What you should know about Sam Warburton

first_imgLeading the way: Sam Warburton first captained Wales against the Barbarians in JuneBy Sarah Mockford, Rugby World Features EditorSAM WARBURTON recently said to me that he was content being a quiet member of the Wales squad, that he wasn’t quite ready to be shouting orders at the more senior members around him.In a couple of months things have changed dramatically for the openside flanker as he’s had to take on more vocal responsibility as Wales captain for their last three matches. And with Matthew Rees now a serious injury doubt for the World Cup, he could be fulfilling that leadership role in New Zealand too.While Wales will struggle to find an adequate replacement for Rees in the middle of the front row, they have someone more than capable of taking on the captaincy mantle, as he proved by winning Man of the Match in the 19-9 win over England in Cardiff.Warren Gatland said of his captain’s performance: “Sam was absolutely outstanding. That defensive effort at the breakdown stopped England getting momentum.”So what do we know about the Welsh back-rower? Here are five reasons why Warburton’s proving such a hit…1. Learning from the master Warburton has learnt his trade at Cardiff Blues under the tutelage on one of the greatest opensides of the professional era, Martyn Williams. While he may end up denying his mentor a 100th Wales cap, Warburton himself has mastered the same snaffling skills at the breakdown and provides his team with plenty of turnover ball.2. Gym won’t fix it Running man: Warburton scores against Italy3. Multi-taskerAs well as his scavenging abilities at the contact area, Warburton is also a solid tackler, a decent lineout option and offers himself as a powerful ball-carrier too, as his try against Italy showed.4. Leading from the frontWhile he admits to being hugely nervous before a Test in which he is captain, he seems to thrive on those nerves. He was undoubtedly one of Wales best players during this year’s Six Nations and has improved yet further during the last three games. He’s been to the fore of Wales’ game plan and hasn’t been found wanting in terms of his decision making. As a youngster, Warburton used to spend a lot of time in the gym trying to get bigger and stronger – but he might well have been doing himself more damage. Since he’s cut down on the gym work he’s also cut down on the number of injuries he’s picked up. It may be coincidence, but it seems the less strain he puts on his body in the gym, the more rewards he’s reaping on the pitch. 5. Rounded individualWhile he’s not someone to let his hair down out on the town – he prefers a protein shake to a few beers – he keeps himself occupied off the pitch. He plays the drums, likes walking the family’s dogs and is even looking into property development. He certainly knows how to switch off to rugby. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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England 12-6 Wales Talking Points from Twickenham

