 2-0. Gabriela Knutson and Miranda Ramirez then both picked up singles win and knotted the score at two a piece. But Syracuse (5-8, 2-4 Atlantic Coast) couldn’t get over the hump and pull out a win over No. 6 Georgia Tech (17-2, 7-0) as Maria Tritou couldn’t force a third set and Shkudun’s faltered.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I thought that Anna and Maria both did a great job of fighting,” Ramirez said. “It just didn’t happen today.”After Kenya Jones put Tritou in a hole, winning the first set 6-4, the sophomore stepped up her play in the second set. Tritou came roaring out of the gate in the second stanza, asserting herself with a 4-1 lead.Chance after chance kept passing Tritou, and soon enough, Jones had clawed back and taken the lead 5-4, winning four straight games. Tritou responded once more, making it 5-5, but that was all she could do. Jones won the next two games, winning the No. 4 singles match, 6-4, 7-5.“Unfortunately,” Limam said, “the other girl (Jones) played the bigger points a little bit better.”Only two players — Dina Hegab and Shkudun — were left for SU, and both would need to win.Hegab held strong against Nadia Gizdova in No. 6 singles, but Renaud played antagonist to Shkudun. Early in the match, Shkudun fired a crosscourt volley that Renaud called out. Shkudun began arguing her case with the official, while Renaud could be heard saying, “Stop, stop, stop, stop it,” in Shkudun’s direction. The irritation didn’t cease for Shkudun.Still recovering from a November knee surgery and not fully in shape — according to Knutson and Limam — Shkudun struggled to traverse the baseline, and Renaud exploited this reality. Renaud would pound Shkudun with cross-court volleys before picking her spot to send a backhander down the opposite line. Other rallies, Renaud go forehand to backhand, making Shkudun change direction and chase every shot, wearing her down.By the third set, Shkudun was exhausted, and Renaud got aggressive. When Shkudun fired one of her high-arcing returns, Renaud would charge the net and place a shot past Shkudun.Frustration boiled over for Shkudun when she had a chance to capitalize on one of Renaud’s rare mistakes and buried her kill shot in the net. Shkudun stomped her way to the baseline, berating herself.“She just has to keep pushing and pushing,” Knutson said of Shkudun, “and she’ll be able to win all the matches she has left.”After Renaud quickly dispatched Shkudun in the third set, Hegab played on and won. But the victory was muted by the fact SU had already lost. With the match on the line, Syracuse didn’t have enough in the tank. Commentslast_img read more

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Injuries, fatigue have Syracuse’s frontcourt in a predicament after 74-70 loss to North Carolina State

first_imgDespite Matthew Moyer’s contributions Wednesday night, the state of the Syracuse frontcourt remains muddled.Moyer played more minutes (28) in SU’s 74-70 loss to North Carolina State than he has in any game in a month, scoring eight points and adding four rebounds, a steal, an assist and one turnover. Still, the frontcourt is in a predicament.With five games remaining on the schedule, Syracuse (17-9, 6-7 Atlantic Coast) minimized the likelihood it will go dancing in March, losing 74-70 to North Carolina State (17-9, 7-6) in the Carrier Dome. Wednesday’s loss stemmed from an inability to defend NCSU’s 3-point shooters. Why that is concerning moving forward lies at not the top of the 2-3 zone but at the bottom, Moyer said.NCSU generated open looks and knocked down 10-of-23 3-point attempts because Syracuse forwards, Moyer included, did not “bump” enough. In other words, they did not extend out to the corners, mostly.“Us fours need to do a better job getting up and bumping,” Moyer said. “Tomorrow in practice, me, Marek and Oshae will watch film and try to correct that.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse nearly blew a double-digit lead against Wake Forest on Sunday because of 3-point defensive struggles. The Wolfpack brought a similar formula to the Dome and it worked. The reason why SU forwards have not played strong defense of late is correlated to the injuries and inconsistency currently plaguing the unit and ultimately forcing SU to play a smaller lineup.After starting the first 20 games of the season, Moyer sustained a high-ankle sprain against Boston College on Jan. 24. He has not started since and missed two games altogether, Pittsburgh and Wake Forest. Freshman center Bourama Sidibe is battling left-knee tendinitis, and he has struggled in ACC play after a fairly promising start to the season. Junior center Paschal Chukwu has been up and down. SU head coach Jim Boeheim said he thinks Chukwu tweaked his back on Wednesday night.“Two guys are hurt,” Boeheim said. “Can’t play if you’re hurt. They tried. They tried to go, they just couldn’t move or jump. Couldn’t make plays.”That leaves Syracuse with just Dolezaj, who has started SU’s past six games, and Moyer at the four position. Brissett can play there, though he thrives best at the three. So, even if the Syracuse frontcourt gets back into the rotation an at-least-somewhat-healthy Moyer, the unit is lacking depth.Before tipoff Wednesday, Moyer jogged out on the court without a protective boot, which he wore Sunday as he watched the game from the bench. While it was clear Wednesday that he did not have full strength in his ankle, he logged productive minutes for SU. He practiced both Monday and Tuesday, and he finished with eight points and a handful of quality defensive plays.Over his previous three games off the bench, Moyer had played 34 minutes and scored just two points. After the Virginia loss on Feb. 3, Boeheim said that Moyer would not be back in the starting lineup anytime soon, given his lack of contribution to the SU offense.Wednesday he reversed that, his showing offering an idea of what he could add to Syracuse’s depleted frontcourt in the season’s final stretch. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on February 15, 2018 at 1:06 am Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21last_img read more

