Are Gray Charges Bleeding Red Ink From Your Credit Cards? [Infographic]

first_img“Mr. Proffitt, we wanted to inquire about possible fraudulent charges on your account made yesterday…”And with that, my day went to heck in a hand basket.It turns out that somehow somebody got a hold of my credit card and managed to rack up some interesting charges at a big-box electronics store a few towns over. The good news is, the fraud division at my bank flagged them and the charges were quickly removed and after filing a police report (a requirement here in Indiana), the matter was closed and I had a new credit card in hand by the end of the week.That’s when things got interesting.It turns out that on this card, which I used mostly for personal purchases, there were a number of recurring charges that I’d neglected to check up on over the years, and discovered only after the original card number had been shut down and the vendors came calling for their next monthly payment.Legal, But Not GoodThese are known as “gray charges,” legal but sometimes unexpected or forgotten charges to a credit card that just keep hitting an account indefinitely.In my case, some of the charges were perfectly fine: Netflix pinged me when because I hadn’t changed my account payment information before the first of the month (I’d forgotten that I’d started Netflix on this card and not my debit card). The New York Times, the same thing.But I also got requests for payment from things that should have been dropped a long time ago. An annual fee for an aviation website that I’d used when I was actually using my private pilot’s license; a credit reporting service fee that I was reasonably sure I’d cancelled.One In Four Are VictimsAccording to transaction monitors BillGuard, I’m not alone. One in four consumers have been tagged with these gray charges, which typically accumulate like barnacles on your account as the years go by. Even diligent-ish bill payers like me may miss them, especially when charges aren’t made on a regular basis.Getting a new credit card was a pain, but it also prompted me to scrape off those barnacles on my account. Fortunately, there were only these two, which were costing me about $146 annually. I was lucky; BillGuard estimates that the average gray charge victim racks up an average of $356/year in grey charges.Because the Holidays are an especially good time for these kinds of charges to glom onto your cards, BillGuard has published a useful infographic detailing the problem and ways to look out for charges like this, which often ride the bleeding edge of legality. Tags:#e-commerce Related Posts Title image courtesy of Shutterstock. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… brian proffittlast_img read more

