VCNO Pays Visit to NS Guantanamo Bay

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today VCNO Pays Visit to NS Guantanamo Bay View post tag: NS Guantanamo Bay Authorities View post tag: americas Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO) Adm. Michelle Howard visited Naval Station (NS) Guantanamo Bay, Dec. 15-16.During the visit, Howard toured the Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay (JTF), enlisted barracks, pier facilities, and the desalination and power plant.She also conducted an all-hands call for more than 500 Sailors, Coast Guardsman and Marines stationed at NS Guantanamo Bay.During her speech she touched on the importance of increasing the percentage of females in the military from the current percentage of 17 to 25 percent in order to normalize relationships within the Navy and create better command climates.Along with the gender integration I want to touch on environment and relationships. We need to create climates where folks are used to dealing with and understanding each other’s cultures and differences.She also shared with the audience the results from the most recent sexual assault survey.We learned that we have had less sexual assault in the last year than we have had in the previous two years, however we still had 5 percent of women and 2 percent of men report some type of sexual assault over the last year.After discussing gender integration, environment and relationships she touched on cyber culture.She noted the importance of better educating the Navy team about the operational impact of cyber in order to transform the culture.Following her remarks, Howard took questions from the audience, which ranged from big Navy issues to NS Guantanamo Bay specific issues.[mappress mapid=”14771″]Press release, Image: US Navy View post tag: Navy View post tag: Pays View post tag: News by topiccenter_img View post tag: Naval VCNO Pays Visit to NS Guantanamo Bay View post tag: VCNO December 19, 2014 View post tag: Visit Share this articlelast_img read more

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US Navy awards Harris $27M for electronic warfare payloads

first_img June 30, 2016 View post tag: US Navy View post tag: Harris Corporation Authorities View post tag: Decoy The U.S. Navy has American defense contractor Harris Corporation a $27 million order to deliver maritime electronic warfare (EW) payloads for the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory’s Advanced Decoy Architecture Project (ADAP) program.The order, issued under a three-year, $54 million ceiling IDIQ contract received in September 2015, also includes testing and engineering services to help meet current and future EW mission requirements, the company said.The Harris-developed ADAP EW payloads represent an upgrade to the existing BAE Systems-built Nulka decoy, currently in service with the U.S. Navy, Coast Guard, Royal Australian Navy and Royal Canadian Navy.“Decoys are an essential layer of shipboard protection, often serving as the last line of electronic defense,” said Ed Zoiss, president, Harris Electronic Systems.“Harris ADAP payloads defeat the most sophisticated RF-guided anti-ship weapons with electronic techniques built upon decades of electronic warfare and countermeasure design experience.” Back to overview,Home naval-today US Navy awards Harris $27M contract for electronic warfare payloads US Navy awards Harris $27M contract for electronic warfare payloads Share this articlelast_img read more

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Speech Language Pathology Assistant (SLPA) Adjunct Assistant Professor