first_imgThe key talking points from England’s 12-6 win over Wales at Twickenham in the 2018 Six Nations Wales coach Warren Gatland wasn’t happy with the decision either, saying afterwards: “It looked like a clear try to me. They flew a guy in from New Zealand to be TMO and unfortunately I think he made a terrible mistake. At this level that is pretty disappointing.“I struggled a little bit with the wording. He said England got there first and there was no clear downward pressure from Wales. I thought Gareth got there first and there was clear downward pressure. In front of 82,000 people with a lot at stake, you need to get those decisions right.”Watch the footage of the Watson-Anscombe chase here to see what you think…Related: How the TMO in rugby worksThat Sam Underhill tackleSam Underhill arrived at half-time to replace Sam Simmonds but it was in the 62nd minute that he made his most crucial intervention.Wales broke down the wing and Scott Williams looked to be in for a try that would have cut England’s 12-3 lead. As he dived towards the line, Underhill flew in to drag his legs across the touchline before he had a chance to ground the ball.Watch the Sam Underhill tackle on Scott Williams here:If Williams had scored then, it could have been a very different game. Fast show: Jonny May scores the first of his tries against Wales. Photo: Getty Images England – Tries: May 2. Con: Farrell.Wales – Pens: Patchell, Anscombe. England 12-6 Wales Talking PointsEngland made it two wins from two as they triumphed against Wales to keep their bid to become the first team to win three successive Six Nations titles on course.Two Jonny May tries in the first quarter got the Twickenham crowd excited, but this was not the try-fest witnessed in the win over Italy in Rome last weekend – the wet weather didn’t help on that front.After Rhys Patchell had slotted a penalty for Wales in the 24th minute there wasn’t a point scored until the 76th minute, when Gareth Anscombe kicked another penalty to give Wales a losing bonus point.In fact, this is the lowest-scoring England v Wales game since 1988, when Wales won 11-3 at Twickenham.It may not have been a thriller, but there is still plenty to reflect on. Here are the key talking points from the game at Twickenham…The Ford-Farrell kicking axisEngland’s 10-12 combination of George Ford and Owen Farrell has long been hailed and against Wales the duo’s kicking games really came to the fore.Mixing it up: Owen Farrell opts for a grubber kick at Twickenham. Photo: Getty ImagesWhen Anthony Watson beat Rhys Patchell to a high ball to tap it back, it was Farrell who was quick to put boot to ball and the pace of Jonny May saw the England wing reach it first to touch down.A few minutes later, Ford put a kick ahead that Farrell chased and made several metres towards the Wales’ 22. Later there was another chip out wide to May.Boot boy: George Ford puts in a kick against Wales. Photo: Getty ImagesOverall, the England pair kicked smarter and more accurately than Wales – and that ability to mix their kicks allowed them to set up attacking positions and put pressure on the visitors. It also made Wales’ line speed in defence less of a factor.The bottle of Rhys PatchellWe had to mention Wales fly-half Rhys Patchell after Eddie Jones had openly questioned his bottle in the lead-up to this match.Backing himself: Rhys Patchell looks to break past Jonathan Joseph. Photo: Getty ImagesNeither he nor Gareth Anscombe were as reliable under the high ball as Leigh Halfpenny surely would have been if he hadn’t had to pull out before kick-off.Yet Patchell definitely showed bottle when backing himself to beat Owen Farrell and Anthony Watson with his sidestep when running out of his own 22 on two occasions in the first half.The work-rate of Joe LaunchburyMaro Itoje may be the more well-known of the England locks but Joe Launchbury was the standout at Twickenham.Defensive line: Joe Launchbury makes a tackle on Cory Hill. Photo: Getty ImagesHe was ever-present at the contact area, put in thumping hits and delivered a sweet pass back inside to set up Jonny May’s second try while being tackled by two players.Mike Brown was also brilliantly assertive under the high ball – not an easy task in the wet conditions – and was duly named Man of the Match. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION OFFERSMuch-debated TMO callIn the 22nd minute Rhys Patchell put in a cross-field kick to Steff Evans. The ball then ricocheted off Evans’s knee, which led to a chase between Anthony Watson and Gareth Anscombe to touch the ball down first.The decision went to the TMO. It was an extremely tight call and Glenn Newman ruled that the ball hadn’t been clearly grounded by Anscombe first. It caused much debate on social media and these two Wales internationals didn’t seem to agree with the call given their Twitter posts…last_img read more

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Germany to face Samoa in Rugby World Cup qualifier

first_imgMartyn Thomas reports on the turmoil surrounding German rugby as the national team prepare for a World Cup qualifier against Samoa Clear vision: Germany coach Pablo Lemoine is urging his team to focus on the task at hand (Getty Images)It was against this backdrop that the players prepared for Saturday’s match against Portugal, and it was perhaps unsurprising that despite a bright start Germany appeared weighed down by the pressure of the occasion as they fell 13-3 behind. Everyone knew their hopes of finding a new backer depended on victory.“Before we started training ten days ago, we talked with Kobus (Potgieter) about putting the political problems on the side,” Lemoine said. “I come from a union (Uruguay) that eight years ago was in the same position as German rugby is at the moment.“I believe the only way to get out of that situation is through working hard on rugby, really hard on rugby. Trying to put the people together behind one objective.“World Rugby supports us, German rugby supports us but the only thing we can do – the coaches and the players – is work. Work inside the field and try to show everyone we’re working in one way.”It is understood that World Rugby will cover the cost of Germany’s travel to Samoa for the first leg of their play-off on 30 June, but the DRV will have to bear the cost of hosting the Pacific Islanders two weeks later.Not everyone at the union was confident on Saturday night that those funds could be found but the importance of the tie means Germany will fulfil it whatever the long-term impact on the DRV.On target: Raynor Parkinson’s late penalty was key to Germany’s win (Getty Images)“We will start training Monday, train two or three days, have one day off then take the plane,” Lemoine insisted.There were those in Heidelberg who were disappointed by the nature of Germany’s victory on Saturday, adamant that a team from a division below should have been dispatched far easier.But from those inside the camp there was only an admission that a big step forward had been taken. The majority of the players and coaches who will lead the team into their clash with Samoa have had their livelihoods taken from them, while the union has lost its primary source of funding. Germany to face Samoa in Rugby World Cup qualifier The future of rugby union in Germany remains an uncertain one, but the national team at least put a turbulent week to one side as they maintained their unlikely hopes of qualifying for the 2019 Rugby World Cup.Germany’s prize for a nerve-shredding 16-13 victory over Portugal – the hosts having trailed by ten points early in the second half – is a two-legged play-off against Samoa for a place in Pool A of the quadrennial tournament in Japan.It would represent a sizeable shock were the European side to beat the 16th best team in the world over 160 minutes, but they are allowing themselves to dream.“(We have) 100% chance, to win,” Germany head coach Pablo Lemoine said following the match in Heidelberg. “If not, we don’t go. We stay here.” For many of the 2,300 fans who flocked to the Fritz-Grunebaum-Sportpark on Saturday, though, defeating the Portuguese was cause enough to celebrate.Victory ensured the hosts earned a modicum of retribution for the loss they suffered against Russia, secured via two tries in the final ten minutes, at this stage of World Cup qualification four years ago. Yet the race for Japan 2019 can seem a trivial one when set against the troubles German rugby is currently facing.The German federation (DRV) had put on a united front ahead of the Portugal match, recalling 14 of the players, as well as the coaches, who had made themselves unavailable for this year’s Rugby Europe Championship due to the stand-off between the union and Dr Hans-Peter Wild.Dr Wild has ploughed millions of euro into rugby in Germany via his WILD Academy, but revealed in an interview last week that he would withdraw his funding for that project, the club Heidelberger RK and the DRV to concentrate on Stade Francais, the French club he bought last summer.Rumours of the Capri-Sun owner’s intentions had reached those employed by the academy by last Monday. Two days later, the players and coaches were called into a meeting where their worst fears were confirmed – Wild will pay them until the end of the year, but then they will be without a job. All together now: Germany play the first of their two games against Samoa on 30 June (Getty Images) center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Samoa Not that the dark cloud hanging over the sport in the country will be allowed to distract the squad from the task at hand. “Control the controllables,” Potgieter, the architect of Germany’s rugby renaissance, said. “If we can’t control it, we can’t do anything about it, so forget about it.”Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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Being ‘written off’ helps England in the Six Nations

