St Mary’s calls for pay to meet living expenses

first_imgNurses’pay would have to be tripled in order for them to afford housing for theirfamilies in central London, a leading HR professional in the NHS has claimed.DeborahO’Dea, HR director at St Mary’s Hospital in London, believes the 50 per cent turnoverrate for newly-qualified nurses within her trust is caused by accommodationproblems.Buyinga three-bedroom house in the area costs around £180,000 – beyond the means ofexperienced nurses earning £18,950 per year.O’Deasaid, “We found it costs £1,950 per calendar month to rent a one-bedroom flatin Paddington – more than a nurse’s monthly salary. Currently, 58 per cent ofher staff live in west or northwest London, with up to 900 needing hospitalaccommodation.Surveysof hospital staff by the HR department shows that staff most likely to staywith the hospital were over aged 40.Shebelieves that recruiting older, settled people who are likely to own their ownhouse is key to solving the recruitment and retention problems.Speakingat a School of Business and Industrial Management conference on affordablehousing in the NHS in London last week, she said, “I believe there is a directlink between the housing our staff live in and providing quality healthcare tothe people of west London.“Iwant nurses to be able to get on the accommodation ladder so they can achievethe ambition of a three-bedroom flat.” St Mary’s calls for pay to meet living expensesOn 20 Mar 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Identifying trends – specialised HR

first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Identifying trends – specialised HROn 4 Dec 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. HR is becoming more specialised and the outsourcing of some aspects of theHR function is increasingly common among organisations. Research in the latest edition of Analysis of Personnel Activities and Costs(APAC) highlights some serious trends that are having a growing impact on thewhole nature of HR in better performing organisations. First, there is a move to quality through increasing professionalism andspecialist provision of HR services. Second, associated with this trend,outsourcing of HR in whole or part has, whether rightly or wrongly, capturedthe imagination of successful boards of directors. The first trend identified can carry substantial benefits for the astuteboard. The APAC database includes an example from a 600-strong organisationthat two years ago employed one HR manager, two personnel/training officers andfour clerical/administrative support staff at a headline cost (in base salaryterms) of £160,000. Latest data indicates that at a cost of £120,000 there are now threespecialists; training, recruitment, remuneration and one administrator. Thisreduction in HR numbers has coincided with an almost 20 per cent surge inprofitability. Assessing the HR input requirements of the organisation is central todeciding the nature, balance and intensity of service that is appropriate. Linemanagers can always provide the necessary insight into what is needed tosupport the business most effectively. An HR service and effectiveness audit is central to discovering these needs.It should be noted that such an audit emphasises the need for professionalismand underpinning legal requirements. Outcomes vary from, “We can do all that is needed ourselves” and,”We don’t have time to do any of this and need high quality, accessible HRinput” to, “We have no faith in the effectiveness of our internal HRservices and would like to buy in the necessary support.” Clearly the statistics indicate that professionalism and quality – whetherinternally or externally provided – are winning through. Benchmarking studiesshow, however, that fewer than 50 per cent of organisations are activelymeasuring their performance and effectiveness in HR delivery. All the indications are that, with increasing frequency, under-performing HRfunctions are having change forced upon them. By Derek Burn, Partner, MCG Consulting Grouplast_img read more

