Education is the winner

first_imgSchool children at Imperial Primary School in Mitchell’s Plain, Cape Town. The 2007teachers’ strike lasted for six weeks andaffected millions of pupils. (Image: Wikimedia)Janine ErasmusA number of South African media houses together with the national Department of Education (DoE) received a prestigious award at the annual World Association of Newspapers Readership Conference held in mid-October 2008 in Amsterdam.Top honours went to the Polish daily Gazeta Wyborcza, which scooped the World Young Reader Newspaper of the Year award, while the group of four South African publishing companies and the national education body took the coveted Public Service award.The DoE and Independent Newspapers, Media 24, Avusa, and the Associated Independent Press were acknowledged for their proactive “National Teachers Strike Recovery Initiative” after the May 2007 strike all but brought education to a halt for six weeks. Representing 20 newspapers from across the country and a combined readership of almost 1.5-million, the companies worked together to rescue millions of pupils who were left stranded by teachers rebelling over a wage dispute.Learning material had to be quickly compiled from the current curriculum and adapted for all grades, socio-economic sectors and geographical locations. The DoE funded the initiative, paper manufacturer Mondi subsidised the newsprint, and the Learning Channel, an NGO that produces televised educational programmes, developed the revision material. The NGO also provides educational supplements for download on its website. The newspapers themselves sponsored all distribution and logistical costsStudy Mates, for grades 1 to 11, and Power Your Future, for grade 12, were published in the newspapers once a week and were gratefully received by pupils and those teachers who, at their own peril, stuck to their task in spite of threats and intimidation from their colleagues.Matrics were a particular focus of the supplements, which included not only learning material but also profiles of role models, career advice and previous sets of exam questions and answers.The material was also used by disadvantaged students to bring their studies up to a more satisfactory level. Although all South African students, from both privileged and disadvantaged backgrounds, write exactly the same exams, there is often a substantial difference in their ability to prepare for their exams, as those from poorer communities struggle to afford textbooks and other essentials. In many cases the newspaper material was the only resource available and not only prevented students from falling further behind in their learning but helped many of them advance more than they could have under normal circumstances.Published material has since been adopted as an integral part of the teaching process and is used by pupils as key study tools for exams. So successful was the project that the Department of Education decided to extend it into 2008.  A win-win situationAccording to the judges, the project was a win-win situation, and one that cut through red tape when speed was called for in a crisis situation. “It tackled a national problem with love and was also financially beneficial to those who conducted it,” said the judges.South African Minister of Education Naledi Pandor said, “I am delighted that this international award recognises our efforts to support high-quality learning. I wish to congratulate and thank all those newspapers involved in responding to our call to support our young learners.”The World Young Reader Prizes are presented annually by the World Association of Newspapers, a Paris-based organisation that defends and promotes freedom of the international press as well as the professional and business interests of newspapers world-wide. Its members number over 18 000 newspapers, 77 national newspaper associations, 12 news agencies and 11 regional and world-wide press groups in 102 countries.The Young Reader programme has been running since 1998 and honours those newspapers who, in the opinion of the judges, have devised the most innovative project or activity in the 24 months between award ceremonies, in one or more of the main areas of young readership development. These are editorial; making the news; literacy and newspapers; public service; and brand. In 2009 a new category will be introduced – press freedom.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Janine Erasmus at [email protected] storiesEducation in South AfricaSocial development in South AfricaUseful linksWorld Association of NewspapersThe Learning ChannelDepartment of Educationlast_img read more

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Blackmagic RAW Added to BMPCC4K with Blackmagic Camera Update 6.2