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Being ‘written off’ helps England in the Six NationsSome of the talk in the build-up had been about how it was time the established powerhouse was overtaken. Sure they had world-renowned names and a bloody good track record in this competition, but many were backing the other side. As always happens at this time of year, there was a thick serving of jokes, memes and even mocking advertisements pre-match.Then at the weekend the team in white physically dominated. By the time they reeled in an interception in the closing stages – a diving grab that eventually led to a score – it was the final nail in the coffin. It was them against the world and they had triumphed.But hold on… Is this England’s rugby team or the New England Patriots we’re talking about here? After all, the rugby side were not favourites to win on their Six Nations visit to Dublin on Saturday. The NFL side, well, they were led by a 41-year-old quarterback and the ‘dynasty’ there was meant to be crumbling, right?Related: The exchange of ideas between rugby and the NFLEngland have six Six Nations titles, with their last in 2017. They’ve had two Grand Slams in the Six Nations – their last in 2016. They have not had a Wooden Spoon in the championship since 1987.The Patriots have now won six Super Bowls with coach Bill Belichick and QB Tom Brady in harness. They’ve been to nine together. They have made the play-offs for the last ten seasons.Moment of triumph: Tom Brady celebrates his sixth Super Bowl win (Getty Images)Yet the way things worked out, these two outfits went into the weekend believing they were unfancied. And it totally suited both groups.When you are a hugely successful, storied franchise or national side, it can be tough to get yourself written off. Every diss, imagined or real, has to be blown up and stretched out. The media and fans at large – often referred to as ‘people’ or ‘they’ – can become the straw man detractors. Eddie Jones loves his side to feel like the enemy is at the gates and their ranks include the rest of the planet.Let the siege begin.Related: Six Nations 2019 table In 2018 Jones told the world that his defending champions from England were being slaughtered. “If you read the papers, then we might as well not turn up,” he said on the eve of the tournament. In 2017, after a world record-equalling run of 18 wins in a row, Jones said next opponents Ireland were “in a very favourable position psychologically”. When he arrived in 2016, England were a “work in progress”. Remember him saying England had no world-class players before revising along the way?Then, before the Dublin match-up this season, Jones said of Ireland: “Everyone is writing them up and they have got to carry that expectation round. We’re excited about playing there. Praise can make you weak.”That both played up the us-against-them nature of being with England, and implied that Ireland are fallible. While in 2017 and 2018, Jones’s team lost to Ireland, this time they were demonstrating how strong they were… while still claiming “everyone” thought they were rubbish.Then they outmuscled Ireland on the way to a 32-20 win.There were echoes in New England. Tom Brady said during the post-season leading up to this Super Bowl: “Everyone thinks we suck and we can’t win any game.” After the confetti finished falling in Atlanta on Sunday, they have equalled the record for the most Super Bowl wins in history.How do these teams believe that they are written off by “everyone”? Well, there is a difference between some outsiders wanting you to lose and the public at large actually thinking you are terrible. But it helps to blur this distinction or at the very least create the impression that you are being relentlessly hunted and the world is cheering for the poacher. Anyway, when you’re embedded in your own camp, where the message is tightly controlled, it doesn’t matter what the people outside genuinely believe. It is about narrative.Related: Six Nations talking points from Round OneWhat is clear is that neither England nor New England suck. Now Jones and his men in white will have a tough task convincing themselves that people think they are garbage and are destined to lose in the next round of the Six Nations.Thankfully there are other ways to create a siege mentality. So it’s great that, while France struggle on the field, there is a rich history of animosity between the nations on either side of the Channel to do a caricature of. Let’s get the buzz going again. Who’s with us – or more fittingly, against us?Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Powerhouses England rugby and the NFL’s New England Patriots thrive when feeling it’s them versus the worldlast_img read more