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Letters

first_imgThis week’s lettersThought-provoking line manager piece I thought the cover story on your 13 May issue (on your exclusive researchamong HR professionals on what they thought of the line managers within theirorganisation) was just terrific. Quentin Reade’s article was well researched and put together, and I enjoyedreading it. I strongly suspect that such research in the US would turn up very similarresults. A powerful and thought-provoking read – congratulations! Lance Jensen Richards Managing director, Suddenly Global LLC, USA Concessions really there for the parents I couldn’t agree more with your article, ‘Pregnant Pause is ManagerialCurse’ (13 May). The Government seems to be forgetting two things: first, parenthood is achoice, made by people for their own reasons – and normally without consultingtheir colleagues beforehand; second, the tax system, favouring parents soheavily, decreases the goodwill of childless people towards their parentingcolleagues. Surely the Equal Pay Act was, among other things, meant to stop people beingpaid according to their family circumstances, rather than the value of theirwork? It does grate, then, when a middle manager’s subordinate with threechildren takes home more pay than her. Nor am I convinced how necessary it is to allow time off work to parents forthe child’s first day at nursery, nativity play or sports day, etc. I don’trecall my (single parent) father taking time off work for these things and Iseem to have survived. I can only conclude that these concessions are more forthe enjoyment of the parent than the needs of the child. All things considered, it’s remarkable that relations between the childlessand parents are as good as they are. Name and address supplied Morals and ethics good for business I think the ‘Blowing your own credibility’ article by Stephen Overell (Offmessage, 10 June), reflects some valid issues surrounding the increasingly popularuse of ‘business ethics’. However, it comes down on the cynical side, pulling too much on utilitarianismand the view that individuals have the ‘WIIFM’ (What’s In It For Me) tuneplaying in their head at all times. Reality lies far more in the middle ground.We know that individuals behave far more charitably when they have anaudience. Research shows that men give more to street collections and the likewhen they are in female company, as opposed to on their own or with other men.But surely one of the objectives of any business is to become sustainable, andpart of this must include businesses reputation. If we see a way to increase our reputation as being seen to do the rightthing, then as people, we are going to do so. However, just because this isdone in public, whether through engaging with business ethics or corporatesocial responsibility, does not mean that business isn’t also doing ‘the rightthing’ out of sight and the limelight. Doing good business (or ethical business) means running a successful andprofitable one. All businesses and organisations have to reflect the needs andwants of consumers. Today, consumers want transparency, and for businesses toshow that they are run honestly and with integrity. This means businesses willhave to deliver their wares with honesty and integrity to reach the greatestnumbers. In my opinion, this cannot be a bad thing. Whether the main driver isthe bottom line or morals, becomes academic. To me, the objective of promoting business ethics is so that we can improvethe society we live in. George Gallant Good Business Network Majority are against congestion charging I read your article entitled ‘Employees call for congestion charging acrossUK’ (News, 13 May). However, the figures could have been presented in anotherway: “More than two-thirds of workers think congestion charging would notimprove their journey to work…” How would you fancy paying a tenner a day (it won’t be £5 for much longer)for entering a city? The charge is having little effect on traffic now thatpeople are getting used to it. Road users have paid many times over for a decent transport system. It’s notan issue of having to pay more and more to use less and less road. It is anissue of governmental spin, and how funds are actually spent. Jane Samuel Independent IT systems consultant Childless workers are not victimised I think Ruth Gilmour, HR manager of Kingstown Furniture, should consider thebigger picture with regard to accommodating colleagues with dependants, be theykids or sick or elderly relatives (Letters, 27 May). Yes, of course children are the responsibility of the parents and yes, itdoes put pressure on colleagues when an individual has to put their familyabove their work. However, we are all part of society’s system, and there willbe times when we have to ‘take’ more than we can ‘give’. But to condemn thosewho are at such a stage in their lives is short -sighted. If we apply this victim mentality of the childless ‘carrying’ the world’sparents to pensions, Ms Gilmour would presumably object to staff paying intopension schemes which are given to those of pensionable age. Would she suggestthat we stop the practice of one part of society helping another in this way? Balancing work and family life is difficult, but that is only one piece ofthe big puzzle. If Ms Gilmour has found a miracle solution for all domesticcrises that she’d like to share with the rest of us, then that would befantastic! I find this whole debate over whether it’s harder being a parent or not verytiring. Life is many things but, unless you are completely detached fromreality, it is never a bed of roses all of the way. Just stop moaning please. Nancy Wright Title and company name withheld LettersOn 24 Jun 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Striking a balance