first_imgIf you’ve been eagerly waiting to shoot Blackmagic RAW on your Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K, the time has finally come.Today, Blackmagic made a couple of really great announcements. We got a new Ursa Pro update (300fps?!) and some really great advancements in some of their other peripherals.However, one of the most exciting and accessible new developments was the new Blackmagic Camera Update 6.2 —which adds Blackmagic RAW functionality to the Black Magic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K.This news sent me rushing for my BMPCC4K. The camera update is available now, meaning anyone who owns the camera can update now for free. As a result, I read the press release, and a mere 15 minutes later, I was shooting Blackmagic RAW (It always bothers me capitalizing that, as RAW isn’t actually an initialism, but alas it is the official name).Recording OptionsAs is the case with all the more recent Blackmagic releases, one of the true strengths is the number of available options.Blackmagic RAW functionality boasts options for constant bitrate and constant quality recording. I prefer to shoot in constant bitrate, which shoots the same bitrate regardless of the situation. This recording format is truly impressive. Even 12:1 BRAW is truly stunning in terms of both quality and versatility in post. To start, I had a 128GB SDHC card in the camera, and at this setting, I can shoot 77 minutes of RAW. Which is absolutely mind-boggling — especially when you get that footage into Resolve and take a look at what it can do.When set to constant quality, the camera shoots higher file sizes, and the file sizes themselves are constantly altering themselves due to the needs of that particular shot. This yields slightly richer and higher-quality images, but it tends to create unpredictably large file sizes.The camera, of course, still has all of the ProRes recording formats as well.The only downside to Blackmagic RAW is that there is currently no compatibility with NLEs other than Resolve. So if you want to edit your RAW files in Premiere, you’re going to have a bad time.I’m hoping that Adobe will support the codec in the near future, but I’m also worried that potential competition with ProRes Raw won’t hinder that development. We’ll see what happens. In the meantime, get out there and shoot some beautiful RAW footage, folks.last_img read more

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Chinmayanand case: lawyers move SC over missing victim

first_imgA group of lawyers here on Wednesday moved the Supreme Court requesting initiation of proceedings over the missing law student incident in Uttar Pradesh to avoid repeat of the Unnao incident.Suo motu cognisanceIn a letter to Chief Justice Ranjan Gogoi, a group of lawyers requested the court to take suo motu cognisance of the issue. They also mentioned the matter before the Bench headed by Justice N.V. Ramana.Initially, the court asked lawyers to approach the High Court but later asked them to submit the letter. It also assured them that it would look into the matter.The lawyers requested the court to issue notice to the U.P. government to trace the girl and provide police protection to her family. “We as a society can’t allow another Unnao case to happen,” it said.The National Commission for Women has issued a notice to the Uttar Pradesh police while the Uttar Pradesh Women Commission has sought a report from the Shahjahanpur district administration in the case.The NCW, which has taken a serious note of the incident, has urged the Uttar Pradesh Director General of Police to expeditiously investigate the allegations of harassment levelled by the student and ensure the safety of the girl and her family.“Considering the gravity of the matter, the commission is taking suo motu cognisance of this case and issued a notice to the DGP Uttar Pradesh to investigate this matter and send a detailed report to the commission. The commission had urged the DGP to ensure the safety of the girl and her family and also make sure that the investigation is done very quickly,” the NCW said in a statement.UPWC chief Vimla Batham also expressed her commitment to safe return of the girl, who had been pursuing her studies in a college run by Mr. Chinmayanand’s Mumukshu ashram. “We have taken note of the incident and sought a report from the district magistrate and superintendent of police of Shahjahapur. We are awaiting report,” Ms. Batham told reporters.The student went missing following her allegation in a video clip that she was under threat from the leader of the sant community, without naming Mr. Chinmayanand.last_img read more

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4-Star South Carolina Quarterback Commit Brandon McIlwain Weighing Football, Baseball Options After Spurrier Retirement

first_imgFour-star quarterback Brandon McIlwain looked like South Carolina’s quarterback of the future after making a good impression at the Elite 11 this summer, but with the abrupt retirement Steve Spurrier and his skyrocketing stock as a baseball prospect, he is rethinking his commitment. McIlwain received a visit from Penn State quarterbacks coach Ricky Rahne on Wednesday.Just had a home visit with Coach @RickyRahne ! .#PSU pic.twitter.com/ZytwCXKD8G— Brandon McIlwain (@BFMcIlwainqb12) December 3, 2015His mother, Lena McIlwain, reveals more about his pending decisions in a recent Facebook post. McIlwain is still considering South Carolina, but needs to hear from whomever takes over for Spurrier first. He’s also being recruited by other programs, and has emerged as a top prospect in the MLB Draft. WCIV Sports Director Scott Eisberg shared her post on Twitter.Not a big recruiting guy-but these posts sent to us-USC QB commit Brandon McIlwain’s mom a former Channel 4 staffer. pic.twitter.com/Nqumnh4N3w— Scott Eisberg (@SEisbergWCIV) December 3, 2015lena mcilwain brandon psu coach lena mcilwain brandon future mlb Yesterday, McIlwain was ranked eighth in an ESPN list of the nation’s top prep and college baseball [email protected] is number 8 on ESPN’s list! pic.twitter.com/BI6K4JtqYh— RockNorthBaseball (@crnorthbaseball) December 1, 2015As a potential first round pick in the MLB, and a Top 10 quarterback recruit, McIlwain has some serious decisions to make, especially with uncertainty surrounding the South Carolina job. It is hard to blame him for whatever he choses.last_img read more