Read More →

STATE OF ORIGIN & INTERSTATE CHALLENGE ROUND 2

first_imgFollowing NSW’s brilliant start to the 2004 State of Origin and Interstate Challenge, here are the results as Queensland try to keep the series alive. These results will be updated regularly throughout the day. Results and statistics for the State of Origin and Interstate Challenge can also be accessed via the following link: STATE OF ORIGIN/INTERSTATE CHALLENGE RESULTS/STATISTICS State of Origin and Interstate Challenge Results and Summary Round 2: Mixed Open: NSW def Qld 5-3 Touchdowns NSW: Belinda Patterson (2), Nash Beeby, Dave Stewart, Brent Powell Touchdowns Qld: Luke Feldman, Adam Falzon, Rebecca Houston Series: 2-0 NSW Womens 20’s: Qld defeated NSW 3-2 (drop-off) Touchdowns Qld: Rebecca Knight (2), Natasha Fry Touchdowns NSW: Kristen Boss, Gemma Carey Series: 1-1 Mens 20’s: Qld defeated NSW 6-5 Touchdowns Qld: Brendan Thimble, Gian Guerra, Matthew Baker, David Denning, Sebe Rey, James Harrington Touchdowns NSW: Andrew Baggio, Daniel Brown, Pat Smith, Glen De Witt, Joesph Karam Series: 2-0 Qld Womens 30’s: NSW def Qld 4-3 Touchdowns NSW: Kirsty Inglis, Chantel Byrnes, Renee Sealey, Cristy Hornery Touchdowns Qld: Brenda Johnston, Simone Pearce, Kerry Strasser Series: 2-0 NSW Mens 30’s: Qld defeated NSW 4-3 Touchdowns Qld: Wayne Grant, Kevin Ekersley, Craig Morrow, Scott Pierce Touchdowns NSW: Lars Hanson, Wayne Gleeson, Scott Danswan Series: 1-1 Womens 35’s: Qld defeated NSW 3-1 Touchdowns Qld: Kay Lenitschek (2), Haylene Grogan Touchdowns NSW: Lyn Eason Series: 1-1 Mens 35’s: NSW defeated Qld 7-3 Touchdowns NSW: David McDonald (3), Kim Sojun (2), Lenny Ryan, Mick Lennon Touchdowns Qld: Sean Slinger, Greg Lisle, Tere Wotherspoon Series: 2-0 NSW Womens 40’s: NSW defeated Qld 4-2 Touchdowns NSW: Michelle Schmidt, Kim Wiles, Rowena Hines, Cherie Green Touchdowns Qld: Debbie Jukes, Joyce Sills Series: 2-0 NSW Mens 40’s: NSW def Qld 6-3 Touchdowns NSW: Brett Gillard (2), Andrew Proust (2) Mark Jannson, Mark Hearndon Touchdowns Qld: David Kafoa, Mark Heironymus, Ashley Taylor Series: 2-0 NSW Mens 45’s: Qld defeated NSW 4-3 (drop-off) Touchdowns Qld: Tony Lacaze (2), John Mason, Michael Thoars Touchdowns NSW: Mark Nichols, Ron Wall Series: 2-0 Qld Mens 50’s: NSW def Qld 3-0 Touchdowns NSW: Paul Healey, Colin Thomas, Peter Vincent Touchdowns Qld: – Series: 2-0 NSW Womens Open: NSW defeated 9-1 Touchdowns NSW: Melissa Pitfield (2), Natalie Conway, Bo De La Cruz, Rachael Holden, Kirsty Jenkins, Stephanie Sorrenson, Amanda Judd, Kristy Judd Touchdowns Qld: Kate Adams Series: 2-0 NSW Mens Open: NSW defeated Qld 7-6 Touchdowns NSW: Jamie Stowe, Jason Yee, Anthony Ziade, Jason Stanton, Dean Wilbow, Garry Sonda, Joel Willoughby Touchdowns Qld: Chris Farrow, Beaudene Currie, Craig Searston, Troy Clark, Gavin Shuker, Stephen Swan Series: 2-0 NSW INTERSTATE CHALLENGE SERIES: After Queensland’s less than brilliant start yesterday, only winning two of the thirteen round one games, they were out to take as many of the divisions as possible to a third and deciding match. In the Womens 30’s, the Mens 40’s and Mens 50’s NSW once again controlled the match, taking all three of those series’ to an unbeatable 2-1 lead. However, the Queenslanders were not about to let that trend continue. The Queensland Womens 20’s fought back from yesterday’s 3-2 loss, keeping their series alive with another 3-2 scoreline. This time though, it was Queensland who left the field cheering, winning in an exciting drop-off. The Womens 35’s also recorded a win to keep their series alive, Kay Lenitschek scoring twice to help them to a 3-1 victory. The Queensland Mens 30’s scored what many considered to be an upset, beating NSW 4-3 and taking their series to a deciding match. It was in the Mens 20’s that Queensland broke the NSW winning trend, taking an unbeatable series lead, with a 6-5 win. The young men provided 11 individual scorers in that match, highlighting the depth of talent in Australia’s youth. The Mens 45’s also provided excitement for the crowd, a win in the drop-off giving them the series win for their division. NSW’s Mens 35’s cruised to an unbeatable lead in their series, after three touchdowns by David McDonald gave them a comfortable 7-3 win. STATE OF ORIGIN SUMMARY: Their 2003 title defense and the 2004 title was on the line for the Queensland Mens and Womens Open sides in round two. The Queensland Women, were unfortunately, outclassed by the Blues from beginning to end. The 9-1 whitewash an excellent result for the NSW but slightly more than disappointing for the Queenslanders. Melissa Pitfield scored twice for NSW, but it was the depth of Australian representatives such as Bo De La Cruz, Rachael Holden, Kirsty Jenkins and the Judd sisters, that gave NSW the win. The Mens round two match promised excitement after the close match last night. Queensland took an early lead 2-0 before Joel Willoughby brought one back for the Blue. Desperate touches and great fingertip control provided great touch for the 2000 people that packed out the grandstand and surrounds of the Canterbury Velodrome. Jason Stanton was virtually unstoppable for NSW, assisting as well as scoring himself. When NSW scored again for a 7-4 lead it looked as though Queensland were out of chances. The sin-binning of Jamie Stowe and the following penalty touchdown brought the Queenslanders hope and after scoring again, the score was back to 7-6. While Queensland looked in with a shot at stealing the match and bringing the series to a deciding third match, they ran out of time. With one match in both the Mens and Womens still to play, NSW have claimed the 2004 State of Origin title. A well deserved win. By Rachel Moyle, [email protected]last_img read more