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2019 Rugby World Cup: Wales 43-14 Georgia

first_img TAGS: Georgia They withstood the Welsh attacks for nearly half an hour – and exerted pressure of their own – before Tomos Williams won the race to touch down a George North kick ahead.Georgia deserved another try, though, and duly delivered when taking a quick tap from a scrum penalty. The forwards carried hard and fast to get within a few metres of the line, then Levan Chilachava got low to cross the whitewash.Tomos Williams then turned creator for North, breaking on the outside before passing inside for the winger to stretch for the line.A maximum five points for Wales ahead of Sunday’s match with Australia, but that second half will have taken its toll in terms of the physicality.Star manDan Biggar led the attack well while being on the receiving end of some powerful tackles while Josh Adams was a constant threat, whether out on the wing or cutting into midfield. We’ll give the gong to Justin Tipuric, though. He was the action man for Wales on both sides of the ball. He took his try well, charged down kicks, made his tackles and proved, as ever, a good link man.Perfect timing: Justin Tipuric charges down Tedo Abzhandadze (Getty Images)Related: Rugby World Cup TV CoverageThe ReactionWales captain Alun Wyn Jones: “We came out of the blocks as we wanted in the first half. We’re probably a bit disappointed with the second half, we left a couple of tries out there. The overall feeling is we took our foot off the gas a bit in the second half. It’s a good result, but there’s plenty to work on.”Fab fourth: Liam Williams scores Wales’ fourth try against Georgia (Getty Images)Georgia coach Milton Haig: “The first half wasn’t very good. We got caught out a couple of times around the edge of our set-piece, so they ended up getting a few points.“But I thought we played very well in the second half and we showed typical Georgian fighting spirit we’re known for. I’m proud of how they went in that second half and it’s something to build on for the future in the tournament.”The TeamsWales: Liam Williams (Leigh Halfpenny 61); George North, Jonathan Davies, Hadleigh Parkes, Josh Adams; Dan Biggar (Rhys Patchell 67), Gareth Davies (Tomos Williams 51); Wyn Jones (Nicky Smith 56), Ken Owens (Elliot Dee 56), Tom Francis (Dillon Lewis 47), Jake Ball (Aaron Shingler 62), Alun Wyn Jones (captain), Aaron Wainwright (Ross Moriarty 51), Justin Tipuric, Josh Navidi.Tries: J Davies 3, Tipuric 13, Adams 19, L Williams 40, T Williams 65, North 76. Cons: Biggar 4, Halfpenny. Pen: Biggar.Georgia: Soso Matiashvili; Miriani Modebadze, David Kacharava, Tamaz Mchedlidze, Giorgi Kveseladze; Tedo Abzhandadze, Vasil Lobzhanidze (Gela Aprasidze 60); Mikheil Nariashvili (captain, Guram Gogichashvili 47), Shalva Mamukashvili (Jaba Bregvadze 47), Beka Gigashvili (Levan Chilachava 47, Gigashvili 79), Giorgi Nemsadze, Konstantine Mikautadze (Shalva Sutiashvili 51), Giorgi Tkhilaishvili (Shalva Mamukashvili 55-58, Beka Saginadze 58), Mamuka Gorgodze (Otari Giorgadze 60), Beka Gorgadze.Tries: Mamukashvili 43, Chilachava 69. Cons: Abzhandadze 2.Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Then, after Georgia had spent a good ten minutes in the Welsh 22 but not been able to break down the famed defence, Wales came again. From a lineout they spread the ball wide, Jonathan Davies cut a hard line and then passed outside for Liam Williams to collect it on the bounce and touch down. Four tries in 40 minutes and the bonus point secured.Georgia were more resolute at the start of the second period, though, and this seemed to rally a crowd that had been somewhat subdued in the first 40. They clearly wanted to see more of a contest.The Lelos set up a five-metre lineout from a couple of penalties, got their rolling maul in gear and Shalva Mamukashvili touched the ball down.On the board: Georgia hooker Shalva Mamukashvili scored at the start of the second half (Getty Images)Wales were straight back into the Georgian 22 and got their own maul moving – so much so that Jaba Bregvadze was sin-binned for collapsing it – but the Lelos were able to hold out the red waves and eventually turned the ball over. Opening scorer: Jonathan Davies finds space against Georgia (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img The Welsh kicked off their Rugby World Cup campaign with a bonus-point win against Georgia in Toyota 2019 Rugby World Cup: Wales 43-14 GeorgiaHead-to-headPlayed – 2Wales wins – 2Georgia wins – 0Did You Know?Alun Wyn Jones equalled Gethin Jenkins’s Wales caps record in this match. They have now both played 129 Tests for their country.Georgia maintained their record of not missing a conversion in World Cup history, getting maximum points from all 16 of their tries to date.Related: Rugby World Cup FixturesEye in the sky: An aerial view of Wales on the attack (Getty Images)In a nutshellWales had the try bonus point wrapped up by half-time in their tricky Pool D opener against Georgia – cutting through Georgia’s defence like the proverbial hot knife through butter – but they found it much harder work in the second 40 against a revived Lelos team.First to cross, after just three minutes, was Jonathan Davies, who cut straight through the Georgian midfield to score under the posts. The only surprise was that Dan Biggar then hit the post with his conversion – maybe the accidental headbutt from Liam Williams during the try celebrations played a part in that!Justin Tipuric and Josh Adams both notched tries in the first quarter, inside balls catching Georgia’s defence off guard and allowing the Welsh to make easy ground.You can watch the Josh Adams try here… Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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Free Six Nations wallchart with Rugby World’s new issue

