Cut the calories, keep the taste

first_imgAnthony Alan (Barnsley, Yorkshire) has developed WeightWatchers muffins to provide a lower-fat, lower-calorie option for those looking for an Easter treat. Available in double chocolate chip, blueberry and lemon and sultana varieties, the muffins are packed in fours or individuals, with mini muffins available in 12- and triple-pack options.last_img

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Herma

first_imgThe new compact Herma 400 Slim Line label applicator allows new and existing rotary machines to be easily converted to run self-adhesive labels.The new 400 label applicator has been developed as a result of market influences and manufactured by HERMA (Haverhill, Suffolk), a specialist in self-adhesive technology.Such labels are being increasingly used thanks to fashionable “no-label looks”, quality metallic effects and non-standard functions.The Herma 400 Slim Line label applicator can reach a speed of 120m per minute, which relates to a throughput of around 60,000 labels per hour – assuming labels used are approximately 12cm in length.last_img

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Kluman & Balter

first_imgAccording to Kluman & Balter (Waltham Cross, Herts), healthy-eating practices, purportedly spelling the demise of the muffin, have actually contributed to an increase in demand, particularly for fruit varieties. The breakfast muffin, can be packed with sultanas, raisins, apricots or walnuts and flavoured with cinnamon and vanilla. A more exotic version could include dried tropical fruits, all of which are offeredlast_img

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Turning on the heat

first_img—-=== Timeline ===1857 Founded by Samuel Bowman for his three sons, two of which exited the company, leaving James Bowman owner1880 Chilled iron roller-mill invented1900 Bowmans build Station Mill, Hitchin1911 The company doubles storage capacity and enlarges its wheat-cleaning plant1916 The First World War deprives the Bowman family of two elder sons1939 World War II brings labour shortages and direct government1947 Station Mill converts to electric power, but is then blighted by fire1963 Bowmans develops its heat treatment system for flour1969 New development begins at Ickleford Mill1981 Station Mill closes1992 A new heat treatment plant opens at Whitley Bridge; Bowman Ingredients launches1994 Building on a production plant at Ickleford Mill begins and is completed in 19952008 Bowmans plans to launch “the next generation of heat treatment technology”, currently on trial bright futureMeanwhile, the future looks bright for independent millers, he believes. “I think it’s all to be gained for the independents and there could be a lot of changes ahead for publicly-owned companies; I suspect independent family firms will be in a good position to pick up business in due course. We were the first milling company to achieve the EFSIS Higher Standard, and service and quality have proved more and more important over the years.”With growing demand on cereal crops, the biggest challenge will be managing volatility in the grain market through longer-term contracting, he says. “We’re not subject to venture capitalist restrictions and diktats and we’re not publicly quoted, so we can take a longer-term view. We’re not averse to striking long-term deals and customers have benefited in this era of rising raw material costs. That way we all lock in prices at sensible levels and we’re not so vulnerable to the volatility.” n Family-owned miller Bowmans was established one year after the end of the Crimean War, the denouement of which saw a rush of grain returning on to world markets; the outcome was a dramatic fall in grain prices that sent the US into a three-year depression. Compare that to today’s dwindling grain stocks and soaring prices – not to mention the fact we’re battling overseas – and the contrast couldn’t be any starker.”Changes in grain markets are not new to us,” says an understated Guy Bowman, who has witnessed upheaval in the milling industry during his 42 years at Bowmans. The chief executive has just pulled the bunting down, following the firm’s three-day-long birthday celebrations. And while the stately age of 150 makes British Baker – at a budding 121 – look like a whipper-snapper, the firm is looking forwards, not back, with a new hush-hush heat treatment technology currently on trial.”We are well down the road on developing another generation of heat treatment, which is something we had as a world-first in 1963,” he says. “It’s the basis of our cake flour. Because it is clean label – and a lot of starches are not – it’s attractive to manufacturers; while maize-based starches have become very expensive, heat-treated wheat flour is a less costly alternative.”Using the technology, which limits amalyse enzyme activity to ensure consistent viscosity in flours and batters, the firm is expanding into foreign markets and launched a joint business venture three years ago in South Africa. “I wouldn’t rule out similar overseas ventures in the future,” says Bowman.The original milling business, still 100% family-owned, was supplemented in the early 1990s by the addition of Bowman Ingredients (BI), which manufactures a wide range of coatings, batters, glazes, marinades, dusting and flavour systems for fish, chicken and vegetables. In 1992, the milling division invested £2 million in a new flour heat-treatment plant in Yorkshire. These investments saw Bowmans’ product range diversify further into fast-growing sectors such as ready meals and soups and sauces, complementing the existing customer base of biscuit and bakery manufacturers.last_img read more