Read More →

10 months agoFiorentina midfielder Jordan Veretout interesting Napoli

first_imgFiorentina midfielder Jordan Veretout interesting Napoliby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFiorentina midfielder Jordan Veretout is interesting Napoli.The former Aston Villa ace has been outstanding for the Viola this season.“I won’t even talk about the transfer market when it comes to him,” Mario Giuffredi said on Radio Kiss Kiss Napoli.“He’ll stay at Fiorentina, then in the summer we’ll see. I think he’s destined for a career at the highest level, but January isn’t the right time for him to move.“He wants to finish the season in Florence, as does [Cristiano] Biraghi. Veretout is liked by Napoli and many other teams, but it’s pointless talking about the transfer market for these lads.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Read More →

a month agoMauricio Pochettino remains top of Real Madrid shortlist

first_imgMauricio Pochettino remains top of Real Madrid shortlistby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveMauricio Pochettino remains Real Madrid’s number one target, should they part ways with Zinedine Zidane.World Cup winner Zidane is already under pressure to keep his job after re-joining the club towards the end of last season.It is not clear whether Pochettino wants to leave Spurs, considering he signed a five-year contract extension in 2018.But the Mirror says Real will be ready to pounce if the Argentine hints at wanting to leave North London.Los Blancos are convinced of Pochettino’s pedigree after he guided Spurs to the Champions League final last season.Some reports have suggested Pochettino is frustrated with Spurs after last summer’s transfer window. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Read More →

Cooks doppelganger Williams is Apples best bet as next CEO

first_imgNew Delhi: Considered a “colourless, unimaginable drone”, Timothy Donald Cook who joined Apple at age 37 in 1998 has successfully proved he is a better CEO than late Steve Jobs. Apple today is nearly a $1 trillion dollar company and despite the global slowdown, has been able to not only maintain its growth trajectory but also diversified into services, entertainment and other verticals which are bringing in more moolah than its devices segment. Also Read – Swiggy now in 500 Indian cities, targets 100 more this year Cook has spent over two decades at Apple, and nine years as CEO, and people across the globe now have a valid question: who is Apple’s best bet to replace Cook as CEO and keep the company on the growth path? For Jobs, Cook was the natural choice and he picked him over more popular names around for the CEO job, like legendary Apple Chief Designer Jony Ive (who has now moved on). Cook became COO in 2005, and officially Jobs’ right hand man. Identifying his unique set of strengths, Jobs made him the Apple CEO on August 24, 2011. Also Read – New HP Pavilion x360 notebook with in-built Alexa in India In December 2015, Cook promoted his long-time lieutenant in operation – Jeff Williams – to the role of Apple COO. The duo later created history. Williams has been called “Tim Cook’s Tim Cook”. He is in charge of the operations side of the business, just as Cook used to head up operations when Jobs was CEO. “There are uncanny number of similarities between Williams and Cook,” writes journalist Leander Kahney in his biography of Tim Cook. According to Fortune reporter Adam Lashinsky, “Williams is in many ways a doppelganger for Cook”. “Tall, lean, and grey-haired, like Cook, Williams was said by Apple executives to look so much like his boss that from behind, they could be mistaken for each other,” writes Lashinsky in his book “Inside Apple”. Since 2010, Williams has overseen Apple’s entire supply chain, service and support and social responsibility initiatives — the “last being something that has grown in importance under Cook”. According to Kahney, Williams has been instrumental in speeding up the iPod delivery process, making it possible for customers to buy an iPod online, have it custom engraved, and delivered in three working days. He is also said to be a key contact with supplier Foxconn. According to Apple analyst Neil Cybart, “Williams is tasked with making sure the Apple machine is well-oiled and in tip-top shape, not only capable of producing more than 100 million iOS devices in a quarter, but building flexibility into the system to handle annual hardware updates that would make most hardware companies quiver with fear.” Williams played an important role in the development of the first-generation iPhone, and has since led worldwide operations for both iPhone and iPod. Today, he also supervises development for Apple Watch. Often called the “unsung hero”, he led the development of Apple Watch in close collaboration with the design team, and oversees the engineering teams responsible for Apple Watch. According to Apple, he is also driving the company’s health initiatives, pioneering new technologies and advancing medical research to empower people to better understand and manage their health and fitness. Williams joined Apple in 1998 — the year Cook joined the company — as head of Worldwide Procurement. Prior to Apple, he worked for the IBM Corporation — Cook also worked with IBM before joining Apple — from 1985 to 1998 in a number of operations and engineering roles. Like Jobs, the passing on the Apple baton to Williams is a natural choice for Cook too. Cook is still going strong and Apple, under his watch, is breaking all sorts of records. With Jobs’ ‘spiritual partner’ Sir Jony Ive now out of Apple, Williams is without doubt Apple’s best bet to take over when Cook finally decides to move on.last_img read more