first_img TAGS: Highlight Free Six Nations wallchart with Rugby World’s new issueThe 2020 Six Nations is upon us and the latest issue of Rugby World magazine has all you need to celebrate the championship.As well as a free Six Nations wallchart featuring all the men’s and women’s fixtures, the bumper 132-page issue features exclusive interviews with big-name players, predictions on who will win and strong opinion on rugby’s major issues.Here are 15 reasons to pick up a copy of the March 2020 issue of Rugby World magazine…Free Six Nations wallchartKeep track of all the fixtures with our double-sided wallchart. It features details of the games in the men’s and women’s championships, including TV information, and you can fill in results as the tournaments progressesWho will win the Six Nations? Post-World Cup, there is plenty of change amongst the championship’s teams. Stuart Barnes runs the rule over all the contenders before making his predictionsEngland fly-half George FordThe playmaker has reached new heights in the English realm, but – as he tells RW’s Alan Pearey – he’s not stopping thereGame prep: George Ford at England’s pre-Six Nations camp in Albufeira, Portugal (Getty Images)France wing Damian PenaudHe may be laid-back and quiet off the pitch, but he knows how to make an impact when he crosses the whitewash. We find out more about himStephen Jones on the new coaching teams“The Six Nations is under new management and that is exciting.” Our columnist gives his verdict on the back-room shake-upsIreland full-back Jordan LarmourThe Leinster man is a player who can get spectators on their feet in excitement. Get to know Ireland’s entertainerJump to it: Jordan Larmour on the attack against Samoa at the World Cup (Getty Images)Italy’s back rowWhy the loose forwards are so crucial to the Azzurri’s championship ambitionsUniversity rugby in South Africa LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Keep track of all the championship fixtures – and enjoy exclusive features in the bumper 132-page magazinecenter_img A dozen of the Springboks’ World Cup-winning squad came through the Varsity Cup or Shield. Can South Africa’s university game show us the stars of the future?Wales coach Wayne Pivac“I’m not one for a team of robots.” The new head man gives us an insight into his philosophy. Can he deliver the attacking style many Welsh fans are yearning forLead roles: Wales captain Alun Wyn Jones with new coach Wayne Pivac (Getty Images)Mark Evans on club finances“Clubs spending the CVC money on salaries hasten their own demise.” The CEO of Global Rapid Rugby assesses how Premiership and Pro14 clubs should use the influx of money from CVCBehind the scenes at London IrishRW’s Alan Dymock is allowed a glimpse of life with the Exiles as he spends the day at the club ahead of the second half of the seasonWorld Cup winner Katy Daley-McleanFrom Rio to Rotorua, the England fly-half reflects on the highs and lows of more than a decade at the top of the gameOn target: Katy Daley-Mclean is one of the best kickers in the women’s game (Getty Images)Super Rugby previewThis is the last year of Super Rugby in its current format but who will lift the trophy? We have the lowdown on all the teams, including players to watchSpotlights on Tom Curry and Dillon LewisResetting post-World Cup, the England flanker and the Wales prop look at what is next on their agendasThe making of Jonny GrayThe Scotland lock always tops the tackle charts, but where does his work ethic come from? Tom English spoke to those who know him best to assess his rise up rugby’s ranks and look at what’s to comeTop of the charts: Jonny Gray is known for his incredible tackle statistics (Getty Images)Plus, there’s all this… Rising stars Louis Rees-Zammit and Connor BoyleIreland Women’s full-back Eimear Considine on cracking codesDefining Six Nations triesDowntime with Italy’s Jayden HaywardSam Warburton’s tips on managing the refereeSean Holley analyses Scotland’s attacking creativitySam Harrison on leaving rugby in his primeInside the mind of Wales Women’s lock Gwen CrabbHenry Purdy on his rugby journey across hemispheresShould Scotland have a third pro team? A debatePaul Grayson on the box kickClub Hero: Northampton’s Taqele NaiyaravoroCharity Williams on swapping gymnastics for sevensGrass-roots club newsThe March 2020 issue of Rugby World magazine is on sale until 2 March 2020.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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Rugby fans in England could be back in stadiums from 17 May