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Report: Jalen Hurts Has “Won The Coaches And Team” At Alabama

first_imgAlabama's Bryant-Denny Stadium during a day gameInstagramCould Alabama start a true freshman at quarterback this season? According to Shannon B. Terry, Jalen Hurts has “won the coaches and team” heading into the 2016 season.Terry, the founder of 247Sports.com, took to Twitter on Monday afternoon to discuss Alabama’s quarterback situation heading into this year’s campaign. He notes that junior Cooper Bateman is “trending down”, redshirt freshman Blake Barnett is “improving” and true freshman Jalen Hurts has “won” the team over.Terry implies that even if Hurts isn’t named the starter at the beginning of the season, he expects him to be the quarterback by mid-season. That’s huge news, considering Hurts’ lack of experience.(1 of 2) #Alabama QB Bateman is trending down this fall, Barnett is improving and Hurts has won the coaches and team at this point.— Shannon B. Terry (@sbterry247) August 22, 2016(2 of 2) Only real decision 4 UA coaches is what is best way to develop Hurts? unless there’s a sig change, he will be the QB by mid-season— Shannon B. Terry (@sbterry247) August 22, 2016For the past two seasons, Alabama has turned to seniors to lead the team behind center. In 2014, Blake Sims helped the Crimson Tide reach the College Football Playoff. In 2015, it was Jake Coker leading the team to a national championship. Before that, it was AJ McCarron taking snaps for three seasons.Hurts getting the nod would be a surprise, but it’s never wise to doubt Nick Saban. It’ll be interesting to see who gets the call against USC.last_img read more

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Can Science Help Runners Break The Marathons 2Hour Barrier