first_imgTocoincide with Work-Life Balance Week, we asked the training community what roleit could play in maintaining the equilibriumManaging work-life balance is one of today’s great challenges as anincreasingly frenetic workplace takes its toll on people’s health,relationships and well-being. According to the Work-Life Balance Trust, 80 percent of visits to doctors in the UK are stress related. This isn’t just badnews for individuals: it loses 7 million workdays for British industry each year,and the annual cost of absenteeism is a staggering £5bn. The trust’s annual Work-Life Balance Week (1-5 September) is designed toraise awareness of the issues and spur firms into action. We asked academicsemployers and trend-spotters to share their opinions with readers and to ensurethat the effects of the week last longer than five days. Claire McCartneyResearcher, Roffey ParkSome organisations take advantage of Work-Life Balance Week to runconferences or workshops, perhaps on flexible working or stress and timemanagement. Some include fun activities such as yoga or massage, to slow peopledown and attract their interest. Work-life balance is not just about hours and workload; it is about havingcontrol over what you do, and training can help people to achieve that control.Staff surveys are vital if you are to identify any hot spots and do somethingabout them. You also need to review current training. Is it working? What do peoplewant? Have any areas been overlooked? Make sure you don’t alienate staff bycatering for people with apparent special needs, such as parents, whileneglecting everyone else. Tracey CarrManaging director, Eve-olutionHow effective the trainers can be depends on the culture of theorganisation. In a recent survey we conducted with health management firmVielife, 72 per cent of respondents felt flexible working and job share optionsimpeded career advancement, so we still need a huge cultural shift. People are most productive when they feel happy and motivated, and are gettingsomething out of life at work as well as at home. We have the longest workinghours in Europe and the lowest productivity rate – could there be a link? Alison StrawHead of organisational development, SelfridgesOur philosophy is based on this premise: how many people on their deathbedwish they had spent longer in the office? We encourage managers to challengethe need for excessive hours. They are also expected to be role models ofbalance themselves, and to know their teams well enough to recognise when theyare overdoing things. Our responsibility in learning and development is to give managers theskills to create realistic performance targets, and to provide feedback whenbalance is not achieved. Some of our operational staff now work from home. They appreciate spendingless time in the van and the business benefits too. However, there arepractical implications, and our line manager training includes specificsessions to address them. How do you communicate with people you rarely see?How do you motivate them or evaluate their performances? They also need to beprepared mentally for losing the chance to socialise with colleagues or talkwith the boss. Annette AndrewsDiversity manager, Europe, Ford Motor CompanyOne of our engineering line managers was so concerned about high stresslevels among his employees, he created a workshop to help his managers tackleit. What is significant is that it was driven by the bottom line and based on theprinciple of empowering managers to be flexible and make decisions withoutrelying on HR policies and directives. They also commit to cascading theinformation to their staff through half-day programmes. The workshops have been so successful we designed a generic model, which weare currently rolling out across Europe. Ken BlanchardChairman, Ken Blanchard CompaniesTo achieve work-life balance, people must enter their day more slowly. Taketime for solitude, prayer, exercise – whatever helps them decide who they wantto be that day. One company I know doesn’t allow staff to make or receive calls between8-9am. They spend that hour planning their day and thinking ahead, which theyhave found really helpful. If you don’t carve out time for your reflective self, you get caught up inthe rat race. The trouble with that is even if you win, you are still a rat. Further informationWork-Life Balance Week: www.w-lb.org.uk/wlbweek.phpThe Evo-lution and vielife survey: www.eveolution.net/main/survey.asp,www.vielife.comRoffey Park’s new handbook: Work-Life Balance: A Guide for Organisations isavailable from: www.roffeypark.com/bookshop/researchreports.aspDuring Work-Life Balance Week, Roffey Park’s website (www.roffeypark.com) has a dedicated portalwith articles on the theme and information on what companies are doing. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Striking a balanceOn 1 Sep 2003 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Guru