Read More →

Did Your Team Blow It At The Trade Deadline

The Blue Jays bought, the Tigers sold and the Mets couldn’t make up their mind. Baseball’s trade deadline, which passed last Friday afternoon, is all about balancing the present against the future. Whether they’re buyers or sellers (or just renters), all deadline-dealers have to evaluate both their World Series chances for the current season and where they will be in the “success cycle” going forward. Blunders in either type of assessment can haunt a franchise for years.It’s a lot to deal with, and not every team manages the process perfectly. To help model these deadline decisions, we developed a metric we’ve nicknamed the “Doyle Number.” It’s named after the infamous 1987 trade in which the Detroit Tigers sent future Hall of Famer John Smoltz, then a 20-year-old prospect, to the Atlanta Braves for 36-year-old Doyle Alexander.In principle, the definition of the Doyle Number is simple. It represents the rate at which, at the trade deadline, teams should be willing to trade talent in the future for talent in the current season in order to maximize the total number of World Series that it wins. For instance, if a team has a Doyle Number of 2, that means buying a win’s worth of talent in the current season1Note our phrasing here: By a “win’s worth of talent,” we mean a win per 162 games. This won’t be worth a full win in the standings as of the trade deadline because there are only 60 or so games left to play. As we’ll describe later, however, much of the benefit of acquiring players at the trade deadline comes from improving the roster for the postseason rather than during the balance of the regular season. at the trade deadline is worth giving up two wins in the future. By contrast, a team with a Doyle Number of 0.25 should only be willing to give up one-quarter of a future win for a win now. Not only should such a team not buy wins at that price — it should probably sell veteran talent at the deadline instead, in exchange for prospects.The Doyle Number is calculated based on a team’s estimated “true talent,” a concept that’s equivalent to its projected winning percentage for the rest of the year, as of the trade deadline.2This can be measured by any number of gauges; in this case, we used the most predictive cocktail of preseason statistical forecasts and betting over/unders, updated in-season with pythagorean records. The Doyle also includes the team’s odds of making the divisional playoff round.3In other words, we’re essentially ignoring the wild card “play-in” game. In practice, the calculation gets slightly involved, so we’ve reserved most of the methodological discussion for the footnotes.4First, our model projects a team’s odds of reaching the divisional playoffs in the current season as a function of its estimated true talent and its “coin flip mode” playoff odds (its odds of making the playoffs if every remaining game were 50/50) as of July 31. This allows us to estimate how a team’s playoff odds change if it adds or subtracts talent at the deadline.To calculate a team’s chance of winning the World Series, conditional upon reaching the playoffs, we use a binomial distribution to estimate its chance of winning a five-game divisional series, a seven-game league championship series, and a seven-game World Series against opponents with 90-win true talent, which is the historical average for teams that reached the divisional playoffs.Through a similar process, our model also calculates a team’s chances of winning the World Series in each of the six subsequent seasons. The model accounts for the fact that a team’s true talent level regresses fairly heavily toward the mean of an 81-81 record, but that the margin of error increases the more years you project a team’s record into the future.The model assumes that for each win a team adds at the trade deadline, it subtracts one-sixth of a win in each of the next six seasons. For example, a team that adds six wins of true talent at the 2015 trade deadline will have one win of true talent subtracted from its projection in each year from 2016 through 2021.The Doyle Number acts as a multiplier on a team’s future win projection. For instance, at a Doyle Number of 2, the aforementioned team would lose two wins of talent from its projection in future seasons instead of one. The Doyle Number is set such that by adding an epsilon of talent, the net change in the number of World Series a team projects to win over current and future seasons is zero — in other words, the point at which the near-term benefit from making the trade exactly offsets the long-term cost.But it’s important to pay attention to that two-word phrase we used above: “World Series.” In Doyle, it’s all about the rings! A lot of previous analyses, including some that we’ve published ourselves, have focused on a team’s chance of making the playoffs. If that’s your main goal, you’ll eventually encounter diminishing returns: A team with 100-win talent as of the trade deadline is all but certain to make the playoffs, for instance, so adding more talent won’t accomplish very much.Winning a championship is another matter, however. It’s hard for any team to win the World Series, but it’s much harder for a team, like the 2005 San Diego Padres, that sneaks into the playoffs with a league-average roster. Just as in the NCAA basketball tournament, relatively modest talent differentials can compound over several playoff rounds. A team with 80-win talent has only about a 5 percent chance of winning the World Series, conditional on making the divisional playoffs; a team with 90-win talent has a 12 percent chance. A team with 100-win talent has a 24 percent chance.One