When Kenyan Dennis Kimetto set the world record at the Berlin Marathon in 2014, his time, 2:02:57, made him the first runner to complete a marathon in less than two hours, three minutes. His time was 26 seconds faster than the previous record, set by fellow Kenyan Wilson Kipsang at the previous year’s Berlin Marathon. Such has the marathon world record progressed over the past 20 years: in increments measured in tens of seconds.But now three teams — one sponsored by Adidas, another backed by Nike, and one called SUB2 that’s being led by a team of academic researchers — are aiming to push the record nearly three minutes faster. Their audacious goal: to break the two-hour marathon mark.When Roger Bannister broke the four-minute mile in 1954, he did so as an amateur athlete, often training during his lunch breaks while attending medical school. By contrast, these two-hour marathon attempts are being made by professional runners handpicked by teams of researchers and bankrolled, in two cases, by corporations eager to show that their products can turn good runners into makers of history.We gathered a few of our favorite running science geeks to discuss the two-hour record, the current attempts to break it and whether these projects are good for the sport. The transcript has been lightly edited.Our participants:Christie Aschwanden is lead science writer at FiveThirtyEight.Wouter Hoogkamer studies the biomechanics, energetics and neurophysiology of running and other sports at the University of Colorado.Alex Hutchinson covers the science of endurance sport for Runner’s World and other publications.Steve Magness is coach to professional and collegiate runners and co-author of the book “Peak Performance.” christie: I want to start by asking (on behalf of our readers who aren’t marathoners): What is the magnitude of the goal here? Is breaking two hours a gargantuan feat? Or is this a technicality that will happen soon regardless?alex: Under “normal” circumstances, it’s very big. A few years ago, I predicted it would happen in 2075, which gives a sense of where my thinking was at that point.wouter: Without targeting some external factors to make it easier, it will be a long time before it happens.steve: Agreed. It’s a huge task. We’re looking at a several-decades jump in performance, at the minimum.christie: Is there some equivalent or analogy here that might help nonrunners understand the scope? How much faster is this record-breaker going to have to run?wouter: 2.5 percent faster.alex: For comparison, Usain Bolt has improved the 100-meter record by 1.6 percent, if I recall correctly.christie: Wow, that makes this look like a pipe dream.alex: And Paula Radcliffe improved the women’s marathon record by about 2.5 percent.wouter: In two increments, though, Alex.1Radcliffe broke Catherine Ndereba’s record of 2:18:47 with a time of 2:17:18, then broke that with the current record of 2:15:25.steve: I think the important thing is it’s a long, long way from our current reality.christie: So what makes the folks behind these three projects think they can do it?alex: People have been aware for a few years that there’s some “low-hanging fruit,” like optimizing the course and pacing, that would bring the goal much closer. It’s been a question of when someone would believe it’s close enough to invest money to make those things happen.wouter: Exactly.steve: Personally, I think it’s scientific arrogance and naivete that makes them think they can get it done within months/years. Can they drop the world record? Of course. But to get sub two hours is another question.alex: In rough terms, I always figured the “easy” stuff could get us halfway there. For Nike, I suspect it was their development of a new shoe that made them believe they could bridge the other half. Not sure about the other two.christie: Does science have a track record for facilitating faster running times? How much of the previous records are attributable to scientific advances?steve: As a coach and exercise scientist, I’d say the advancements due to science are minimal, at best. That seems like sacrilege, but if we look at the drops in time, they aren’t athletes training utilizing scientific gadgets. They are East Africans training with coaches doing standard training. The one advancement that has contributed in the marathon is refining of fuel intake.alex: I think running improvements are less influenced by science than almost any other sport. But there are still effects: equipment, track surfaces, etc.steve: When we look at running, science only adds the very small finishing touches. We’re talking fractions of a percent here and there.wouter: Outside running, there are multiple examples of where technology improvements have substantially improved sports performance: pole vault pole, clapskates for speed skating. Kimetto’s world marathon record was set with a shoe with a midsole material that has been shown to save 1 percent of energy.steve: But does 1 percent energy saving result in 1 percent improvement? I’d highly doubt so. Yet that’s what people immediately jump to. They think, “Oh, I’m 1 percent more efficient, so I’m 1 percent faster.” But it doesn’t work like that.alex: I think Wouter might disagree that changes in efficiency don’t translate to changes in race speed!wouter: Correct. We showed that adding 100 grams to shoes costs about 0.8 percent more energy and makes you run about 0.8 percent slower.alex: Of course, whether that holds true over 26.2 miles is a very big question!wouter: The relationship might not be perfectly linear at high speeds due to the effect of air resistance.steve: The marathon is a different ball game. In the shorter events, the physiology is mainly the limiting factor. When we get to the marathon, the causes of fatigue multiply.christie: So what are the limiting factors in the marathon?steve: Factors that all could be the weak link in the chain depend on the athlete and the race, things like fuel utilization, muscle damage or cramping, mental fatigue or psychological coping, and on and on.Basically, in the marathon, there are a lot more pipes that can burst than, say, in a mile or a 5K.alex: It’s important to note that Nike’s project, at least, isn’t really trying to change any of these traditional limiting factors. (I should add that Nike would probably disagree with that characterization, but it’s my take.) They’re instead trying to optimize some of the well-understood limiting factors like air resistance, as well as course details like the number of hills and turns.christie: Alex, you’ve reported on the different projects. What distinguishes them?alex: I know basically nothing about the Adidas project other than that they have a pair of shoes. The Nike and SUB2 projects are somewhat similar in the tactics they’re trying, with the difference that Nike has a lot more money and is staging its own event instead of using an existing race.wouter: I think that is the most important part of their approach.alex: Even more important than the shoes? 🙂wouter: Current races are not optimized to run as fast as possible, coursewise.christie: So what makes for fast conditions?steve: Flat course, perfect racing temperature (45 degrees or so), fewer turns. If you want to truly optimize, you’d have a slightly downhill finish.alex: Wouter’s dream course, outlined in his recent paper, was a flat, sheltered loop for the first half, followed by a gradual downhill (just within the 1 meter-in-1,000 rules for record-eligible courses) for the second half. I pretty much agree, except I might save the downhill portion for the last six miles, when things really get tough.christie: Track and field’s governing body, IAAF, has rules for what makes a legal course: a maximum overall drop in elevation of no more than 42 meters and a start and finish that are no more than 13.1 miles apart, as the crow flies, to prevent aid from a tailwind.wouter: We say you need to look for a course that drops exactly 42 meters. Same for the wind, if we can go 13.1 miles in one way, let’s do it and make sure you have a tailwind there and limit the negative effects of wind during the first half.christie: You also mention drafting.wouter: Yes, that’s the final strategy. The problem is you would need four guys who run a 2:03 marathon all running the same race and collaborating, and that won’t happen without serious monetary incentives.christie: How many runners are currently capable of that kind of time?steve: If they are all on their best at the same time (which never happens), four.wouter: Right, it’s not very likely. But if you could bring two of them together, and apply the downhill, tailwind and shoe technology, they’d have a fair shot.christie: Why is it so hard to run a perfect marathon?steve: There’s a reason that at most major marathons, with all the best guys trying to run fast, you are normally left with one, maybe two survivors — despite almost a dozen of them on the starting line who are able to run in the 2:04 range. We forget that these are humans, not machines. The training it takes to even get in 2:03-04 fitness is crazy. Marathoners live near the edge. They do as much as possible without falling over the cliff of overtraining or injury.alex: Steve’s point is important. If you compare the start list to the finish results at major marathons, it’s like, “What happened to all those fast guys?”That’s one reason I was pretty surprised that Nike went with a team of just three runners. Even getting to the start line of a marathon is a low-odds game. On these points, it comes down to “will it happen on any given day?” rather than “can it happen in theory?”christie: So the proposed approaches include a fast course, drafting and fast shoes. The SUB2 team also has a newfangled sports drink. How likely are any of these to make the difference?alex: I’d say a fast course, drafting and shoes are the big ones. There are lots of other things people are doing, but they’re not make or break. Nike’s not doing much new with sports drinks — just trying to make sure the athletes execute best practices, which not everyone does even at the elite level. The SUB2 project has an interesting new drink that makes some bold claims but hasn’t published any data to back it up yet.steve: And we haven’t even touched on the biggest limiting factor: the psychology of it all …christie: How does psychology play in, Steve?steve: You’re almost three minutes from the record. These guys are going through the half-marathon at near their half personal record. People think that “elites” are invincible mentally. But they freak out, they panic if they are too fast or slow, even if they don’t show it. The way fatigue works is a comparison to our prior experience and our current context. If your prior experience is nowhere near what you are trying to do, your body’s default setting is to freak out.alex: There’s that famous Herb Elliott quote about how, to set a world record, you have to have the arrogance to believe that you can be better than anyone else in history and then the humility to actually do it. Everyone who does it starts with an arrogance that is basically irrational, and most people will never do something that justifies that arrogance — but without it, you don’t even come close. Anyway, Nike (and SUB2, etc.) clearly have the arrogance, but the jury is still out about the humility.christie: I want to switch gears for a moment. Last week, we learned that the women’s gold medalist in the Olympic marathon in Rio, Jemima Sumgong from Kenya, has tested positive for the blood booster EPO. At this year’s Sloan Sports Analytics conference, Peter Weyand, a researcher on the SUB2 team, argued that their project could show athletes that there’s a way to excel with science that doesn’t send the sport down what he called the “pharmaceutical gene-doping freak show.” What do you all think? Could he be right, or is this just naive optimism?steve: I think it’s naive optimism, and Peter was my adviser during undergrad, so I can say that! The money and fame in running sub two are enormous. We still use Roger Bannister as an example of a barrier breaker nearly 70 years later! With that much to gain, athletes, coaches, agents, even sponsors will take risks. Athletes are already taking risks for much lower payoffs. If the payoff is that large, you bet it will bring doping into it.wouter: I don’t think the sub-two-hour quest will encourage doping more than gold medals and “regular” prize money.alex: I’ve been totally baffled by that message from the SUB2 team. Everyone wants to run fast and beat people, so it’s not clear to me why one sub-two project would encourage more doping and the other would encourage less!steve: We’re talking about all these measures that may improve a half percent here or there. EPO can improve performance by up to 6 percent, according to some research!christie: This leads me to another question: How important is it, really, to reach this arbitrary number? The marathon distance is an artificial construct, and the two-hour mark is just a function of our love of round numbers, right? I don’t recall anyone getting excited about breaking the 2:03 mark.alex: Well, I was pretty excited.christie: Ha!steve: Ha, so was I. But it’s a round number, like a four-minute mile or a 10-second 100 meter. So, yes, it will capture our imagination.christie: If it were the women’s record that stood this close to the two-hour mark, would there be as much interest?alex: You know the answer to that, unfortunately, Christie.christie: 😞alex: That said, that’s one area where this sport isn’t too bad. Think of the biggest marathon stars in the American firmament — Deena Kastor, Shalane Flanagan, Kara Goucher, etc. There’s definitely respect for female accomplishments.christie: Most of the major marathons have equity in prize money, right?alex: Yes, as far as I know.steve: Exactly. Compared to most other sports, running is much more progressive. As someone who coaches mostly professional women marathoners, I wish it was more even in popularity. But you are seeing more split coverage and starting times so that the women’s race gets equal coverage. Which is huge.wouter: There are also scientific papers on the women’s equivalent of the two-hour marathon.christie: That research says the women’s equivalent of the two-hour marathon “has already been achieved.” 🏆steve: That’s because Radcliffe’s 2:15 is such a large outlier.christie: Right. It has stood for 14 years!alex: Put those worms back in that can!steve: I didn’t say why! I just said it was far better than anything else we’ve seen!christie: I want to finish by asking: Is the pursuit of the sub-two-hour marathon good for the sport?steve: I think it’s bad for the sport. We’re getting further and further away from what makes sport interesting: competition. Our obsessive drive for faster has hurt track and field as it is. We set ourselves up for failure by hyping up world records and then being disappointed when they do not occur. If we ever want to have this sport gain popularity, we need to take it back to its roots. Draw a line on the street and race to the next light pole. That’s the essence of running. These gimmicky approaches using artificial environments just push us further away from competition. Yeah, it’s great to see where limits lie, but I think this will push us more toward doping and a focus on times.alex: I should start by saying that I recognize many of the concerns that people have. I, too, love good, old-fashioned competition for the sake of head-to-head racing, instead of commercialized mega-events. But even with those caveats, my general sense is that it’s a net positive. I can’t overstate the number of people I’ve heard from whose messages start with some version of “I don’t usually follow running, but I saw your article on the sub-two thing and wanted to ask. …”wouter: Well, I think it’s definitely good for science. Everything we learn from what’s limiting human (sports) performance will have the potential to be used somewhere down the road in making walking easier for specific patient populations, which has many known benefits.alex: Ultimately, the sport is driven by what people want to see. Many people within the sport say “the focus on times is bad.” And many others watch the Olympics (where, e.g., the men’s 1,500 was the slowest time since 1932) and say “the focus on competition rather than time is bad.” To me, those are both interesting aspects of the sport, at opposite poles. I don’t want all one or the other, but neither do I want to get rid of one aspect entirely.christie: Yeah, although I lean toward Steve’s point of view here, the fact that it’s garnering more attention for the sport seems like a good thing.Wouter, you’re running the Boston Marathon on Monday. Do you have a time goal?wouter: I aim for sub-2:40.alex: Good luck, Wouter. Hope you’ve got some cooperative drafting lined up!wouter: Using the downhill and cooperative drafting. Regular shoes, though.christie: Best of luck! Only 40 more minutes to shave off … 😜Thanks for being here, everyone. read more