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Key Note research reveals rising sales at top bakers

first_imgThe average sales increase for the top 105 bakery companies was 18.9%, for the three years to December 7, 2006, according to a recently published report from Key Note.”The sales growth rate shows an upward trend,” said the report, “although the growth rate appeared to be slowing towards the end of the period.” Price rises started to hit hard in 2007.Pre-tax profits also increased, improving on average from £3.1 million in 2004 to £3.5m in 2006. In contrast, however, the pre-tax profit margin deteriorated from 8.1% in 2003/04 to 7.7% in 2005/06. Liquidity also deteriorated over the analysis period.Businesses analysed in the report include Greggs, Warburtons, Maple Leaf, Finsbury Food, Krispy Kreme UK, BakeMark UK and Patak’s.Out of the top 105 companies, each had an average of 842 employees, with pay increases of 11.5%, up from £13,255 in 2004 to £14,779 in 2006. Sales per employee improved from £50,000 in the first year of analysis to £55,000 in 2005/06.”Over the same period, capital employed per employee – the amount of funds available to assist each employee in their role – decreased from £23,000 in 2004 to £22,000 in 2006,” according to the Business Ratio Report.It added that the average return on capital, a measure of the profits generated against the level of capital invested in a company, increased from 17.4% in 2004 to 24.6% in 2005, before falling to stand at 19.3% in 2006.Commenting on the efficiency of the companies in question, the report noted: “In the third year of analysis the average company generated £1.67 in sales for every £1 of total assets held.”l For a full copy of the report email [email protected]last_img read more

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Don’t miss May cut-off for BIA entry forms

first_imgThis is the last chance to request an entry form to the Baking Industry Awards.All forms need to be back by the deadline, Friday 16 May. Former entrants who have not won beforehand, as well as first- time entrants, are particularly encouraged to enter.There are 11 different categories and the entry forms are simple to fill in.If you have high-quality products, run a solid business or have employees with good skills, send for an entry form now.Please note: you don’t need to be a customer of the sponsoring company, and independent judges make the final decision.The awards dinner will be held at London’s Grosvenor House hotel on Park Lane on 15 Sep-tember, and will be attended by key figures in the baking industry.Tel 01293 610433 or visit [http://www.bakeryawards.co.uk].See pages 22-23 now!last_img read more

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Report

first_imgNew research conducted by the Institute of Food Research (IFR), entitled Potential Prebiotic Properties of Almond Seeds, has found that finely ground almonds could have prebiotic properties, which can stimulate the growth of healthy bacteria.The study looked at the prebiotic effect of almond seeds in-vitro. Finely ground and de-fatted finely ground almonds were compared to commercial oligosaccharides (a recognized prebiotic). A colonic model was then used to mimic gut fermentation order to establish the possible prebiotic effects.”Almonds are known to have several nutritional benefits,” explained research scientist Dr Guisy Mandalari. “We found that finely ground almonds significantly increased the level of prebiotics – bifidobacteria and Eubacteria rectale – compared to commercial oligosaccharides. However, the de-fatted finely ground almonds did not have this effect.”Research concluded from the results that almonds – and specifically the fat in almonds – appear to exert a prebiotic effect. Dariela Roffe-Rackind, associate director European region for the Almond Board of California said: “Dr Mandalari’s breakthrough research supplements almonds’ extensive nutrition portfolio and provides further evidence that almonds are a natural ingredient that can tap into the trend for high functionality.”last_img read more

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Jobs saved at Riverside

first_imgMiddlesbrough-based Riverside Bakery has been rescued by a local businessman after the company went into administration in October. All 35 jobs at the bakery have been saved, after administrators Baker Tilly sold the business, which will now trade as Tees Valley Bakery Limited.According to Baker Tilly, the new owner, who wants to remain anonymous, has plans to develop the business, which is based in the Riverside Industrial Park.”Riverside has in recent years invested in modern production facilities,” said bakery manager Chris Timney. “The new owner is very enthusiastic and has some exciting plans.”last_img