first_imgTotal Hrs per Week/Day SalaryPlease see LRCCD Salary Schedules Work Schedule Part-time, Assistant Professor Position. Adjunct pools are opencontinuously and applicants are contacted/hired year round forassignments based on college needs. Beginning and/or Ending Dates Application Instructions How and where to apply 1. Have a master’s degree from an accredited institution in speechpathology, speech language pathology, speech language and hearingsciences, communicative disorders, communicative disorder andsciences, communication sciences and disorders, or education with aconcentration in speech pathology; OR, hold a California CommunityCollege Instructor’s Credential in the discipline area; OR, theequivalent.*2. Have an equity-minded focus, responsiveness, and sensitivity toand understanding of the diverse academic, socioeconomic, cultural,disability, gender identity, sexual orientation, and ethnicbackgrounds of community college students, including those withphysical or learning disabilities as it relates to differences inlearning styles; and successfully foster and support an inclusiveeducational and employment environment.*Note: Applicants applying under the “equivalent” provision mustattach details and explain how their academic preparation is theequivalent of the degrees listed above. Applicant DocumentsRequired DocumentsUnofficial Transcript 1Optional DocumentsUnofficial Transcript 2Unofficial Transcript 3Resume/Curriculum VitaeLetter of InterestLetter of Recommendation 1Letter of Recommendation 2Equivalency Determination Letter (P-38 or Equivalency RequestStatement)P-881 Report of Arrests Which Led To Convictions For CrimeDocument Assignment Responsibilities Posting Details Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*). Special Requirements Work YearN/A Job Posting TitleSpeech Language Pathology Assistant (SLPA) Adjunct AssistantProfessor Considering this specific position that you are applying to –where/how did you learn about this position?College DepartmentCareerBuilderChronicle of Higher Ed (Vitea.com)Community College Registry Job Fair: OaklandCommunity College Registry Job Fair: Los AngelesCommunity College Registry Online Job BoardCommunity Outreach (ex. Festivals, etc.)CommunityCollegeJobsComunidadCraigslistDiverse: Issues in Higher EducationD’Primeramano MagazineEdJoinFacebook (Campaign)Facebook (Los Rios Page)GlassdoorGreater Sacramento Urban LeagueHandshake (CSU, UC Job Boards)HigheredJobsIndeedInstagramJob SitesJob JournalLatina Leadership Network of the California CommunityCollegesLinkedInLos Rios Community College District EmployeeLos Rios Community College District Human Resources EmailLos Rios Community College District WebsiteLRCCD Resource Group – API (Asian Pacific Islander Legacy)LRCCD Resource Group – Black Faculty & Staff Association(BFSA)LRCCD Resource Group Native American Collaborative (NAC)LRCCD Resource Group – Spectrum (LGBTQIA+)Professional NetworksSacramento Black Chamber of CommerceSacramento Asian Chamber of CommerceSacramento Builders ExchangeSacramento Hispanic Chamber of CommerceSacramento Rainbow Chamber of CommerceSacramentoWorksThe HUBTwitterYouTubeZipRecruiter Position Summary All Positions: Offers of employment are contingent upon thesuccessful clearance from a criminal background check, freedom fromtuberculosis, and proof of identity and eligibility to work in theUnited States prior to the first day of work. The District mayselect additional qualified candidates should unexpected vacanciesor needs occur during this recruitment/selection process. Wheneducation is a requirement for the position, official academictranscripts from the accredited college/university must besubmitted within 60 days of hire. Quicklinkhttps://jobs.losrios.edu/postings/2946 Posting NumberF00167Pcenter_img LocationLos Rios Community College District (District Office) Conditions Physical Demands Posting Date Minimum Qualifications The Los Rios Community College District is seeking a pool ofqualified applicants for possible temporary part-time facultyteaching assignments. These positions are filled on an as neededbasis and are on-going recruitment efforts.Adjunct pools are open continuously and applicants arecontacted/hired year round for assignments based on collegeneeds.Teaching assignments may include day, evening, on-line, hybrid,weekend, and/or off campus classes. Department Location General Responsibilities:The adjunct faculty member shall be responsible for the following:teaching assigned classes under the supervision of the area dean;helping students fulfill their maximum potential in masteringcourse content; assessing student learning outcomes; maintaining athorough and up-to-date knowledge in his/her regular teachingfield; continuing professional development; utilizing currenttechnology in the performance of job duties; maintaining standardsof professional conduct and ethics appropriate to the professionalposition; assisting with articulation and curriculum developmentand review; serving on college committees and participating infaculty governance including accreditation and studentco-curricular activities; assuming other responsibilities asassigned by the area dean; fulfilling other duties andresponsibilities of an adjunct faculty member as outlined in thecollege faculty handbook. Please visit our Frequently Asked Questions for completeinformation on how to apply online with our District. Applicationservices are available between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Mondaythrough Friday, at the Los Rios Community College District HumanResources Office located at 1919 Spanos Court, Sacramento, CA95825-3981. If you need assistance with any phase of theapplication process, please call (916) 568-3112 or come in duringour business hours. After hours inquiries to be emailed [email protected] Open ContinuouslyYes Closing Date Applicants applying to this Los Rios Community College Districtadjunct faculty posting are required to complete fully andsubmit:1. Los Rios Community College District Faculty Application2. Unofficial transcripts of college/university work ** (graduateadvising documents and grade reports will not be accepted asunofficial transcripts). NOTE : Los Rios employees are alsorequired to submit unofficial copies of transcripts.3. Resume or Curriculum Vitae (recommended).4. Two letters of recommendation (recommended).5. Letter of Interest (recommended).