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Urban Meyers recruiting knows no bounds

For Ohio State coach Urban Meyer, going out of state to recruit the top players in the country isn’t foreign territory. Meyer already has seven out-of-state high school players who have verbally committed to OSU for the 2013 season. Recruits from New Jersey, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Missouri, Florida, Texas and California will represent the Buckeyes in the 2013 football season. Marc Givler, recruiting analyst at BuckeyeGrove.com, said there are several reasons for Meyer’s success when it comes to out-of-state recruiting, including his coaching experiences in different regions of the country. “He’s coached in Ohio so he’s got the Midwest ties, he’s coached in Utah so he has the West Coast ties and he’s coached in Florida so he’s got the Southeast ties,” Givler said. “He’s built all these relationships with high school coaches across the country, so it’s pretty easy for him to get in the door.” Meyer can’t take all the credit for out-of-state recruiting because his assistants within his staff have played a major role in getting these players as well. When Meyer assembled his coaching staff, he did so with recruiting in mind. “This staff was put together with a purpose,” Meyer said on National Signing Day Feb. 1. “And recruiting was without question a purpose in putting together this staff.” Kevin Noon, managing editor for BuckeyeGrove.com, said assembling a national staff of assistant coaches has been pivotal in Meyer’s success. “He’s able to go into Texas because of (offensive coordinator) Tom Herman and he’s able to go into North Carolina because of (co-defensive coordinator) Everett Withers, so he has some reach thanks to the guys working for him,” Noon said. In addition to recruiting players from around the country, Meyer has also maintained OSU’s appeal to in-state athletes. Givler said it is equally important for Meyer to win Ohio and keep in-state high schools happy. “You have to keep healthy relationships with high school coaches and players within Ohio also, because you don’t want to alienate yourself from your own state,” Givler said. “Meyer’s done a good job of keeping the balance.” Meyer’s theory is simple, which is to get the most talented players regardless of what state they are from. Noon said Meyer, along with all coaches, will always go national with recruiting because it’s all about getting the best available talent to help win games. “It all comes down to winning games, competing for the Big Ten and competing for a national championship in a couple of years,” Noon said. “If you can’t find certain talent in your own state, then it’s natural to go looking for it on the national level.” Steve Helwagen, managing editor for Bucknuts.com, said quarterback prospect J.T. Barrett, out of Rider High School in Wichita Falls, Texas, is one of Meyer’s most impressive out-of-state recruits. “The scouts have him listed as the No. 1 run-pass quarterback because he can drop back and throw from the pro style, or he can take off and be effective running the ball,” Helwagen said. Joey Bosa, a 6-foot-4, 225-pound defensive end from Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and Lewis Neal, a 6-foot-1, 232-pound defensive end from Wilson, N.C., are Meyer’s most recent committed recruits. Helwagen said OSU will always be a popular destination for national recruits with Meyer as coach. “He’s won two national championships,” Helwagen said. “He’s produced a bunch of NFL guys, his reputation along with Ohio State’s tradition is what kids want to be a part of.” read more