first_imgThis week’s guruBig branding takes over DerbyshireOne Guru disciple, Andrew Powles, has uncovered a conspiracy which hasimplications for all of us. In an e-mail, Powles told Guru of a new book calledJennifer Government, which follows the premise that subsequent to the takeoverof everything by American-dominated corporations, everyone has to take on thesurname of their employer – hence marketing man Hack Nike, for example. A scary idea indeed. Imagine then Powles’ discomfort when he spotted anadvert for an HR officer at North East Derbyshire District Council, withapplication packs available from Martin Derbyshire. Guru recommends disciples change their surnames to their employer of choiceimmediately, thus pre-empting the corporate takeover and ensuring your place intheir organisation. On this note, please send all future correspondence to ‘GuruHawaiian-Tropic-Bikini-Team’. More sex please – we’re stressed The latest figures from the Health and Safety Executive reveal 13.5 millionworking days a year are lost through stress in Britain. Mud immediately getsslung at employers for this, but we must remember that problems at home canattribute to your own personal crisis. This brings us inexorably, as seems to happen rather too often with Guru, tothe issue of sex. There is nothing more stressful than the knowledge that thebirds have stopped getting it on with the bees in your undergrowth. According to a survey by the British Medical Journal, 22 per cent of men and40 per cent of women have been diagnosed with sexual problems. And, a secondstudy found 35 per cent of men and a staggering 54 per cent of women had atleast one sexual problem lasting at least a month. So when the grumbler at the computer next door says they are stressed, stoptheir whining by pointing out that HMV has a great deal on the Good Sex Guide.While Guru wants to help, he warns disciples not to lose sight of the bottomline. As with all business, sex is a race – there’s no prize for second place. Why did the blonde win compensation? Regular disciples might have noticed Guru’s penchant for getting peeved whenthe issue of compensation rears its ugly head. Nowadays, if someone looks atyou the wrong way there will be a no win/no fee chappy who will leap to yourlegal aid from behind the nearest bush. But just when you thought things couldn’t get any worse, the Bosnians havereally pushed the boat out. They are set to make blonde jokes illegal under newlaws that will enable women to sue people who make jokes about their haircolour. Not only does this raise the question of whether ‘ginger baiting’ will beOK, but cases brought under the gender equality law will surely be biased, asgentlemen (of the jury) prefer blondes. And what if collar and cuffs don’t match? Can you discriminate againstblonde from a bottle? Conversely, if a blonde dyes her hair brown, would it bealright to call it ‘artificial intelligence’, or would that amount to reversediscrimination? Textual harassment upsets the wives One woman you wouldn’t be rude to, whatever her hair colour, is fitnessinstructor Laura Church, who was fired from Gillingham Football Club aftertexting a congratulatory message to one of the players in the middle of thenight. Miss Church, a member of the British judo team for 10 years, is claiming shewas sexually discriminated against because the message would not have resultedin dismissal if a man had sent it. Apparently, the team chairman said the wives were getting jealous. Gurucan’t imagine a more volatile type of woman to upset than a footballer’s wifewho comes from Sittingbourne, Kent. In fact, Guru is surprised no-one has been murdered. Perhaps there is somekind of official process that needs to be undertaken before a person can belegally battered to death with fake Gucci handbags. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. GuruOn 2 Sep 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Absolutely fabulous

first_img Comments are closed. Absolutely fabulousOn 1 Oct 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Team-building has taken to the catwalk as fashion joins raft-building andwar games as a motivational exercise. Promising to help organisations overcome their employees’ self-limitingbeliefs while giving corporate training a makeover, former design directorCaroline Clayton and senior buyer for Knightsbridge stores Vivien Horrocks,have joined forces to form teambuilding company ‘2Divine motivators’. “Media companies and events companies have taken this up so far in thiscountry, but we want to work with people with flair who nobody knowsabout,” said Horrocks, who has recently completed an event with the TradeCouncil of Iceland. The corporate training days entail challenges of working against the clock.Guided by professionals from the fashion industry, each team has to create onemale and one female outfit inspired by designer themes before modelling theclothes on the catwalk. Styling tips, make-up and choreography are included. Despite offering “the thrill of the dressing up box”, Horrockssays that this is far from being a ‘girl thing’. “So far, 80 per cent of participants have been men,” she said. “We recently had a rugby player begging for help with making akaftan,” Horrocks added. E-mail [email protected] Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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GMB claims Tory victory would risk public services

first_img Previous Article Next Article GMB claims Tory victory would risk public servicesOn 9 Mar 2004 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Public services will be at risk if the Conservatives ever come into power,one of the UK’s major trade unions has warned. The GMB is so concerned about the possible ramifications of a Tory electionvictory that it has teamed up with other unions to demonstrate against theparty’s policies. Members of the GMB, the Trade and General Workers’ Union, Amicus and Unisonall participated in the protest at the Conservative Spring Forum in Harrogatelast Friday. GMB general secretary Kevin Curran said he wanted to speak out against theswingeing public sector cuts proposed by the Conservatives. “The public should not be fooled by the Tories’ shiny Saatchimakeover,” he said. “They are still the same old Conservatives,intent on cutting public services and leaving vulnerable communities at risk. “Make no mistake; public services would be at risk if the Tories evercame to power,” he said. “We estimate they will cut £18bn in publicservices from local government to defence if they were elected. “The Tories’ constant underfunding during the Thatcher years createdcommunities without hope,” he added. last_img read more