of the biggest lessons of Doyle, in fact, is that adding the talent to win once you’re in the playoffs is probably more important than picking up enough talent to merely get there. The point at which adding an extra win of talent stops accelerating a playoff team’s World Series odds upward is about 118 wins — a level of true talent reserved for the best All-Star teams ever. Realistically, you can never add too much talent if you’re gearing up to win a World Series.But let’s see how this plays out in practice. Below, we’ve listed the Doyle Number for the 30 major league teams as of the trade deadline last week.The highest Doyle Number (2.07) belongs to the St. Louis Cardinals, who are probably the best team in baseball, with more than 96 wins of talent and a 21 percent likelihood of winning the World Series. Even though St. Louis already had a completely stacked roster and a very high likelihood of making the division series without any trades, the increase in championship probability upon entering the MLB postseason would have made even a lopsided long-term trade worth it. The Cardinals should have been prepared to give away as many as two wins of future talent to get one win at the trade deadline.5In reality, St. Louis made a series of small moves, acquiring Brandon Moss, Steve Cishek and Jonathan Broxton.That the Cardinals (and the Los Angeles Dodgers and Washington Nationals) top the Doyle rankings runs a bit counter to the conventional wisdom, which says that less-talented teams have the most to gain from a big splash at the trade deadline. However, as long as a team’s Doyle Number is above 1, they’d be better off buying than selling. That’s why Doyle also would have recommended a classic buyer’s mentality for the Kansas City Royals, New York Yankees and Houston Astros — three teams that have found themselves in the midst of far better seasons than would be expected from their talent. This suggests the Royals were right to go for broke in the short term; for them, each marginal win of talent added in 2015 is worth forsaking about 1.5 wins of future talent.Of course, while we’ve focused exclusively on trade-deadline buyers thus far, other teams had to decide whether they’d be better off selling current assets for future wins. The Philadelphia Phillies, to take an extreme example, have literally no use for extra talent in 2015 because they’re all but eliminated from the playoffs. Therefore, their Doyle Number was 0.00.The Detroit Tigers had a Doyle Number of just 0.14, which would heavily recommend selling. In fact, the Tigers dealt stars David Price and Yoenis Cespedes at the deadline; it didn’t make manager Brad Ausmus happy, but Doyle was pleased.Indeed, selling is almost always right for teams on the outer fringes of playoff contention (before the deadline, the Tigers had only about a 7 percent chance of reaching the divisional playoffs). The average team begins the regular season with a 27 percent chance of making the divisional playoffs. If a team’s playoff odds are lower than that as of the trade deadline, it should usually sell.The in-between cases can be tricky, however. Despite having a talented roster, the Toronto Blue Jays entered the trade deadline with only about a 26 percent chance of making the playoffs. But they probably added the most talent at the deadline of any team in baseball in the form of Price and Troy Tulowitzki, sending numerous prospects packing.Their Doyle Number of 0.77 is slightly below 1, which might initially suggest that they made the wrong move. In fact, however — and we’ve avoided introducing this complication until now — a team’s Doyle Number varies based on how many wins of talent it might add or subtract. Teams like the Blue Jays actually enter the trade deadline with a ‘U’-shaped curve like the one you see below.We know this is getting abstract, but it has a really important baseball implication. It means that for a team like Toronto, the worst strategy is standing pat. In terms of maximizing its total number of World Series championships, it should either add talent at the deadline or punt on the season and play for future years. By Doyle’s logic, in fact, teams should be going “all-in,” moving as aggressively as possible in one or the other direction at the deadline. Adding two stars, like the Jays did with Tulo and Price, is better than one.6This is a consequence of the finding we described above: The marginal gain in World Series probability tends to increase, not diminish, with additional talent added. This also applies to the Mets, who, after getting cold feet on Carlos Gomez, eventually did deal for Cespedes. Doyle’s complaint might be that the Mets weren’t aggressive enough: They could have added a Cespedes for the rest of us and a star second baseman too!The Doyle system admittedly represents a vast simplification compared with all the considerations that could be included in such a model. Future iterations might take into account factors like a team’s financial situation and the quality of its minor-league system, among other things.7In addition, it can be hard in practice to add talent to an already stacked roster. But it at least offers a broad set of guidelines upon which to judge a front office’s decision-making process.While Doyle doesn’t vindicate every dubious decision — the Tigers had a 34 percent chance of making the playoffs on the date they traded for Alexander in 1987, which would have made for a close call — it suggests that teams should often be quite aggressive at the deadline. A team needs to be honest with itself about whether its World Series chances are legitimate, but if they are, it might never get a better chance at a championship. read more