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No. 5 USC handed first loss in upset by No. 16 Washington State

first_imgNo. 5 USC entered Friday night’s contest against No. 16 Washington State in Pullman with a perfect record, national championship aspirations and a chance at proving it was the undeniable king of the Pac-12.It left with its first loss, its odds at the College Football Playoff shrunken considerably and its reign on the conference in question.In front of a raucous crowd of over 33,000 at Martin Stadium that poured onto the field after the final whistle, the Trojans struggled to find their game. Redshirt sophomore quarterback Sam Darnold, with a ravaged offensive line protecting him, was not his usual self, and a late fourth-quarter flash was not enough.In fact, it was a mistake by Darnold, with USC down a field goal in the final minutes that ended the game. He made a weak attempt to toss the football ahead to avoid a sack, but it wound up a fumble and a recovery by Washington State.On this night, it was Washington State’s time to shine. Tickets, even standing room only, were sold out for this game. Before kickoff, the public address announcer hyped up the crowd by boasting the game was being broadcast on national television.And on the big stage, it was Pullman’s Cougars who bested Hollywood’s Trojans, 30-27. It snapped USC’s 13-game win streak dating back to last season, its first loss in more than a calendar year.“We’ve got a bunch of hurt kids in that locker room right now,” head coach Clay Helton said. “It’s been a while since we’ve felt this, and it hurts.”Redshirt senior safety Chris Hawkins even became emotional.“I cried, honestly, in the locker room,” he said. “It hurt.”With time winding down in the fourth, the Cougars marched downfield thanks to a 35-yard run by running back Jamal Morrow. A 32-yard field goal by Erik Powell served as the eventual game-winner.Sam Darnold throws a pass against Washington State – Photo courtesy Ryan Pugh | Daily EvergreenIt came after Darnold, who had been struggling all night long, found a connection with redshirt freshman wide receiver Tyler Vaughns to tie the game. On 4th-and-13 at the 42-yard line, Darnold found the receiver in traffic for the conversion. And on the next play, he hit Vaughns against to set up first-and-goal. He finally punched in a two-yard touchdown run to even the score with five minutes left in regulation.But he didn’t have enough in the tank for another two-minute drill a la Texas, though everyone, including Darnold himself. expected him to pull another rabbit out of his hat.“I thought it was automatic points,” Hawkins said. “One of the best quarterbacks in the country. Whether it be 3 or 7 [points], I thought we were going to score regardless.”The Cougars pulled ahead in the fourth quarter on a masterful drive by  Falk, who converted several third downs and a fourth down and finally found Morrow on a shovel pass for a 23-yard score to put Washington State in front 27-20.Falk finished with 340 yards on 34-of-51 passing, outplaying Darnold, who was 15-of-29 for 164 yards. Washington State finished 8-of-18 on third downs, while USC only converted two of their 11 third-downs attempts.“It ends up costing us a lot of plays defensively,” Helton said.Falk was also effective in making adjustments.“There were times when we would change something and he would change something back,” junior linebacker Cameron Smith said. “Pretty smart guy.”The two teams traded field goals in the third quarter, with neither settling into an offensive flow. There were punts, penalties, reviews and stoppages as the game grinded to a halt and the teams entered the fourth quarter tied 20-20.In contrast, USC’s offense looked sharp to start the game, as Darnold marched the team down on a 10-play, 75-yard drive that ended in a touchdown. It was the Trojans’ most efficient drive of the half, and it ended with a four-yard touchdown run by Darnold after he had scampered for nine yards on the previous play to set up first-and-goal.But then the offense sputtered, and the injuries started piling up. The Trojans already came into the game banged up. USC was without redshirt senior wide receiver Steven Mitchell Jr. (groin) and redshirt junior guard Toa Lobendahn (staph infection) in addition to junior linebacker Porter Gustin (toe/bicep). Then, late in the first quarter, junior offensive tackle Chuma Edoga appeared to hurt his left leg and was replaced by freshman offensive tackle Andrew Vorhees. And senior offensive guard Viane Talamaivao appeared to hurt his shoulder early in the second quarter. USC was down to two healthy starting offensive lineman for the remainder of the game.Injuries, though, serve as nothing but a pity call.“Nobody’s going to have any sympathy for us,” Hawkins said. “We’re injured across the board. Nobody’s going to say anything about that.”Darnold added that it came down to simply performing.“We knew what they were going to do,” he said. “It was just a matter of executing at that point, and they out-executed us.”Ronald Jones II runs the ball during USC’s game against Washington State – Photo courtesy of Ryan Pugh | The Daily EvergreenThe offensive line issues didn’t help Darnold, who couldn’t find a rhythm and threw several questionable balls and one interception in the first half. He was bailed out only by an explosive 86-yard touchdown run by junior running back Ronald Jones II that put the Trojans ahead 14-10 in the second quarter. It was the longest touchdown run by a USC running back since 1996.Still, USC looked to have all the momentum when, on Washington State’s ensuing possession, Falk’s pass was tipped and intercepted by senior linebacker Uchenna Nwosu inside the five-yard line. But Darnold and Co. could not capitalize, settling instead for a field goal and a 17-10 advantage.It allowed the Cougars to hang around and tie the game at halftime. Falk had a strong first half, and the USC secondary allowed several big plays. Down 7-3 early in the second quarter, Falk dumped a screen pass off to wide receiver Tavares Martin Jr., who had nothing but clear space ahead of him for a 28-yard touchdown. And right before halftime, Falk led the Cougars on a 12-play, 94-yard drive that started from their own six-yard line and was aided by a few pass interference penalties by the Trojans. Morrow pounded it in from a yard out to tie the game at the half.The Trojans are sure to slip in the rankings, and will have to win out in order to get back into the playoff conversation. But for now, the focus shifts to next week and Oregon State at home“They’re probably not going to be happy to play us after this one,” Hawkins said.last_img read more