**Note: Applications submitted without transcripts will bedisqualified. Also individuals who have completed college oruniversity course work at an institution in a country other thanthe United States must obtain a complete evaluation of foreigntranscripts, degrees and other relevant documents. A foreigntranscript evaluation is required any time foreign course work isused to meet minimum qualifications and/or salary placement even ifthe foreign transcript has been accepted by a college or universityin the United States.Foreign transcript evaluations ONLY accepted from AICE (Associationof International Credential Evaluations, Inc.) or NACES (TheNational Association of Credential Evaluation Services) agencies orevaluators. Foreign Degree Transcript Evaluations click hereDo not submit additional materials that are not requested. AboutThe Los Rios Community College District ( LRCCD ) is the secondlargest, two-year public college district in California, servingapproximately 75,000 students in the greater Sacramento region. Thedistrict’s 2,400 square mile service area includes Sacramento andEl Dorado counties and parts of Yolo, Placer, and Solano countiesand is comprised of four uniquely diverse colleges – AmericanRiver, Cosumnes River, Folsom Lake and Sacramento City colleges. Inaddition to each college’s main campus, the district offerseducational centers in Placerville, Davis, West Sacramento, ElkGrove, Natomas and Rancho Cordova.The Los Rios district office is centrally located in the heart ofthe Sacramento valley. The growing Capital Region has strongcommunities and emergent arts and dining scenes, and is nearby someof the most celebrated tourist destinations in the country – LakeTahoe, Napa Valley, and San Francisco. The Sacramento area is agreat place to live and work!StrengthsThe district has approximately 4,000 employees throughout our fourcolleges and district office in dozens of different departmentsthat provide welcoming, inclusive, and equitable environments forLos Rios students, employees and community partners. Each and everydistrict and college department strives for the highest quality inall programs, services, and activities, and is focused on improvingeducational outcomes for the students we serve.Our VisionOur colleges offer equity-minded, academically rigorous, studentsuccess centered education. Our objective is to help our studentssuccessfully achieve their academic goals, whether they want totransfer to a four-year college or university, earn an associatedegree, or obtain one of more than 100 certificates in high demandcareer fields.The Los Rios Community College District’s Human ResourcesDepartment is committed to diversity, equity, and to ensuring aninclusive, thriving environment for all of its employees, students,and surrounding communities. To that end, the Human ResourcesDepartment is intentional in recruiting, hiring, and retainingdiverse employees, to reflect the diversity of our colleges’student populations. Criminal History Verification and Release: I acknowledge andagree that I understand that by answering the question below, Icertify that the information provided by me is true, correct andcomplete to the best of my knowledge and belief. I authorizeinvestigation of all statements contained herein, and on the P-881(if applicable and submitted), and I release from liability allpersons and organizations furnishing such information. I understandthat any misstatements, omissions or misrepresentation of facts onthis form, my application, and, if applicable, the P-881 orattachment(s) may be cause for disqualification or dismissal. Ifyou have ever been convicted of an offense other than a minortraffic violation you are required to complete the form ‘ArrestsWhich Led to Convictions for Crime’, P-881 (you must discloseconvictions that have been dismissed pursuant to Penal Code Section1203.4; Ed. Code 87008). Please copy and paste the provided URL forthe form -https://losrios.edu/docs/lrccd/employees/hr/forms/p-881.pdf – andattach the completed form to your application.Yes, I acknowledge and agreeNo, I do not acknowledge or agree Can you perform the essential functions of this position?YesNo Please indicate how you meet the minimum qualifications forthis position. Select the appropriate answer.I possess the minimum qualifications for this discipline aslisted on the job announcement. (Attach unofficial transcripts froman accredited college/university and/or evidence of jobexperience.)I possess a valid California Community College Credential forthis discipline. (Attach a copy of appropriate credential withapplication.)I possess qualifications equivalent to those listed and haveattached evidence. (To review Equivalency Process.)I have previously been granted equivalency to teach thisdiscipline by the Los Rios Community College District. (Attach theEquivalency Determination Form P-38 and transcripts.) The Institution Additional Salary InformationNo additional salary information to notelast_img read more