Read More →

Ohio State baseball knocks down Youngstown State 30

The Ohio State baseball pitching staff, using five arms, combined for a two-hit shutout victory against Youngstown State Tuesday night, 3-0, at Bill Davis Stadium. The Buckeye hurlers combined for 10 strikeouts and did not walk a batter. The Penguins only looked more and more helpless at the plate as the game grew old – their final 13 hitters were retired in order. The lack of offense was welcomed by the sparse crowd of 495 on a night of low-40 degree temperatures, as the contest wrapped up in under two hours. The Buckeyes collected a hit and stolen base in each of the first two innings, but were unable to push any runs across the plate. Despite not allowing a hit, OSU senior starting pitcher Brett McKinney went just two frames before being pulled in favor of redshirt junior Tyler Giannonatti. After the Penguins followed suit, bringing freshman Lance Horner in to pitch the third, the first two Buckeyes reached base before the rally was brought to an abrupt end on an unassisted triple play by sophomore shortstop Phil Lipari. The unassisted triple play, with just 15 occurrences in MLB history according to MLB’s website, is more rare a feat than a perfect game. Youngstown State did not collect its first hit until the top of the fifth, when designated hitter David Saluga lined a single to right. Giannonatti would eventually pitch out of the jam, stranding a pair of base runners in his final inning of work. OSU freshman second baseman Troy Kuhn led off the sixth with a single, and was then put into scoring position on a sacrifice bunt by redshirt senior lead-off man Joe Ciamacco. The game found its first run one batter later on a base hit to center off of Horner by redshirt senior designated hitter Ryan Cypret. The rally came to an end three batters later, but not before the Buckeyes pushed an insurance run across to take a 2-0 lead. OSU would add another score the following inning on an RBI single by Kuhn, his third hit of the evening in as many at bats. OSU sophomore right-handed pitcher Trace Dempsey came in for the ninth and converted his team-leading eighth save. With three strikeouts in two innings of work, junior Greg Greve recorded the win, improving his record to 2-0. Horner took the loss in the first decision of his young career. OSU (17-8, 4-2 Big Ten) is scheduled to make a quick turnaround and welcome Miami (Ohio) to Bill Davis Stadium on Wednesday. First pitch is slated for 6:35 p.m. read more