first_img Fans could be celebrating in stadiums in England from mid-May (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Lions are currently considering several options, including the tour going ahead behind closed doors in South Africa and moving it to Australia. But the possibility of playing games in front of fans in the UK could make a home ‘tour’ more attractive to organisers, although there is obviously no guarantee supporters would be allowed in stadiums.It will all depend on infection rates and the number of vaccines being rolled out – and the Lions will have to make a decision without knowing what the picture will look like in a few months’ time.Still, the fact we now have dates to work towards for the return of community rugby and supporters is a positive. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Government plans to move out of lockdown also include return of community rugby at end of March Rugby fans in England could be back in stadiums from 17 MayThe Government’s plans to move England out of lockdown could see rugby fans return to stadiums from 17 May.The ‘roadmap’ announced by Prime Minister Boris Johnson also includes the resumption of organised outdoor sports – like community rugby – from 29 March.These dates are all subject to certain conditions being met around vaccines and infection rates, but are a positive sign for both professional and grass-roots sport.Related: A tribute to rugby fansIn terms of the return of supporters, the Government plans to run pilot events in April and if they are successful up to 10,000 people could be allowed into the largest venues from mid-May. In smaller stadiums, 25% of the total seated capacity could be permitted – it’s whatever figure is lower.So while there won’t be crowds for either the men’s or women’s Six Nations matches in England, fans could be back for the final rounds of the Gallagher Premiership season.If the move out of lockdown goes smoothly, all restrictions on social contact could be lifted from 21 June, which would mean capacity crowds from that point on. So there could be a full house at Twickenham for the Premiership final.Last year’s Premiership final was played in an empty Twickenham (Getty Images)As for the return of community rugby in England, there are likely to be restrictions around this in terms of contact training and so on, as there were during the previous ‘restart’ last year.The RFU cancelled all league rugby below Premiership, Championship and Premier 15s level last year, but there could be an opportunity for friendly fixtures under the ‘Ready 4 Rugby’ format.A statement from the RFU read: “The Rugby Football Union welcomes the announcement by the Prime Minster that grass-roots team sports, including community rugby, can return from 29 March and the start of fans returning to stadiums from May.“This is good news for the game and for players, coaches and volunteers across the country who will once again be able to enjoy the physical and mental health benefits of being involved in team sport. England coach Eddie Jones runs a Ready4Rugby session (Getty Images)“We will work with DCMS on the Covid protocols for the community game, including the format of rugby that will be permitted in return to play.  We also look forward to working with Government and other sports on the safe return of fans to stadiums.”Elsewhere in the UK, there are currently no dates for a return of community rugby or fans in stadiums. In Northern Ireland, lockdown has been extended to 1 April while in Wales, only four people from two different households can meet outdoors to exercise. News on Scotland’s route out of lockdown is expected later this week.The announcement that capacity crowds could be back by late June may also increase the likelihood of the British & Irish Lions series against South Africa being staged in the UK.A match against Japan at BT Murrayfield on 26 June is already on the schedule so could the rest of the tour be moved north?last_img read more

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Who is Zander Fagerson: Ten things you should know about the Scotland prop