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Ellerton Training Services partners with Echelon Learning

first_img Comments are closed. Scottish Borders Council has subscribed to organisation development (OD) consultancy Echelon’s online management learning resource.Echelon’s popular ‘Learning Matters’ online learning library contains some 2,000 modules of development and performance support material that underpin quality of employee performance and continuing personal and professional development. The library contains a broad range of solutions, including:action lists that provide performance support on everyday issues self-development solutions to build new knowledge and skills personal performance diagnostics that assess individual and team performance in a range of key activities and behaviours business leader interviews that offer personal commentary from a range of leading entrepreneurs and corporate leaders book digests that introduce the work of some of the world’s leading management thinkersScottish Borders Regional Council employees will have 24/7 access to learning covering a wide range of subject areas, including leadership, communication, teamwork, finance, coaching and customer relationships. Scottish Borders Council asked Edinburgh-based training resource providers Ellerton Training Services to source the subject areas of greatest interest and priority. Ellerton Training Services was happy to recommend Echelon’s online library.  The Echelon solutions have the dual purpose of providing new knowledge and skills and acting as just-in-time reference tools to support accurate and productive working.Alistair Morrison, CEO of Echelon, commented: “We are delighted to welcome Scottish Borders Council as a new client. Our Learning Matters library provides a convenient and low-cost way of supporting employee development.”Judith Warren, managing director of Ellerton, added: “We are pleased to have been able to assist Scottish Borders Council in meeting thier development needs and to have collaborated with Echelon whom we have known and trusted for many years.”Karen Niven, Scottish Borders Council commented: “Scottish Borders Council recently acquired the use of the Echelon online library to support the Learning and Development needs of council employees for soft skills courses.”Echelon provides online learning and CPD solutions to a wide range of government, corporate, and not-for-profit organisations and professional institutes including the NHS, T-Mobile and the Royal Town Planning Institute. Related posts:No related photos. Ellerton Training Services partners with Echelon LearningOn 30 Mar 2009 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Comment on Why ‘agency recruitment’ is totally screwed by franz chong

first_imgComment on Why ‘agency recruitment’ is totally screwed by franz chongShared from missc on 31 Mar 2016 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Try being a thirty something trying to moving on from Pizza Driving given within 15 years the industry will practically be dead.I have been trying to do so for years but short of relying on backpacker boards for temporary jobs not a lot is out there.The rest of the positions you see in a Wednesday or Saturday paper are for people with highly sought after qualifications.Most places don’t have this discrimination rule on age but it sadly does exist.Maccas once you are over 21 DON’T WANT to know you in many cases,The Cab Industry with some exceptions very rarely has a Aussie,European of some Kind,Vietnamese or Chinese doing the driving these days and there are other examples I could use.Most Recruitment Agencies unless you know them through a family friend are useless.Don’t trust the ad’s you see on TV about certain organisations.Read full article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed.last_img read more

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Manhattan luxury market sees another strong week with 36 deals

first_img Email Address* Share via Shortlink Full Name* Message* A unit at The Benson was the most expensive deal in Manhattan last week. (The Benson) It may be too early to say New York’s luxury residential market is staging a comeback, but the uptick of homes that went into contract over the past few weeks continued post-Presidents’ Day.Last week saw 36 contracts signed for properties asking $4 million or more, just two fewer than the previous week, according to Olshan Realty’s latest market report. The majority of those deals — 26 — were for condos, with seven co-ops and three townhouses in the mix as well. The total sales volume was just under $266 million.Though deal volume is up, prices are still trending downward, with the average discount from the properties’ original asking price coming in at 16 percent.The most expensive deal was for a property that’s appeared at the top of this list before: A buyer signed a contract for a six-bedroom, 5.5-bathroom condo at Naftali Group’s The Benson at 1045 Madison Avenue. The unit, last asking $13.45 million, spans 4,196 square feet. According to Olshan, the buyers were a Tribeca family who sought out more space and better schools on the Upper East Side.Naftali’s ground-up Madison Avenue condo has seen a string of big-ticket deals in recent months, most recently in the week ending Feb. 8, when two floors went into contract.Two properties tied for the No. 2 slot last week: A three-bedroom condo at 10 Madison Square West in Nomad, and a townhouse at 40 East 67th Street, both of which were asking just under $13 million. Notably, the townhouse first hit the market in 2016 — but in this market and considering it apparently needs a renovation — that aspirational pricing didn’t fly. It finally went into contract a year after lowering the price to just barely under 13 million.Contact Amy Plittcenter_img Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink donna olshanLuxury Real EstateReal Estate Market ReportsResidential Real Estate Tagslast_img read more

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