Read More →

Football Ohio State defeats USC 247 to win the Cotton Bowl

Ohio State redshirt sophomore running back Mike Weber stiff-arms a defender during the first half of the Cotton Bowl against USC on Dec. 29. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorDALLAS — After the Cotton Bowl, Ohio State’s roster will experience much turnover. But during the final game of the season, it was turnovers that kept the Buckeyes in the game.Ohio State jumped out to a quick lead, scoring the first points less than three minutes into the game, and extended it to 24-0 with 5:27 remaining in the first half. It capitalized on two costly fumbles and an interception that senior safety Damon Webb returned for a touchdown.The Trojans bounced back, scoring a touchdown near the end of the first half, but did not score again, and the Buckeyes won 24-7 on Friday. Webb, one of 19 Ohio State seniors playing their final games, recovered wideout Deonta Burnett’s fumble that redshirt sophomore cornerback Kendall Sheffield forced. Then, he had a pick-six just 18 seconds into the second quarter on the first play of a USC drive.USC quarterback Sam Darnold, a potential top-five NFL draft pick, also fumbled when redshirt senior defensive end Tyquan Lewis stripped him and junior linebacker Jerome Baker recovered the loose ball. On the second play of Ohio State’s following drive, redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett raced for a 28-yard touchdown to give his team a 24-0 lead with 5:27 left in the second quarter. Barrett made more plays on the ground than in the air Friday. He rushed for a 1-yard touchdown, which set the program record for most touchdowns in a single season, for the first points of the game. Barrett ended the game, the final of his career, completing 11-of-17 passes for 114 yards. He led the team with 16 rushes for 66 yards. He did not have much support from his running backs, who struggled to find holes in the Trojans’ defense. Redshirt sophomore Mike Weber and freshman J.K. Dobbins combined for 18 carries for 57 yards. Despite the shaky performance on the ground, the Buckeyes ran the ball heavily. They had 37 rushes for 165 yards, compared to 11 pass attempts for 114 yards.The Trojans had even less success running the ball, combining for 36 carries for 57 yards. Running back Ronald Jones, who entered the game averaging 6.1 yards per carry, had 19 rushes for 64 yards, an average of 3.4 yards per carry. Darnold went 26-for-44 for 356 yards with one interception. He made eye-popping throws at times despite his receivers being draped by defenders, but also turned the ball over three times. The Buckeye defense constantly affected Darnold and pressured the quarterback. Ohio State had eight sacks and 14 tackles for loss. That pressure continued for the entire game. In the fourth quarter, senior defensive end Jalyn Holmes sacked Darnold, forcing a fumble, which redshirt sophomore defensive tackle Robert Landers recovered.Redshirt junior defensive end Sam Hubbard led the team with 2.5 sacks and 3.5 tackles for loss.The Buckeyes were missing junior cornerback Denzel Ward, who made a last-minute decision to skip the game in order to prepare for the NFL draft. read more

Read More →

PSV boss urges squad to not focus on swapping shirts with

first_imgPSV Eindhoven boss Mark van Bommel has urged the squad to focus on getting a positive result against Barcelona instead of worrying about swapping shirts with Lionel MessiThe Dutchman is preparing for his first European game at managerial level following his appointment as the new PSV coach earlier this summer.And things have got off to an impressive start for Van Bommel with PSV having comfortably won all five of their opening games of the 2018/19 Eredivisie campaign.But now the 41-year-old will face his first true test at managerial level in the form of his old team Barcelona and former teammate Lionel Messi.Many fancy the idea of getting a hold of their own original Messi shirt.But Van Bommel expects his players to remain professional as they begin their European campaign against the world’s best player.David Villa, SpainQuiz: How much do you know about David Villa? Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Time to test your knowledge about Spanish legendary forward David Villa.“If a player asks for Lionel Messi’s shirt, that is not strictly a matter for me,” Van Bommel told reporters on the club website.“If we can get a positive result from the match then everyone can fight for that shirt.“Part of being a professional is being extra focused and each time doing what is correct as a footballer.“I do not like when someone asks for the shirt during halftime, whether it’s for the best player in the world or not, I can understand the question, but not during halftime.“I only played with Leo when he made his Barca debut in 2005 but even by then, you could tell that he was destined for greatness.“For me, he is always the best in the world even when he does not win the Golden Ball.”last_img read more

Read More →

Sarris postmatch reaction inspired City win – Rudiger reveals

first_imgChelsea defender Antonio Rudiger has revealed that Maurizio Sarri’s terrifying post-match reaction after the loss to Wolves inspired the win over City.The Blues suffered a disappointing 2-1 defeat to Wolverhampton Wanderers last Wednesday despite taking the lead in the first half.The loss to Wolves handed Sarri only his second defeat as Chelsea boss but put a dent to their title aspirations.However, the Blues bounced back with an emphatic 2-0 win over champions Manchester City, ending Pep Guardiola’s side unbeaten run in the Premier League, thanks to goals from N’Golo Kante and David Luiz.Sacchi explains Sarri, Conte, and Ancelotti Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Arrigo Sacchi talked about how Sarri has a tougher time at Juventus than Conte at Inter; while Ancelotti’s “blood is boiling” at Napoli.Arrigo Sacchi…“After the Wolves game, he was terrifying,” Rudiger said, according to ESPN. “He was going crazy. But that was OK, because we shouldn’t have lost this match.”“The day after, he was very calm and clear-minded. He spoke with us and made it clear that we have to believe in ourselves. He wanted us to go into the City game looking for the win.”last_img read more

Read More →