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Postdoctoral position in Physics and Astronomy

first_imgAn outstanding postdoctoral fellow is sought to develop prudentacquisition plans for the WFIRST investigation of type Iasupernovae. The successful candidate will develop strategies tomaximizing the supernova yields at specific redshifts, to obtainoptimal spectroscopic identifications and redshifts for asufficient fraction of candidate supernovae, to provide sufficientsampling for optical photometric identification of the remainingsample, and to efficiently sample light curves (with considerationfor coordinated observtions) to enable distance measurements. Thiswork will also examine the use of host environment characteristicsas priors to aid in candidate selections, and examine trades infilter and spectral element selection to best optimize thesurvey.A Ph. D. in astronomy, astrophysics, or physics is required. Weseek candidates with strong interpersonal and communication skills.The Johns Hopkins University is an Affirmative Action/EqualOpportunity Employer of women, minorities, veterans, andindividuals with disabilities and encourages applications fromindividuals within these and other protected groups. Considerationof applications will start immediately and will continue until theposition is filled. Interested candidates should submit a CV, alist of publication, and a research statement, and arrange for twoletters of recommendation to be sent via Interfolio to https://apply.interfolio.com/73607 Applications received by February 21 will receive fullconsiderationThe Johns Hopkins University is committed to equal opportunity forits faculty, staff, and students. To that end, the university doesnot discriminate on the basis of sex, gender, marital status,pregnancy, race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age,disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity orexpression, veteran status or other legally protectedcharacteristic. The university is committed to providing qualifiedindividuals access to all academic and employment programs,benefits and activities on the basis of demonstrated ability,performance and merit without regard to personal factors that areirrelevant to the program involved.The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfmlast_img read more

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Corpus Christi Pimms Meeting

first_imgCorpus Christi’s JCR meeting proved more pleasurable than most at the weekend after being exchanged for Pimms and strawberries in the garden. With only one financial motion, it was decided to put JCR money to good use, buy some alcohol and move proceedings outside. Some members, though, condemned the action as ‘unconstitutional’, evidently preferring to stifle in the grips of debate than enjoy the delights of summer.ARCHIVE: 2nd Week TT 2003last_img

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Interviews are for toffs

first_imgNew research has suggested that Oxford’s admissions policies is biased towards public school pupils. The findings of a report from the Higher Education Funding Council for England showed that of students applying to the country’s top thirteen universities with 28 A level points (corresponding to two A grades and a B), 60% of pupils from fee-paying schools were accepted by top universities in the country compared with just 40% of state school pupils with the same grades. Critics of the current admissions process assert that this reflects the fact that state school pupils are discouraged from applying, or are underestimated by teachers when awarded predicted grades (the current basis for awarding university offers). They also argue that the existing emphasis on interviews favours pupils from fee-paying schools, who are well practised and articulate. A spokeswoman for the University disputed thse claims. She said, “We have a very active programme to widen access which is backed up by a rigorous admissions procedure which ensures that students are admitted solely on the basis of academic ability and potential, irrespective of their social or educational background.”ARCHIVE: 3rd week TT 2004last_img read more