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Chevler feeds football fever

first_imgUK baking cases manufacturer Chevler has launched a new range of football-themed baking cases in convenient pack sizes. The move is designed to help craft bakers and small cake makers take full advantage of UK and World Cup-related spending, expected in May, June and July.Chevler MD Stuart Whelan said: “Football fever will sweep the country shortly and by making our new range of soccer-themed baking cases available in packs of just 360, we are helping craft bakers and small producers take advantage of the opportunities the tournament will offer.”Volume sales of cupcakes were up nearly 14% last year, accor-ding to recent figures. And with the popularity of the national game as high as ever, Whelan says the new cases will also have year-round appeal particularly for occasions such as boys’ birthdays.A sponsor of National Cupcake Week, to be held in September, Chevler now makes over one billion baking cases a year.www.chevler.co.uklast_img read more

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News story: Professor Dame Sally Davies to step down as Chief Medical Officer

first_img leading the UK government’s response to health emergencies – this includes Ebola in West Africa from 2013 to 2015, Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 2018, Zika, Wave 3 of the flu pandemic in 2010, and the Novichok attack in 2018 health guidance – Dame Sally updated the UK Chief Medical Officers’ low-risk alcohol guidelines, physical activity guidelines and produced advice for parents on social media and screen use. At the request of the Home Secretary, Dame Sally reviewed the evidence on cannabis and her report paved the way for the introduction of the controlled use of medicinal cannabis An external recruitment process will launch shortly.Dame Sally’s key achievements include: Sir Chris Wormald, Permanent Secretary at the Department of Health and Social Care, said: work on antimicrobial resistance – after successfully raising the international profile of AMR, Dame Sally continued to campaign on AMR, resulting in a United Nations Resolution in 2016. She subsequently became a co-convenor of the United Nations Interagency Group on AMR and helped establish the £265m Fleming Fund to develop laboratories and surveillance for AMR across the world I want to pay tribute to the outstanding clinicians, scientists and public servants who have supported me in this role – men and women who are working tirelessly to improve the health of the nation. It has been an honour to be the first female Chief Medical Officer. I have enjoyed it from the start, and I will continue to do so right up until I finish. I am delighted to be appointed as Master of Trinity College following a distinguished list of predecessors and as the first woman. I can assure everyone that I will continue contributing to the global fight against AMR from my new role. Cabinet Secretary Sir Mark Sedwill said: Sally Davies has been a dedicated public servant and a driving force for improving the health of the nation. She has led the fight against antibiotic resistance and public health risks, and has pioneered world-leading action across a whole range of areas. She’s been not just England’s CMO but led thinking around the world. Sally has been an inspiration to us all and I’m sure has a huge amount still to contribute in the future.center_img Sally Davies has made an exceptional contribution to public service as the first female Chief Medical Officer guiding us through many public health challenges. Her historic contribution to tackling the global challenge of antimicrobial resistance will earn her the gratitude of people across the world for generations to come. I wish her well in her new role at Trinity College. They are lucky to have her. Professor Dame Sally Davies will leave her post as Chief Medical Officer for England and Chief Medical Advisor to the UK government later this year to take up a new role.After 9 years as Chief Medical Officer, Professor Dame Sally Davies DBE FRS FMedSci has now been appointed by the Queen as Master of Trinity College, Cambridge.Appointed in 2010, Dame Sally was the first female Chief Medical Officer. She worked in the NHS as a consultant haematologist for 30 years and was the first UK medical practitioner to specialise in sickle cell disease, before joining the Civil Service in 2004.Dame Sally became Director General of Research and Development for the NHS, created the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), and later played a central role in the establishment of Genomics England.She is best known for successfully paving the way for international and domestic efforts in the fight against antimicrobial resistance, and leading the UK government’s response to health emergencies including Ebola, pandemic flu, and the Novichok attacks. Dame Sally will step down as Chief Medical Officer at the end of September and will move into her new position in October 2019.Professor Dame Sally Davies said: World Health Organization (WHO) work – Dame Sally chaired the External Reference Group for the WHO’s first Research Strategy. This support was recognised by the WHO, as she was appointed to the WHO Kobe Centre Science Advisory Board in 2014. She chaired and led the WHO AMR Strategic Technical Advisory Group (STAG) for 4 years, at the request of the then director-general of the WHO Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said: Dame Sally is a true global leader on health. Whether advising on anti-microbial resistance, Ebola, pandemic flu, the Novichok poisonings, or how to keep our nation healthy, she has consistently and expertly demonstrated her world-renowned intelligence, experience, and commitment to the cause. I am delighted that Dame Sally will now be taking up such a prestigious position and I cannot thank her enough for the outstanding contribution she has made during her tenure as Chief Medical Officer. establishing the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) – in 2006, Dame Sally established and ran the NIHR, successfully putting in place programs to effectively spend over £1 billion annually and make the UK a world leader in clinical research once againlast_img read more

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