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 6. His younger brother Matt is also a fully capped international. Born in 1998, the younger Fagerson was only 19 when he appeared against the USA alongside Zander.7. One nickname he holds is ‘Zandbags’ because he reportedly loves getting engaged in afters!MORE ON ZANDER FAGERSON Who is Zander Fagerson: Ten things you should know about the Scotland propThe Scottish scrum has become one of the steadiest units in the Six Nations. A large part of that is thanks to tighthead Zander Fagerson, who has formed a brilliant combination with Edinburgh loosehead Rory Sutherland. Both were picked in the British & Irish Lions 2021 squad to tour South Africa.But what else is there to find out about the Glasgow colossus?Ten things you need to know about Zander Fagerson1. Zander Fagerson was born on 19 January 1996 in Perth, a city in central Scotland known as the ‘Gateway to the Highlands’. His middle name is Ragnar, while his actual first name is Alexander.2. He was a Scottish youth mountain bike champion, winning a national competition in 2010 at the age of 15. He was also a member of the National Boys Choir.Watch him mountain biking below!3. Fagerson won a scholarship to Strathallan School for Sixth Form. International team-mate Jamie Ritchie was in the same year at school.4. A Pro12 debut for Glasgow came against Benetton Treviso in October 2014. He has now made more than 100 appearances for the club by the age of 25. 5. Scotland first selected the tighthead at the age of 20, making him the fourth youngest international prop in Scottish history, and the youngest since Bill Black was chosen in 1948. He came off the bench against England in the 2016 Six Nations. Glasgow and Scotland prop Zander Fagerson British & Irish Lions Squad 2021 Glasgow and Scotland prop Zander Fagerson Collapse Zander Fagerson’s try against Italy is EVEN MORE EPIC with the music from Titanic pic.twitter.com/Rgj5PNyeEG— Graham Love (@glove931) November 16, 202010. Married to Yasmine, the couple have a daughter named Iona, born in May 2019, and a son named Hamish, born in April 2020. The Scotland prop scores as Gregor Townsend’s side… Zander Fagerson scores bizarre try as Scotland beat Italy 8. You might notice some writing on his wrist tape – it’ll be his grandfather’s initials and a Bible verse.9. He scored a bizarre (and rare) try in the Autumn Nations Cup against Italy when an unusual bounce allowed him to walk over the line. Zander Fagerson scores bizarre try as Scotland beat Italy Zander Fagerson ahead of Scotland’s game against Italy in the 2021 Six Nations (SNS Group/Getty Images) Expand Expand Find out who Warren Gatland has selected for… Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Glasgow and Scotland prop Zander Fagerson talks embarrassing… British & Irish Lions Squad 2021 Look underneath the scrumcap to discover choir practices, mountain-biking and an unusual nicknamelast_img read more

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In Connecticut, Barbara Campbell named first ‘Diocesan Poet’