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Feature: Sport In Art

first_imgIt’s very easy to think of sport and art as two very different, and even opposed, parts of life. There are a good number of ‘artsy’ types who pride themselves on their incompetence and indifference towards sport, and who would rather hear their mother’s chastity raucously questioned than be accused of knowing just how well Arsenal have started this season. And there are all those sports fans (though perhaps fewer in Oxford than I remember from that distant outside world) who seem to think that their hard-won physique will instantly melt away if they even think about doing something as ridiculous as stepping into a theatre or reading some poetry. Personally, I can’t claim to be a great sportsman. And my artistic achievements are never going to amount to anything spectacular. I am, though, a fan of both the arts and the sports. There is no need to chose between them. Sport and art have a long and happy history together, and, (like any good marriage or tutorial pairing) that’s a lot to do with the fact that deep down they’re not so different from each other.The Greeks were the great sportsmen and women of the ancient world. They also gave us the first great examples of sport in art. Our modern Olympic games are named after those held in Greece for over a thousand years, but that was just one of several international sporting festivals that were held alongside numerous local events. And the Greeks loved depicting these sports in various works of art almost as much as they loved watching and taking part in them. Winners would commission paintings, (now lost to us), and statues to record their achievements, and sporting scenes were popular as designs for ceramic pots – especially vessels for drinking wine. The Ashmolean has a fantastic collection where, more than two thousand years later, we can still watch, in all their naked and rampant glory, ancient athletes competing in the middle of other triumphs than ours. Other popular designs included scenes of religious life, and it seems right that sport, religion, art and wine should all be mixed up like that. Athletes would ask the gods to favour them, and then celebrate at a party afterwards where short poems written to mark their victory would be recited. It was all part of a celebration of the exceptional in life, and what was special included both sporting and artistic achievement. Music was a very important part of several festivals, and the awarding of prizes for artistic merit, such as those awarded to playwrights in Athens, was done in the same way as the awarding of prizes to athletes. Sporting victory also had social implications, pointing out that you had the leisure and wealth to dedicate yourself to sport. Making this clear without arousing too much jealousy may have been one of the functions of the poems athletes paid to have written about their victories. Short versions would be recited soon after the contest, whilst more elaborate poems were worked up ready for the athlete’s arrival home when they would probably be performed in public. They often make a big deal of dedicating much of the glory of the victory to the community in general, presumably to encourage them to listen to more of their champion’s self-congratulation without getting too envious. Drunken rugby teams take note.These poems were only really popular for a short period about five hundred years before the birth of Christ, but many of them have long been regarded as amongst the finest literary productions of the ancient world. The odes of Pindar are particularly admired. These were all written to record sporting victories and are largely responsible for the use of the ode as a form by English poets of the last few hundred years. Without the athletes, who were Pindar’s customers, Wordsworth would not have written his Ode on Intimations and we would never have had the odes of Shelley or Keats. Theses poets weren’t writing about sport, but the art form they were using only exists because of athletic competitions. The great writers of the classical world were often inspired more directly by sport. Homer has a long passage on ceremonial funeral games which led Virgil to include a similar section on sports in the Aeneid. Maybe it’s for the same reason that there’s a short discussion of Gaelic sports in Ulysses. Sport has often found a place in the art of the modern world as well. One of my favourite books is The Compleat Angler by Izaak Walton. First published in 1653, it’s a practical guide to fishing that also manages to touch on just about everything else important in life. It’s a meditation on a much loved sport and all the problems of living a good and happy life that’s gone through more editions than any book other than the Bible. And it has pictures.More recent works of literature about sport include The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner. It’s a short story by Alan Silletoe, later made into a film, about a teenage boy in a borstal in the 1950s who finds a measure of escape from his rather grim life by dedicating himself to the sport of, surprisingly, long distance running. Just like a Greek athlete, he uses sport to transcend himself. More importantly, he’s eventually able to use his achievements to spread a little bit of subversion and strike a small blow at a society that’s always been trying to put him down. Just like Pindar knew, sport can be dangerous when you’re not careful. The sport best represented in British art is probably cricket. There are pictures of games that look something like cricket in fourteenth century manuscripts in the Bodleian, and depictions in the painted windows of the same age in the cathedrals of Gloucester and Canterbury. Cricket as we know it today emerged during the