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We need to stay together Joachim Low

first_imgThe Germany national team manager knows his squad is having a bad time but he believes if everybody works together they can get betterThe German national team lost 3-0 against the Netherlands in the latest match of the UEFA Nations League.And many have claimed they want the Nationalmannschaft to sack manager Joachim Low.But the German boss says his team needs to stay together to get out of their current problem.“Of course the defeat to the Netherlands was painful for the players, the coaches, and all the fans,” he told the national team’s official club.“I know already that we cannot get back to the highest level if we continue like this. It is a process which will have setbacks along the way. We have analyzed the game and discussed what went wrong with each other.”“It’s clear that we need to stay together as a group. At the moment though, it is more important to me that we get the players back motivated and ready for the game,” he commented.Top 5 Bundesliga players to watch during the weekend Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 11, 2019 With the international activity cooling down for the next month, we go back to the Bundesliga’s Top 5 players to watch next weekend.The German…“Obviously there was going to be a lot of criticism after the last game, but I just try and block that all out.”“The game tomorrow is all that matters now and we need to show the right response, as well as a better performance,” Low explained.“Our job is to ignore what others are saying and dealing with the pressure, something I feel I am good at.”Löw: “It’s obvious that we need to stick together. Above all, it was important to pick the team up again and take the right steps for tomorrow.” #FRAGER pic.twitter.com/wxC9j95ro2— Germany (@DFB_Team_EN) October 15, 2018last_img read more

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Sarris postmatch reaction inspired City win – Rudiger reveals

first_imgChelsea defender Antonio Rudiger has revealed that Maurizio Sarri’s terrifying post-match reaction after the loss to Wolves inspired the win over City.The Blues suffered a disappointing 2-1 defeat to Wolverhampton Wanderers last Wednesday despite taking the lead in the first half.The loss to Wolves handed Sarri only his second defeat as Chelsea boss but put a dent to their title aspirations.However, the Blues bounced back with an emphatic 2-0 win over champions Manchester City, ending Pep Guardiola’s side unbeaten run in the Premier League, thanks to goals from N’Golo Kante and David Luiz.Sacchi explains Sarri, Conte, and Ancelotti Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Arrigo Sacchi talked about how Sarri has a tougher time at Juventus than Conte at Inter; while Ancelotti’s “blood is boiling” at Napoli.Arrigo Sacchi…“After the Wolves game, he was terrifying,” Rudiger said, according to ESPN. “He was going crazy. But that was OK, because we shouldn’t have lost this match.”“The day after, he was very calm and clear-minded. He spoke with us and made it clear that we have to believe in ourselves. He wanted us to go into the City game looking for the win.”last_img read more

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