first_imgIn Connecticut, Barbara Campbell named first ‘Diocesan Poet’ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI When you listened, who gave you the best information on what was going on? Where are you as you see God working out God’s mission? What made you say, “I have to be involved”? Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 What are the joys, apprehensions, realities of being sent to lead God’s mission? An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Robert Fisher says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA What did you have to learn or perhaps unlearn as you lead? Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET May 22, 2012 at 2:24 pm In the immortal words of one of the world’s most influential philosophers:http://youtu.be/I71cY9Ysy5U Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (2) I welcome signed poems from all ages, in any language accompanied by an English translation. Please email questions you may have about the invitation, and your poems to:  [email protected]_____________More about Barbara Campbell:Dr. Barbara Campbell has been writing poetry ever since she got her first computer more than 30 years ago.  Her poetic heroes are Billy Collins, Mary Oliver, Martin Espada and Emily Dickinson.  As an English teacher, she encouraged her students at New Britain High School and the University of Connecticut to write poetry.  She served as a Teacher Consultant with the Connecticut Writing Project, Storrs.  She was honored to have poems published by Bard College, the University of Connecticut, and Seabury-Western Theological Seminary.  Her poem, “Literalism – as hard to get rid of as bittersweet and poison ivy” was granted a Polly Bond Award of Excellence for Episcopal Communicators in 2008.She is a member of the Vestry of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, New Britain, Senior Warden Emerita, Liturgical Assistant, Prayer Shawl Knitter, instigator of the Poetry Corner, and member of the Higher Education Committee of the Diocese of Connecticut.  In February 2012 she read GOEs at Kanuga. .Last year she inaugurated a “Poetry Sunday” at St. Mark’s. Local poets read their work during the adult forum and she worked with the parish rector, the Rev. Pat Hames, to have poetry woven into the liturgy of the main worship service. (This year, scheduled for Ma 20, 2012.)Barbara holds two degrees from the University of Connecticut, one from Central Connecticut State University and is a member of the Class of 1964 of Seabury-Western Theological Seminary, the second class to include women.Now retired from both UConn and New Britain Public Schools, she lives in Farmington and canoes at Crystal Lake, Ellington. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Episcopal Diocese of Connecticut] Barbara Campbell of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in New Britain has been invited by the bishops in the Diocese of Connecticut to be the first “Diocesan Poet.”But don’t think of this as some stuffy, distant appointment.“We invited Barbara to tap into our inner poet and claim a creative expression of our faith,” said Bishop Suffragan Laura J. Ahrens, who took the lead on this effort. “By calling her ‘Diocesan Poet’ we hope she’ll help all of us, as a diocese, to claim our collective poetic voices,” she said.Campbell understands her new role is more of an instigator than a distant expert, although she does come with credentials as a published poet.A retired high school and college teacher, she also has the first assignment.Love of poetryCampbell loves poetry and has been writing poems for decades — “since I got my first computer more than 30 years ago,” she said. Her favorite poets (whom she calls her “poetic heroes”) include Billy Collins, Mary Oliver, Martin Espada, and Emily Dickinson.She’s also an active lay woman serving in both parish and diocesan leadership, including St. Mark’s participation in a multi-year regional partnership to develop missional churches.The poetry is connected.“As Diocesan Poet, I encourage the writing of poetry as a way to continue to tell our stories,” she explained. “Directly related to us as Episcopalians is writing poems about our own reactions and those of others as we practice being missional, and our descriptions of living in a world and a church both constantly facing change. From time to time I will invite poetry written on a designated theme (see first invitation at end of article). If I can be an instigator of creativity, give an opportunity for a voice to be heard, encourage working as co-creators with God, the effort will be well-placed.”# # #The Remnantby Barbara A. Campbell(c) March 2012Like metal filings to a magnet,I am drawn to fabric stores.I roll my carriagethrough the new offeringsbut know I am headedto that corner of the storewhere the remnants are,usually strewn.I don’t mind the mess.I’m looking for that one piece of material,just the right size,perfect color and feelfor a special project.That bolt of material down to its last yardknows it is still worth$9.99 or $12.00 or even $24.00 a yard,so, too, those of us still in the churchknow our worth lies in God’s grace.We see, feel and know(we count the congregation)we are at the end of our boltand surrounded by new possibilities.From all those shirts and dresses –a warm quilt of memories,from the Red Tag shelf –the silky scarf so admired,from the tail ends of skeins –the knit laprobethat delights with color, warmth and prayer.What’s the next quilt, or scarf or laprobeGod’s fingers are itching to create?What relationships of color and texture and warmthwill transform this remnantinto a new creation?Within that grace,will I be able to follow Her pattern?More importantly,will I be willingto share my stash? Invitation #1: Annual Convention 2012The themes of the 2012 Diocesan Convention are “Claiming, Equipping and Sending Leaders in God’s Mission.”  I invite poets in the Diocese to look through their journals and/or consider writing poems which address those themes.Need a writing prompt? Here’s a few. It’s a broad topic. I’m being generous in options. Focus on one or two.As you consider your specific example of what God is already doing in God’s world and consider how you can or do join in: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska May 21, 2012 at 8:15 pm Is this serious? The poetry is atrocious. Youth Minister Lorton, VA By diocesan staffPosted May 21, 2012 Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Christopher Johnson says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME People Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Comments are closed. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books What’s the role of reflection as you lead in God’s mission? Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img read more

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New Zealand: ChristChurch Cathedral bells shipped to U.K. for restoration

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK don woolley says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Comments are closed. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Submit a Job Listing Anglican Communion Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Comments (1) Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Posted Oct 2, 2012 [Anglican Taonga] Bells rescued from ChristChurch Cathedral have been shipped to the English foundry where they were made for specialist restoration.The 13 bells were buried in tonnes of masonry when the tower collapsed in Christchurch’s Feb. 22, 2011 earthquake.Some suffered cracks and one looks to be damaged beyond repair.They have been transported free of charge by shipping company Maersk to John Taylor Bell Foundry in Loughborough, Leicestershire, where they were cast in 1978.Foundry boss Simon Adams said the Anglican Church had no option but to send them to England for expert repairs.“The bells fell from the tower of the cathedral and the entire contents of the belfry fell on top them,” he told BBC News Leicester.“We have to make 13 new sets of fittings for the bells – and undertake some specialist testing of the bells and further repairs.”Much of the cathedral’s taonga (artifacts) have been removed and put into safe storage, including stained-glass windows and the statue of the Risen Christ outside the west doors.Work is currently underway on a NZ$5.3 million (US$4.41 million) temporary cathedral on the edge of the city’s red zone cordon in Latimer Square which will be used by the congregation while ChristChurch Cathedral is rebuilt. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Zealand: ChristChurch Cathedral bells shipped to U.K. for restoration Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA March 14, 2014 at 8:38 pm hi,i have a bit of bell from the orginal bell made in late 1870 od,i did my time as a moulder and we mealted the old ones,i was allowed to keep a bit bell that i found,i have had this little bit of bell for about thirty seven years.i lost it for about three years after the quake bit have now found it, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

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