Eighteenth Century, and the first paintings were made around the 1740s. These paintings and engravings are invaluable to historians who can use them when trying to reconstruct early forms of the game. Many, for example, show just how far apart the two stumps used at the time were placed. More than big enough to allow the ball to pass between them without dislodging the bales by even a hair’s breadth! Cricket was universally acknowledged to be a fine ‘manly’ game, and it very soon became the done thing for a boy or young man to be painted holding a cricket bat, legs casually crossed. Just as the odes of the ancient Greeks could play an important social purpose, artists were soon able to use cricket to make a point. An engraving of 1778 shows ‘Miss Wicket’ adopting the clichéd but very unladylike pose of the bat-wielding, cricket-playing young gentleman. If that wasn’t warning enough to the men-folk of the world, her friend ‘Miss Trigger’ carries a rifle and a brace of pheasants. The art of cricket was being parodied for a very socially engaged purpose.Cricket remains a popular subject for artists today, but it’s certainly not the only sport to do so. Even ignoring the kitsch on sale in any sport team’s magastore, (as the are invariably dubbed), sport continues to enjoy a healthy and evolving relationship with art. This time next year, the V&A will be hosting an exhibition on ‘Fashion and Sport’ exploring the relationship between the two. Sporting memorabilia continues to blur the line between sport and art. Think, for example, of all those football shirts framed just like paintings and hung on the walls of pubs. I’m sure the Greeks, with their illustrated amphorae, would salute such a familiar confluence of art, alcohol and athleticism. Even the last century’s most celebrated artist had a fascination with sport. Pablo Picasso might not have been much of a cricketer – few Spaniards are – but he maintained a life-long interest in bull-fighting. Not only were fights staged in his honour, but he also produced posters for local events. A bull appears in his famous painting Guernica, and bull-fighting featured as a theme in his work throughout his career, just as it did in Goya’s a hundred and fifty years before. Like many other artists of the Twentieth Century, he was attracted by the mythic connotations of bull-fighting and never shied away from its violent nature. In fact, that violence was an integral part of what made the sport such a compelling subject to Picasso and other artists.Cinema too has had a long love affair with sport. Some of the oldest films from the turn of the last century are records of football matches. Because early cameras could only hold a few minutes of film, there was no way to film a whole match. As a result, there’s not much footage of actual play. It’s hard to predict before a match when exactly the most exciting twenty seconds are going to be. Instead, the cameras would capture the shots of the crowd and the teams emerging from the tunnel onto the pitch. Not quite Match of the Day, but it was a start.Today, some of the most popular films in history are about sport. Boxing films have a particularly rich tradition producing such classics as Rocky, (winner of the Oscar for Best Picture) and Raging Bull, for which Robert De Niro won the Best Actor award. Whilst Rocky gives us a rather schmaltzy underdog story, Raging Bull doesn’t flinch from the raw savagery of boxing. Like many great sports films, Raging Bull uses sport partly to explore the psychology of its protagonist. De Niro plays Jake LaMotta, a talented boxer from the Bronx who climbs towards the top of his sport before losing it all. He ends up destroying himself with jealousy over his second wife, Vicki. LaMotta’s destructive passions are reflected in the film’s uncompromisingly violent boxing scenes, and the similarity of the story to Othello has often been remarked upon by critics. I’m pretty sure the Greeks would have recognised this type of art, a complicated exploration of combat and contest. Somewhat ironically, I think they’d have preferred it to the 1981 film Chariots of Fire, which is about the 1924 Olympics. Like Rocky, it won the Oscar for Best Picture, and like Raging Bull it uses sport to explore the psychologies and relationships of its characters. No Greek, though, would share the Scottish runner Liddell’s worries that his religion and his sporting commitments were in conflict.Fever Pitch by Nick Hornby became another popular sporting film in 1997. Fever Pitch is different to other sports films though. It’s not told from the perspective of a sportsman, but that of a fan following Arsenal in their 1988-9 season. It’s also a romantic comedy as well as a sports film. It’s not so much a film about excelling or beating the odds, but about sport as a part of someone’s life alongside things like love which is, in its own little way, almost as important. The structure of the football season, familiar to any fan, shapes the film and jollies it along; hope and rebirth in late August, confusion and uncertainty through the winter, climaxes of triumph and despair in May. Cricket in the summer if they’re broad-minded. It’s the modern man’s equivalent of the agricultural cycle. One of the reasons that sport and art go together so well is that they’re so very similar. The experience of going to a sporting event like a big football match isn’t so different to, say, going to the opera. Bear with me on this one. You make a special journey to a venue which is specially put aside from day to day life for one particular activity to see the best people in the world doing something which, a lot of the time, is being done completely for its own sake. We even dress up in a special way for both. Alright, footballers play football because they earn a lot