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Leinster quartet on the mend.

first_imgThere has been some good news on the injury front for Leinster, and potentially for Ireland today.Dave Kearney, Fergus McFadden, Shane Jennings and Jordi Murphy are all in contention to face Treviso in the Guinness Pro 12 this weekend.Meanwhile, Ben Te’o took a limited part in training this week, albeit with his fractured forearm in a cast.last_img

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House speaker: Jamaica deserves compensation for slavery

first_img“I encourage all Jamaicans not to dismiss the issue of reparations offhand but to try to understand the reasons behind the call and the implications it would have for our society,” he added.On behalf of Parliament, Charles commended the CARICOM Reparations Commission, and the Ministry of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, through the National Council onReparations (NCR), for staging the Reparations Youth Baton Relay and Rally.Building awareness among the youth The CARICOM initiative is aimed at building awareness among young people across the region about the issues surrounding the reparations movement and agenda.Relays have been held in Barbados, Guyana, Suriname, St. Lucia, and Antigua and Barbuda.The Jamaican leg of the relay commenced on October 10, and has covered the parishes of St. Thomas, Portland, St. Mary, St. Ann and St. Catherine. House Speaker Pearnel Charles The Speaker of the Jamaican House of Representatives, Pearnel Charles wants Britain to offer reparations to Jamaican for slavery. Reparation Speaker of the Jamaican House of Representatives, Pearnel Charles, says that compensation should be awarded for the many indignities heaped on the country’s ancestors during the period of slavery.Charles remarks came during the Reparations Youth Baton Relay and Rally at Gordon House earlier this week.The speaker of the lower house argued that the British Government felt that it was just to compensate the planters, who had already benefited from the exploitation of “our ‘foreparents’, by awarding them £20 million, the equivalent of more than £20 billion today”.Honor our ancestors“We cannot undo the injustices of slavery, but we can honor our ancestors by demanding that their contribution be properly recognized,” he noted.last_img read more

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