of money, but they’re only paid that much because millions of people care a lot about, and will spend a lot of money on, an activity that has no direct effect on the outside world. Which is where sport differs from religion, which claims to affect the whole world and more. Sport’s a bit closer to how we think about art sometimes, as something that’s worth doing for its own sake. After all, we could keep fit by simply running on a tread mill all on our own, and we’re all a bit suspicious of ideas that sport ‘builds character’ or teaches ‘leadership’, but we still carry on playing sport despite the apparent lack of purpose. In the same way, we can still care a lot about literature and music even if we’re not sure they can do anything to transform our lives or society. We like art just because we like it. It makes us happy.It’s no coincidence that football is called ‘the beautiful game’. A game of football can be very pretty to watch. Most fans have a few favourites. The Brazil team of 1982, Arsenal 2002-3, Leicester City 1996-7. Maybe that last one’s just me. Its beauty is one of the reasons football’s so popular. When it’s played well, it’s a free flowing game with plenty of opportunity for invention and displays of individual virtuosity. It’s almost unique amongst sports for the degree to which it rewards improvisation, and the best teams always surprise you with the way they can rethink traditional forms of play and movement and do something unexpected with the familiar. Doesn’t that sound like some types of art? Isn’t it a bit like an elaborate, improvised dance form? Some narrow minded people might say that’s going a bit far but as the recent goings on at Chelsea show, (Mourinho was sacked partly, the rumour goes, for not getting his team to play attractive enough football), football fans do care about aesthetics. A team’s never considered truly great until it’s won consistently by playing football that’s beautiful to watch. People often talk about the aesthetic aspect of cricket. A well timed shot can be graceful, but it’s the ebb and flow of a cricket match that’s really satisfying. Like one of those big Romantic symphonies, a long sonnet cycle or a TV series, a five day test match grows organically with almost infinitely complex shapes and rhythms. If you listen to Test Match Special on the radio, you’ll know how obsessed cricket fans can be by statistics. They’ll count anything, and tell you everything down to when the last time was that three no-balls were bowled in an over from the Nursery End during the second innings of a match where less than three hundred runs were being chased and the umpire had egg sandwiches for tea. This obsession with statistics is one way of making sense of such a fantastically complexly structured phenomenon. It helps pick out all the different shapes and stories which overlap each other in any one match. It’s just like trying to remember all the schemes and patterns and stories going on at once in Paradise Lost or Ulysses. Every single ball is a contest between bowler and batsman that can only be understood as part of that over which you need to think of as part of the way that session’s gone which is just one part of a match which fits into that particular test series which is part of a history of matches going back one hundred years. And then there’s the story of how that batsman’s been playing that summer, (perhaps he’s nervous having done really badly the week before), and maybe there’s a big rivalry between him and the bowler, and then you need to think of the way this particular pitch behaved in similar conditions three years ago… It’s just the same way a work of literature like The Faerie Queene works, piling story on top of story to create an intensely meaningful whole. Which is why people care. We’re always hearing snotty remarks about how silly it is to be so worked up about whether an artificial bladder crosses a line or not, but quit honestly that’s very short-sighted. As I see it, it’s a great miracle that people can find meaning in such a silly activity. It’s fantastic that they care. People sometimes talk about fans as if they suffer from some pitiful mental disability, some infantile delusion. But really, it takes anything but stupidity to concentrate intensely on something for ninety minutes. We all know that from lectures. And why should it be pitiable to care about what happens on a sports field? Is it really any different to going to a theatre and being moved by what you rationally know are just people pretending to do things they’re not? When you take the time to learn some of the intricate details of any sport, it almost always proves to be just as rewarding in its own way as any art form. Sports fans recognise this. Manchester United brand their stadium at Old Trafford as ‘The Theatre of Dreams’. They know that what they’re offering to people has a lot of the same qualities as what’s offered up at Covent Garden. What I like about art is that it offers the spectacle of form and narrative and beauty, all combined in the same action. Well, sport’s exactly the same. A game of tennis, as Robert Frost recognised when he famously said he’d rather play tennis with the net down than write free verse, has form in the same way a sonnet does. And when a master of the sport like Roger Federer plays, he uses that form to do things that are really beautiful and add to what’s known as ‘Tennis History’, which is really just another story. Like King Lear is just another story. The Greeks loved stories, and they loved sport too. I’m sure they’d have loved modern Britain where, today, we’re lucky enough to have some of the best sport and some of the best art in the world right on our doorsteps. So go and join the college hockey team and then write a poem about it.last_img read more

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Album: The Ironweed Project, Dustbowl

first_imgby Paul BlakeHow to describe The Ironweed Project? Probably safest to call it electronica, but with a big dollup of the blues mixed in. Aniff Akinola (aka Ironweed) has set out to mix the Mississippi Delta with the UK dance music scene, and he’s done a pretty good job of it. Having said that, Ironweed isn’t that revolutionary; there isn’t much in here you couldn’t find in parts of Moby, Groove Armada or Massive Attack. The blues influence is normally limited to a repeated blues-guitar riff, a deep-south feel in the lyrics and the occasional bit of organ or harmonica.The album starts strong with a jaunty country guitar riff over a background crackle and a monologue describing 1940s Mississippi in Aniff’s wonderfully deep and scratchy voice. Good so far, but it’s the appearance of the electronic drumbeats that let you know you’re in for something more special. The next track, ‘She Wore Hi Heels’, although very good, doesn’t have the same degree of blues influence that sets apart the first track, and rest of the album doesn’t really live up to that initial excitement. Having said that, it’s still very good, albeit in a more conventional hip-hop or electronica fashion. Ironweed shows he can master tunes suitable for clubbing, like ‘Brown Sugar’, or thoughtful techno like ‘All By Myself’. Even the tracks I found most annoying on the album – ‘Boom Boom Clap’ and ‘Lets Swim Like Wales’ – are irksome most of all for the catchiness of their repetitious tunes.Listening to this album, what I wanted to hear more of was the blues influence that Ironweed is trumpeting as his selling point and that makes him stand out. It isn’t that the blues guitar and monologues about life in Southern prisons make the music better – they just make it more exciting. Lots of people will probably find this music a bit too odd for their tastes, which is a shame. But if you have an open-minded interest in music, a love of the blues or electronica, (or even better all three!) I would definitely recommend giving this a listen.last_img read more

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The Review: The Nosebag

first_img6-8 St. Michael’s Street4/5 Two words which sum up the Nosebag: ‘elderflower wine’. Could you get any more wholesome without using ‘organic’ as a prefix? And wholesome is exactly what you will find if you venture up the creaky wooden staircase of the Nosebag’s 15th Century listed building and enter a world of terracotta walls, chunky check blinds, hanging pot plants and kitsch table flowers. The set up is simple; bench seating and counter service – cold food dished up and handed over on the spot, hot meals brought to your table. The ever-changing menu is as rustic as the décor might suggest, with simple dishes done to a consistently high standard. At lunchtime take advantage of the gargantuan portions of salad (£4.15 for three different kinds); choose between wheatberry and peanut, white cabbage and apple, or pesto pasta, for a start. Also available are quiches, jacket potatoes, soups and a handful of hot dishes such as lasagne. For dinner all the lunchtime options are still on offer, and a few extra ‘proper’ meals (£7 – £9) added. We ordered our mains first, then decided to get a chicken liver pâté to start (£4.50 with a hunk of bread and salad). The waitress behind the counter raised her eyebrows as if we had asked for our chicken to be cooked rare. ‘Are you sure?’ This was a novelty; an employee advising against a purchase, though luckily my companion views eating as a competitive sport. She did, however, have a point; the servings are very large, so make sure you work up an appetite before you visit. The pâté was delicious, though like novices we misjudged the bread to spread ratio, and ended up having to slather it onto slices of tomato when the roll disappeared. The mains were hearty and filling, the best being the beef and Guinness stew with herb and horseradish cobblers, vegetables or salad (£8.75). The cobblers (a cross between a scone and a dumpling, but far superior to both) were delicious, buttery and light, with a genius ability to soak up the stew without going soggy. Our other main, a pumpkin and red pepper tagine with couscous and salad (£8.25) was tasty but lacked the comfort-food element of the stew. The Nosebag is an excellent place for vegetarian fodder which makes up around half of their overall output; it is, however, priced very similarly to the meaty options, which may make them seem expensive to some. I suppose you pay a premium for freshness here, but it’s a worthwhile premium to pay. If you still have room, the homemade desserts and cakes should not be overlooked, and thus I am forced to make a very controversial statement: the brownies here (£1.70) are the best in Oxford. They are so good that I had to cut them up into little squares pre-consumption in order to savour every squidgy, fudgey mouthful. The Nosebag is ideal for an informal, impromptu bite to eat, a cosy haven of homely calm amidst the chaos of Oxford life. Take your mum, she’ll love it. by Kate Hayterlast_img read more

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